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PM2.5 in Urban and Rural Nursery Schools in Upper Silesia, Poland: Trace Elements Analysis.

Mainka A, Zajusz-Zubek E, Kaczmarek K - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Among air pollutants, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is of the greatest interest mainly due to its strong association with acute and chronic effects on children's health.The results indicate there is a problem with elevated concentrations of PM2.5 inside the examined classrooms.PCA allowed the identification of the three components: anthropogenic and geogenic sources (37.2%), soil dust contaminated by sewage sludge dumping (18.6%) and vehicular emissions (19.5%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Air Protection, Silesian University of Technology, 22B Konarskiego St., Gliwice 44-100, Poland. Anna.Mainka@polsl.pl.

ABSTRACT
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in nursery schools is an emerging public health challenge. Particular attention should be paid to younger children, because they are more vulnerable to air pollution than older children. Among air pollutants, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is of the greatest interest mainly due to its strong association with acute and chronic effects on children's health. In this paper, we present concentrations of PM2.5 and the composition of its trace elements at naturally ventilated nursery schools located in the area of Gliwice, Poland. The nursery schools were selected to characterize areas with different degrees of urbanization and traffic densities during the winter and spring seasons. The results indicate there is a problem with elevated concentrations of PM2.5 inside the examined classrooms. The children's exposure to trace elements was different based on localization and season. PM2.5 concentration and its trace element composition have been studied using correlation coefficients between the different trace elements, the enrichment factor (EF) and principal component analysis (PCA). PCA allowed the identification of the three components: anthropogenic and geogenic sources (37.2%), soil dust contaminated by sewage sludge dumping (18.6%) and vehicular emissions (19.5%).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PM2.5 concentration measured indoors and outdoors.
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ijerph-12-07990-f002: PM2.5 concentration measured indoors and outdoors.

Mentions: The indoor and outdoor PM2.5 mass concentrations for selected nursery schools measured during winter and spring (Figure 2) varied from 19.37 to 66.36 µg/m3 in outdoor samples and from 53.09 to 96.67 µg/m3 in indoor samples. The average concentrations of indoor and outdoor samples were 73.90 µg/m3 and 38.36 µg/m3, respectively. The outdoor average concentrations of PM2.5 are typical for the Upper Silesia region [31,33]. The indoor average concentrations of PM2.5 samples collected in Portuguese preschools were found to be at similar levels during the occupation of children at rural nursery schools: 100 ± 71 µg/m3 [34]. Meanwhile, the PM2.5 hourly average concentrations varied from 9.03 to 28.06 µg/m3 [10] and from 19.70 to 34.69 µg/m3 [3,10], respectively, in the classrooms located in rural and urban nursery schools. Meanwhile, in Swedish preschools equipped with mechanical ventilation, the PM2.5 concentrations were significantly lower, between 3.2 and 9.3 µg/m3 [11].


PM2.5 in Urban and Rural Nursery Schools in Upper Silesia, Poland: Trace Elements Analysis.

Mainka A, Zajusz-Zubek E, Kaczmarek K - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

PM2.5 concentration measured indoors and outdoors.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4515705&req=5

ijerph-12-07990-f002: PM2.5 concentration measured indoors and outdoors.
Mentions: The indoor and outdoor PM2.5 mass concentrations for selected nursery schools measured during winter and spring (Figure 2) varied from 19.37 to 66.36 µg/m3 in outdoor samples and from 53.09 to 96.67 µg/m3 in indoor samples. The average concentrations of indoor and outdoor samples were 73.90 µg/m3 and 38.36 µg/m3, respectively. The outdoor average concentrations of PM2.5 are typical for the Upper Silesia region [31,33]. The indoor average concentrations of PM2.5 samples collected in Portuguese preschools were found to be at similar levels during the occupation of children at rural nursery schools: 100 ± 71 µg/m3 [34]. Meanwhile, the PM2.5 hourly average concentrations varied from 9.03 to 28.06 µg/m3 [10] and from 19.70 to 34.69 µg/m3 [3,10], respectively, in the classrooms located in rural and urban nursery schools. Meanwhile, in Swedish preschools equipped with mechanical ventilation, the PM2.5 concentrations were significantly lower, between 3.2 and 9.3 µg/m3 [11].

Bottom Line: Among air pollutants, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is of the greatest interest mainly due to its strong association with acute and chronic effects on children's health.The results indicate there is a problem with elevated concentrations of PM2.5 inside the examined classrooms.PCA allowed the identification of the three components: anthropogenic and geogenic sources (37.2%), soil dust contaminated by sewage sludge dumping (18.6%) and vehicular emissions (19.5%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Air Protection, Silesian University of Technology, 22B Konarskiego St., Gliwice 44-100, Poland. Anna.Mainka@polsl.pl.

ABSTRACT
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in nursery schools is an emerging public health challenge. Particular attention should be paid to younger children, because they are more vulnerable to air pollution than older children. Among air pollutants, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is of the greatest interest mainly due to its strong association with acute and chronic effects on children's health. In this paper, we present concentrations of PM2.5 and the composition of its trace elements at naturally ventilated nursery schools located in the area of Gliwice, Poland. The nursery schools were selected to characterize areas with different degrees of urbanization and traffic densities during the winter and spring seasons. The results indicate there is a problem with elevated concentrations of PM2.5 inside the examined classrooms. The children's exposure to trace elements was different based on localization and season. PM2.5 concentration and its trace element composition have been studied using correlation coefficients between the different trace elements, the enrichment factor (EF) and principal component analysis (PCA). PCA allowed the identification of the three components: anthropogenic and geogenic sources (37.2%), soil dust contaminated by sewage sludge dumping (18.6%) and vehicular emissions (19.5%).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus