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Efficacy of weekly docetaxel in locally advanced cardiac angiosarcoma.

Minichillo S, Pantaleo MA, Nannini M, Coccolo F, Gatto L, Biasco G, Brandi G - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Bottom Line: Primary cardiac angiosarcoma is extremely aggressive; however, it is often misdiagnosed because of its rarity.For locally advanced tumors, doxorubicin-based chemotherapy regimens are the standard of treatment, even if the gain in term of progression-free survival is limited and is no longer than 5 months.Combined treatment with weekly docetaxel and radiotherapy may be a valid alternative for the treatment of locally advanced cardiac angiosarcoma; the combination can lead to radical surgical resections, avoiding the cumulative cardiotoxicity of antracycline-based regimens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Specialized, Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti, 9, 40138, Bologna, Italy. med.minichillo@hotmail.it.

ABSTRACT

Background: Primary cardiac angiosarcoma is extremely aggressive; however, it is often misdiagnosed because of its rarity. For locally advanced tumors, doxorubicin-based chemotherapy regimens are the standard of treatment, even if the gain in term of progression-free survival is limited and is no longer than 5 months.

Case presentation: We report the case of a Caucasian 23-year-old man with locally advanced cardiac angiosarcoma who underwent radical surgical resection after a prolonged response to weekly docetaxel and complementary radiotherapy.

Conclusion: Combined treatment with weekly docetaxel and radiotherapy may be a valid alternative for the treatment of locally advanced cardiac angiosarcoma; the combination can lead to radical surgical resections, avoiding the cumulative cardiotoxicity of antracycline-based regimens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging before neoadjuvant therapy with docetaxel.
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Fig1: Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging before neoadjuvant therapy with docetaxel.

Mentions: In April 2008, a healthy Caucasian 23-year-old man went to the emergency room for the sudden onset of dyspnea on exertion, fatigue, chest discomfort, fever, and night sweats. Upon physical examination, his vital signs were stable, with only mild tachycardia (heart rate 96/min). There were no palpable lymph nodes. Jugular venous pressure, carotid upstroke, and heart sounds were not clinically relevant. There were no appreciable murmurs. Respiratory and abdominal objective examinations were normal. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed the presence of a profuse pericardial effusion; therefore an evacuative pericardiocentesis was performed, draining approximately 900 mL of serum blood material. A subsequent chest CT scan showed a solid and expansive mass, about 8.4 cm in diameter with a partial endocavitary development in the right atrium, associated with multiple mediastinal adenopathies and three noncalcified pulmonary micronodules. An NMR scan confirmed the previous CT findings (Fig. 1), and a subsequent CT- Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan showed high glucose uptake in the mass (max standardized uptake value—SUV = 6.5). The histological examination performed by multiple biopsies of the lesion revealed a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm compatible with angiosarcoma.Fig. 1


Efficacy of weekly docetaxel in locally advanced cardiac angiosarcoma.

Minichillo S, Pantaleo MA, Nannini M, Coccolo F, Gatto L, Biasco G, Brandi G - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging before neoadjuvant therapy with docetaxel.
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519000&req=5

Fig1: Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging before neoadjuvant therapy with docetaxel.
Mentions: In April 2008, a healthy Caucasian 23-year-old man went to the emergency room for the sudden onset of dyspnea on exertion, fatigue, chest discomfort, fever, and night sweats. Upon physical examination, his vital signs were stable, with only mild tachycardia (heart rate 96/min). There were no palpable lymph nodes. Jugular venous pressure, carotid upstroke, and heart sounds were not clinically relevant. There were no appreciable murmurs. Respiratory and abdominal objective examinations were normal. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed the presence of a profuse pericardial effusion; therefore an evacuative pericardiocentesis was performed, draining approximately 900 mL of serum blood material. A subsequent chest CT scan showed a solid and expansive mass, about 8.4 cm in diameter with a partial endocavitary development in the right atrium, associated with multiple mediastinal adenopathies and three noncalcified pulmonary micronodules. An NMR scan confirmed the previous CT findings (Fig. 1), and a subsequent CT- Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan showed high glucose uptake in the mass (max standardized uptake value—SUV = 6.5). The histological examination performed by multiple biopsies of the lesion revealed a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm compatible with angiosarcoma.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Primary cardiac angiosarcoma is extremely aggressive; however, it is often misdiagnosed because of its rarity.For locally advanced tumors, doxorubicin-based chemotherapy regimens are the standard of treatment, even if the gain in term of progression-free survival is limited and is no longer than 5 months.Combined treatment with weekly docetaxel and radiotherapy may be a valid alternative for the treatment of locally advanced cardiac angiosarcoma; the combination can lead to radical surgical resections, avoiding the cumulative cardiotoxicity of antracycline-based regimens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Specialized, Experimental and Diagnostic Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti, 9, 40138, Bologna, Italy. med.minichillo@hotmail.it.

ABSTRACT

Background: Primary cardiac angiosarcoma is extremely aggressive; however, it is often misdiagnosed because of its rarity. For locally advanced tumors, doxorubicin-based chemotherapy regimens are the standard of treatment, even if the gain in term of progression-free survival is limited and is no longer than 5 months.

Case presentation: We report the case of a Caucasian 23-year-old man with locally advanced cardiac angiosarcoma who underwent radical surgical resection after a prolonged response to weekly docetaxel and complementary radiotherapy.

Conclusion: Combined treatment with weekly docetaxel and radiotherapy may be a valid alternative for the treatment of locally advanced cardiac angiosarcoma; the combination can lead to radical surgical resections, avoiding the cumulative cardiotoxicity of antracycline-based regimens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus