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Coronectomy of Deeply Impacted Lower Third Molar: Incidence of Outcomes and Complications after One Year Follow-Up.

Agbaje JO, Heijsters G, Salem AS, Van Slycke S, Schepers S, Politis C, Vrielinck L - J Oral Maxillofac Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Coronectomy was performed in these patients.The results indicate that coronectomy can be considered a reasonable and safe treatment alternative for patients who demonstrate elevated risk for injury to the inferior alveolar nerve with removal of the third molars.Coronectomy did not increase the incidence of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and would be safer than complete extraction in situations in which the root of the mandibular third molar overlaps or is in close proximity to the mandibular canal.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: OMFS-IMPATH Research Group, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University Leuven, Leuven Belgium. ; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, St. John's Hospital, Genk Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The purpose of present study was to assess the surgical management of impacted third molar with proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve and complications associated with coronectomy in a series of patients undergoing third molar surgery.

Material and methods: The position of the mandibular canal in relation to the mandibular third molar region and mandibular foramen in the front part of the mandible (i.e., third molar in close proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve [IAN] or not) was identified on panoramic radiographs of patients scheduled for third molar extraction.

Results: Close proximity to the IAN was observed in 64 patients (35 females, 29 males) with an impacted mandibular third molar. Coronectomy was performed in these patients. The most common complication was tooth migration away from the mandibular canal (n = 14), followed by root exposure (n = 5). Re-operation to remove the root was performed in cases with periapical infection and root exposure.

Conclusions: The results indicate that coronectomy can be considered a reasonable and safe treatment alternative for patients who demonstrate elevated risk for injury to the inferior alveolar nerve with removal of the third molars. Coronectomy did not increase the incidence of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and would be safer than complete extraction in situations in which the root of the mandibular third molar overlaps or is in close proximity to the mandibular canal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age distribution of coronectomy patients.
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fig4: Age distribution of coronectomy patients.

Mentions: The age distribution of the patients is presented in Figure 4. None of the patients treated with coronectomy had lingual nerve nor IAN impairment. Eighteen coronectomy sites in 12 subjects (18.75%) presented with complications. The most common complication in our series was tooth migration away from the IAN (n = 14), followed by root exposure (n = 5) then delay healing, periapical infection and pain (n = 4 sites each). Some sites present with more than one complication. Re-operation to remove the root was performed in cases that presented with root exposure and periapical infection (Table 1).


Coronectomy of Deeply Impacted Lower Third Molar: Incidence of Outcomes and Complications after One Year Follow-Up.

Agbaje JO, Heijsters G, Salem AS, Van Slycke S, Schepers S, Politis C, Vrielinck L - J Oral Maxillofac Res (2015)

Age distribution of coronectomy patients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4516853&req=5

fig4: Age distribution of coronectomy patients.
Mentions: The age distribution of the patients is presented in Figure 4. None of the patients treated with coronectomy had lingual nerve nor IAN impairment. Eighteen coronectomy sites in 12 subjects (18.75%) presented with complications. The most common complication in our series was tooth migration away from the IAN (n = 14), followed by root exposure (n = 5) then delay healing, periapical infection and pain (n = 4 sites each). Some sites present with more than one complication. Re-operation to remove the root was performed in cases that presented with root exposure and periapical infection (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Coronectomy was performed in these patients.The results indicate that coronectomy can be considered a reasonable and safe treatment alternative for patients who demonstrate elevated risk for injury to the inferior alveolar nerve with removal of the third molars.Coronectomy did not increase the incidence of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and would be safer than complete extraction in situations in which the root of the mandibular third molar overlaps or is in close proximity to the mandibular canal.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: OMFS-IMPATH Research Group, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University Leuven, Leuven Belgium. ; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, St. John's Hospital, Genk Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The purpose of present study was to assess the surgical management of impacted third molar with proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve and complications associated with coronectomy in a series of patients undergoing third molar surgery.

Material and methods: The position of the mandibular canal in relation to the mandibular third molar region and mandibular foramen in the front part of the mandible (i.e., third molar in close proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve [IAN] or not) was identified on panoramic radiographs of patients scheduled for third molar extraction.

Results: Close proximity to the IAN was observed in 64 patients (35 females, 29 males) with an impacted mandibular third molar. Coronectomy was performed in these patients. The most common complication was tooth migration away from the mandibular canal (n = 14), followed by root exposure (n = 5). Re-operation to remove the root was performed in cases with periapical infection and root exposure.

Conclusions: The results indicate that coronectomy can be considered a reasonable and safe treatment alternative for patients who demonstrate elevated risk for injury to the inferior alveolar nerve with removal of the third molars. Coronectomy did not increase the incidence of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve and would be safer than complete extraction in situations in which the root of the mandibular third molar overlaps or is in close proximity to the mandibular canal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus