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Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

Reynolds V, Lloyd AW, English CJ, Lyons P, Dodd H, Hobaiter C, Newton-Fisher N, Mullins C, Lamon N, Schel AM, Fallon B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals.We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals.We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Anthropology, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom; Budongo Conservation Field Station, Masindi, Uganda.

ABSTRACT
Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

No MeSH data available.


Adult female Nambi (L) using a leaf-sponge at waterhole, watched by 10-yr old juvenile Karo (R) (Photo: C. Hobaiter).
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pone.0134075.g004: Adult female Nambi (L) using a leaf-sponge at waterhole, watched by 10-yr old juvenile Karo (R) (Photo: C. Hobaiter).

Mentions: In addition to obtaining clay directly from the clay holes with their fingers, chimpanzees were observed obtaining clay-rich water using leaf sponges and by drinking directly with the mouth (Figs 3 and 4 and S2 Video). This waterhole was located in clay soil below the roots of two adjoining trees of different species, Cynometra alexandri and Mimusops bagshawei. The leaf sponges were dipped into the water, placed in the mouth, and sucked or chewed before being discarded.


Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

Reynolds V, Lloyd AW, English CJ, Lyons P, Dodd H, Hobaiter C, Newton-Fisher N, Mullins C, Lamon N, Schel AM, Fallon B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Adult female Nambi (L) using a leaf-sponge at waterhole, watched by 10-yr old juvenile Karo (R) (Photo: C. Hobaiter).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4517816&req=5

pone.0134075.g004: Adult female Nambi (L) using a leaf-sponge at waterhole, watched by 10-yr old juvenile Karo (R) (Photo: C. Hobaiter).
Mentions: In addition to obtaining clay directly from the clay holes with their fingers, chimpanzees were observed obtaining clay-rich water using leaf sponges and by drinking directly with the mouth (Figs 3 and 4 and S2 Video). This waterhole was located in clay soil below the roots of two adjoining trees of different species, Cynometra alexandri and Mimusops bagshawei. The leaf sponges were dipped into the water, placed in the mouth, and sucked or chewed before being discarded.

Bottom Line: We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals.We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals.We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Anthropology, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom; Budongo Conservation Field Station, Masindi, Uganda.

ABSTRACT
Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

No MeSH data available.