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Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts.

Chu CC, Zavala JA, Spencer JL, Curzi MJ, Fields CJ, Drnevich J, Siegfried BD, Seufferheld MJ - Evol Appl (2015)

Bottom Line: Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype.Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations.These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana, IL, USA.

ABSTRACT
The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host-microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Expression patterns of modules whose expression is similar between rotation-resistant (RR) WCR and WCR from Ames, Iowa (yet different from other WT-WCR), under at least one dietary condition. These data are shaded by the dietary treatments, while the phenotypic groups are indicated above/below the figures. The bar heights represent eigengene values of the Illumina sequencing samples. Modules J and K did not have a significant ‘phenotype × diet’ interaction in a two-way anova test. The remaining modules had significant interactions and were subjected to simple main effect tests; the diets in which the eigengene values exhibit the pattern of interest are labeled next to (or below) their module IDs. CR, corn; SB8, eight hours on soybean; SB36, thirty-six hours on soybean.
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fig03: Expression patterns of modules whose expression is similar between rotation-resistant (RR) WCR and WCR from Ames, Iowa (yet different from other WT-WCR), under at least one dietary condition. These data are shaded by the dietary treatments, while the phenotypic groups are indicated above/below the figures. The bar heights represent eigengene values of the Illumina sequencing samples. Modules J and K did not have a significant ‘phenotype × diet’ interaction in a two-way anova test. The remaining modules had significant interactions and were subjected to simple main effect tests; the diets in which the eigengene values exhibit the pattern of interest are labeled next to (or below) their module IDs. CR, corn; SB8, eight hours on soybean; SB36, thirty-six hours on soybean.

Mentions: A previous study found that WCR collected from Ames, Iowa, exhibited slightly higher tolerance of soybean than other WT populations examined (Curzi et al. 2012). Therefore, we searched for gene modules (with enriched biological process or function ontology terms) that may contribute to such a change. Five modules were identified showing similar expression patterns between IA and RR samples but differences in expression from WT samples. The isotigs/contigs included in these modules (Modules J to N; Fig.3 and Table2) represent 23.6% of the differentially expressed contigs/isotigs in our dataset. Modules J and K exhibited such patterns regardless of the dietary conditions, whereas the expression of Modules L, M, and N showed such patterns only when insects were fed on soybean diets. Genes belonging to these modules were related with various metabolic processes (Module J, K, and L), transmembrane transport (Module M), regulation of proteolysis (Module J), neuron homeostasis (Module N), and other biological processes/functions (Table2).


Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts.

Chu CC, Zavala JA, Spencer JL, Curzi MJ, Fields CJ, Drnevich J, Siegfried BD, Seufferheld MJ - Evol Appl (2015)

Expression patterns of modules whose expression is similar between rotation-resistant (RR) WCR and WCR from Ames, Iowa (yet different from other WT-WCR), under at least one dietary condition. These data are shaded by the dietary treatments, while the phenotypic groups are indicated above/below the figures. The bar heights represent eigengene values of the Illumina sequencing samples. Modules J and K did not have a significant ‘phenotype × diet’ interaction in a two-way anova test. The remaining modules had significant interactions and were subjected to simple main effect tests; the diets in which the eigengene values exhibit the pattern of interest are labeled next to (or below) their module IDs. CR, corn; SB8, eight hours on soybean; SB36, thirty-six hours on soybean.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4516421&req=5

fig03: Expression patterns of modules whose expression is similar between rotation-resistant (RR) WCR and WCR from Ames, Iowa (yet different from other WT-WCR), under at least one dietary condition. These data are shaded by the dietary treatments, while the phenotypic groups are indicated above/below the figures. The bar heights represent eigengene values of the Illumina sequencing samples. Modules J and K did not have a significant ‘phenotype × diet’ interaction in a two-way anova test. The remaining modules had significant interactions and were subjected to simple main effect tests; the diets in which the eigengene values exhibit the pattern of interest are labeled next to (or below) their module IDs. CR, corn; SB8, eight hours on soybean; SB36, thirty-six hours on soybean.
Mentions: A previous study found that WCR collected from Ames, Iowa, exhibited slightly higher tolerance of soybean than other WT populations examined (Curzi et al. 2012). Therefore, we searched for gene modules (with enriched biological process or function ontology terms) that may contribute to such a change. Five modules were identified showing similar expression patterns between IA and RR samples but differences in expression from WT samples. The isotigs/contigs included in these modules (Modules J to N; Fig.3 and Table2) represent 23.6% of the differentially expressed contigs/isotigs in our dataset. Modules J and K exhibited such patterns regardless of the dietary conditions, whereas the expression of Modules L, M, and N showed such patterns only when insects were fed on soybean diets. Genes belonging to these modules were related with various metabolic processes (Module J, K, and L), transmembrane transport (Module M), regulation of proteolysis (Module J), neuron homeostasis (Module N), and other biological processes/functions (Table2).

Bottom Line: Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype.Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations.These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana, IL, USA.

ABSTRACT
The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host-microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus