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Anthropogenic Factors Are the Major Cause of Hospital Admission of a Threatened Species, the Grey-Headed Flying Fox (Pteropus poliocephalus), in Victoria, Australia.

Scheelings TF, Frith SE - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Cases were categorised based on presenting signs and outcomes determined.Anthropogenic factors (63.7%) were a major cause of flying fox admissions with entanglement in fruit netting the most significant risk for bats (36.8%).This study highlights the effects of urbanisation on wild animal populations and a need for continued public education in order to reduce morbidity and mortality of wildlife, especially threatened species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Australian Wildlife Health Centre, Healesville Sanctuary, Healesville, Victoria, Australia.

ABSTRACT
To determine the reasons for presentation and outcomes of hospitalised grey-headed flying foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) in Victoria, Australia, a retrospective analysis was performed on 532 records from two wildlife hospitals. Cases were categorised based on presenting signs and outcomes determined. Anthropogenic factors (63.7%) were a major cause of flying fox admissions with entanglement in fruit netting the most significant risk for bats (36.8%). Overall the mortality rate for flying fox admissions was 59.3%. This study highlights the effects of urbanisation on wild animal populations and a need for continued public education in order to reduce morbidity and mortality of wildlife, especially threatened species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Admissions of grey-headed flying foxes by year.Admissions of grey-headed flying-foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) by year to two veterinary medical centres in Melbourne, Australia.
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pone.0133638.g002: Admissions of grey-headed flying foxes by year.Admissions of grey-headed flying-foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) by year to two veterinary medical centres in Melbourne, Australia.

Mentions: The sex of grey-headed flying foxes was recorded for 489 (91.9%) individuals. Males (n = 274, 51.5%) were more likely to be presented than females (n = 215, 40.4%) (P = 0.0004). The age distribution showed that 82.1% (n = 437) were adult compared with 17.9% (n = 95) which were juvenile (P < 0.0001). A significantly higher number of cases were presented in early summer to autumn (December to April) 348 (65.4%), with comparatively few cases admitted during winter or spring (May to November) 174 (32.7%) (P < 0.0001) (Fig 1). Peak admissions occurred in 2014 but prior to this there was no obvious trend (Fig 2).


Anthropogenic Factors Are the Major Cause of Hospital Admission of a Threatened Species, the Grey-Headed Flying Fox (Pteropus poliocephalus), in Victoria, Australia.

Scheelings TF, Frith SE - PLoS ONE (2015)

Admissions of grey-headed flying foxes by year.Admissions of grey-headed flying-foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) by year to two veterinary medical centres in Melbourne, Australia.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514772&req=5

pone.0133638.g002: Admissions of grey-headed flying foxes by year.Admissions of grey-headed flying-foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) by year to two veterinary medical centres in Melbourne, Australia.
Mentions: The sex of grey-headed flying foxes was recorded for 489 (91.9%) individuals. Males (n = 274, 51.5%) were more likely to be presented than females (n = 215, 40.4%) (P = 0.0004). The age distribution showed that 82.1% (n = 437) were adult compared with 17.9% (n = 95) which were juvenile (P < 0.0001). A significantly higher number of cases were presented in early summer to autumn (December to April) 348 (65.4%), with comparatively few cases admitted during winter or spring (May to November) 174 (32.7%) (P < 0.0001) (Fig 1). Peak admissions occurred in 2014 but prior to this there was no obvious trend (Fig 2).

Bottom Line: Cases were categorised based on presenting signs and outcomes determined.Anthropogenic factors (63.7%) were a major cause of flying fox admissions with entanglement in fruit netting the most significant risk for bats (36.8%).This study highlights the effects of urbanisation on wild animal populations and a need for continued public education in order to reduce morbidity and mortality of wildlife, especially threatened species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Australian Wildlife Health Centre, Healesville Sanctuary, Healesville, Victoria, Australia.

ABSTRACT
To determine the reasons for presentation and outcomes of hospitalised grey-headed flying foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) in Victoria, Australia, a retrospective analysis was performed on 532 records from two wildlife hospitals. Cases were categorised based on presenting signs and outcomes determined. Anthropogenic factors (63.7%) were a major cause of flying fox admissions with entanglement in fruit netting the most significant risk for bats (36.8%). Overall the mortality rate for flying fox admissions was 59.3%. This study highlights the effects of urbanisation on wild animal populations and a need for continued public education in order to reduce morbidity and mortality of wildlife, especially threatened species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus