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World Input-Output Network.

Cerina F, Zhu Z, Chessa A, Riccaboni M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions.Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages.We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Linkalab, Complex Systems Computational Laboratory, Cagliari, Italy; Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Foreign Share of the Intermediate Transactions.We calculate the foreign share of the transactions matrix Z over time. We calculate the percentage of inputs from foreign origins (or equivalently, the percentage of outputs to foreign destinations) of the transactions matrix Z of the 40 WIOD economies. The same hump-shaped behavior over time is observed here as in assortativity and clustering coefficient.
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pone.0134025.g004: Foreign Share of the Intermediate Transactions.We calculate the foreign share of the transactions matrix Z over time. We calculate the percentage of inputs from foreign origins (or equivalently, the percentage of outputs to foreign destinations) of the transactions matrix Z of the 40 WIOD economies. The same hump-shaped behavior over time is observed here as in assortativity and clustering coefficient.

Mentions: The global network properties we quantify for the WION include assortativity, clustering coefficient, and degree and strength distributions. Because the WION is directed, we can calculate the assortativity coefficient in three ways, namely, in-degree assortativity, out-degree assortativity, and total-degree assortativity. As shown in Panel (A) of Fig 3, they all behave similarly over time. First, they have all been negative throughout the whole period. Since assortativity measures the tendencies of nodes to connect with other nodes that have similar (or dissimilar) degrees as themselves, a negative coefficient means that dissimilar nodes are more likely to be connected. In the case of the WION, all the coefficients are of very small magnitude less than 0.06, but with statistical significance as shown in Panel (B) of Fig 3. Notice that when calculating the assortativity for in-degree, out-degree, and total-degree, respectively, we consider the nodes as the neighbors of a given node if they are connected with the given node by only incoming edges, by only outgoing edges, and by either incoming or outgoing edges, respectively. In contrast, Carvalho [14] defines the neighborhood solely on the basis of the incoming edges and finds a positive assortative relationship. One possible explanation of the negativity is that high-degree industries such as construction often take inputs (or supply outputs) from (or to) low-degree industries such as transport services. Moreover, the spatial constraints (each node has only few neighboring nodes in the same country) introduce degree-degree anticorrelations (disassortativity) since high degree sectors are in different countries and the probability to connect decays with distance [34]. Second, all the coefficients show an increasing trend before 2007 and a significant decline after 2007. The behavior of the assortativity measures seems to be correlated with the trend of the foreign share in the inter-industrial transactions over time (Fig 4). That is, we can calculate the foreign share of the intermediate transactions as the percentage of inputs from foreign origins (or equivalently, the percentage of outputs to foreign destinations) of the transactions matrix Z of the 40 WIOD economies. Same as observed in assortativity, the foreign share of Z has a steady growth (from 9.9% in 1995 to 12.8% in 2007) before 2007 and a sharp decrease after 2007 (While the most severely depressed domestic edges during 2008–2009 in terms of the magnitude of the reduced flows are mostly within USA, the top 3 most impacted foreign edges are all from the mining industry to the coke and fuel industry and are from Canada to USA, from Netherlands to Belgium, and from Mexico to USA, respectively.). The increase in the foreign share implies more interactions across economies and hence tends to make the WION less dissortative. The opposite happens when the foreign share goes down as a result of the global financial crisis. Third, we notice that the in-degree assortativity tends to be lower than the out-degree assortativity, but there is a tendency to close the gap between the two measures. We interpret this evidence as a clear signal of the integration of production chains, that is to say, both global buying and selling hubs have now a higher chance to be connected across borders.


World Input-Output Network.

Cerina F, Zhu Z, Chessa A, Riccaboni M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Foreign Share of the Intermediate Transactions.We calculate the foreign share of the transactions matrix Z over time. We calculate the percentage of inputs from foreign origins (or equivalently, the percentage of outputs to foreign destinations) of the transactions matrix Z of the 40 WIOD economies. The same hump-shaped behavior over time is observed here as in assortativity and clustering coefficient.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519177&req=5

pone.0134025.g004: Foreign Share of the Intermediate Transactions.We calculate the foreign share of the transactions matrix Z over time. We calculate the percentage of inputs from foreign origins (or equivalently, the percentage of outputs to foreign destinations) of the transactions matrix Z of the 40 WIOD economies. The same hump-shaped behavior over time is observed here as in assortativity and clustering coefficient.
Mentions: The global network properties we quantify for the WION include assortativity, clustering coefficient, and degree and strength distributions. Because the WION is directed, we can calculate the assortativity coefficient in three ways, namely, in-degree assortativity, out-degree assortativity, and total-degree assortativity. As shown in Panel (A) of Fig 3, they all behave similarly over time. First, they have all been negative throughout the whole period. Since assortativity measures the tendencies of nodes to connect with other nodes that have similar (or dissimilar) degrees as themselves, a negative coefficient means that dissimilar nodes are more likely to be connected. In the case of the WION, all the coefficients are of very small magnitude less than 0.06, but with statistical significance as shown in Panel (B) of Fig 3. Notice that when calculating the assortativity for in-degree, out-degree, and total-degree, respectively, we consider the nodes as the neighbors of a given node if they are connected with the given node by only incoming edges, by only outgoing edges, and by either incoming or outgoing edges, respectively. In contrast, Carvalho [14] defines the neighborhood solely on the basis of the incoming edges and finds a positive assortative relationship. One possible explanation of the negativity is that high-degree industries such as construction often take inputs (or supply outputs) from (or to) low-degree industries such as transport services. Moreover, the spatial constraints (each node has only few neighboring nodes in the same country) introduce degree-degree anticorrelations (disassortativity) since high degree sectors are in different countries and the probability to connect decays with distance [34]. Second, all the coefficients show an increasing trend before 2007 and a significant decline after 2007. The behavior of the assortativity measures seems to be correlated with the trend of the foreign share in the inter-industrial transactions over time (Fig 4). That is, we can calculate the foreign share of the intermediate transactions as the percentage of inputs from foreign origins (or equivalently, the percentage of outputs to foreign destinations) of the transactions matrix Z of the 40 WIOD economies. Same as observed in assortativity, the foreign share of Z has a steady growth (from 9.9% in 1995 to 12.8% in 2007) before 2007 and a sharp decrease after 2007 (While the most severely depressed domestic edges during 2008–2009 in terms of the magnitude of the reduced flows are mostly within USA, the top 3 most impacted foreign edges are all from the mining industry to the coke and fuel industry and are from Canada to USA, from Netherlands to Belgium, and from Mexico to USA, respectively.). The increase in the foreign share implies more interactions across economies and hence tends to make the WION less dissortative. The opposite happens when the foreign share goes down as a result of the global financial crisis. Third, we notice that the in-degree assortativity tends to be lower than the out-degree assortativity, but there is a tendency to close the gap between the two measures. We interpret this evidence as a clear signal of the integration of production chains, that is to say, both global buying and selling hubs have now a higher chance to be connected across borders.

Bottom Line: At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions.Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages.We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Linkalab, Complex Systems Computational Laboratory, Cagliari, Italy; Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus