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The Neighbourhood Built Environment and Trajectories of Depression Symptom Episodes in Adults: A Latent Class Growth Analysis.

Gariepy G, Thombs BD, Kestens Y, Kaufman JS, Blair A, Schmitz N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We used 10 years of data collection (2000/01-2010/11) from the Canadian National Population Health Study (n = 7114).We assessed the presence of local parks, healthy food stores, fast food restaurants, health services and cultural services using geospatial data.Future intervention studies are recommended to make policy recommendations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To investigate the effect of the neighbourhood built environment on trajectories of depression symptom episodes in adults from the general Canadian population.

Research design and methods: We used 10 years of data collection (2000/01-2010/11) from the Canadian National Population Health Study (n = 7114). Episodes of depression symptoms were identified using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short-Form. We assessed the presence of local parks, healthy food stores, fast food restaurants, health services and cultural services using geospatial data. We used latent class growth modelling to identify different trajectories of depression symptom episodes in the sample and tested for the effect of neighbourhood variables on the trajectories over time.

Results: We uncovered three distinct trajectories of depression symptom episodes: low prevalence (76.2% of the sample), moderate prevalence (19.2%) and high prevalence of depression symptom episodes (2.8%). The presence of any neighbourhood service (healthy food store, fast-food restaurant, health service, except for cultural service) was significantly associated with a lower probability of a depression symptom episode for those following a trajectory of low prevalence of depression symptom episodes. The presence of a local park was also a significant protective factor in trajectory groups with both low and moderate prevalence of depression symptom episodes. Neighbourhood characteristics did not significantly affect the trajectory of high prevalence of depression symptom episodes.

Conclusions: For individuals following a trajectory of low and moderate prevalence of depression symptom episodes, the neighbourhood built environment was associated with a shift in the trajectory of depression symptom episodes. Future intervention studies are recommended to make policy recommendations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trajectories of prevalence of depression symptom episodes over time in the NPHS (2000/01-2010/11) with and without presence of parks in the neighbourhood during the study period.Trajectories that include time-varying presence of parks in the growth model. The dashed lines represent trajectories when presence of park is set to “no park” across the study period. The solid lines represent trajectories when presence of park is set to “presence of park” across the study period.
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pone.0133603.g002: Trajectories of prevalence of depression symptom episodes over time in the NPHS (2000/01-2010/11) with and without presence of parks in the neighbourhood during the study period.Trajectories that include time-varying presence of parks in the growth model. The dashed lines represent trajectories when presence of park is set to “no park” across the study period. The solid lines represent trajectories when presence of park is set to “presence of park” across the study period.

Mentions: When introducing time-varying neighbourhood characteristics into the LCGM (Table 2), the presence of any neighbourhood service (including presence of parks, healthy food stores, fast food restaurants and health services), except for cultural services, was significantly associated with a trajectory shift towards a lower probability of having a depression symptom episode in those already following a low probability trajectory of depression symptom episodes. The presence of parks was also significantly associated with a shift towards a lower probability of a depression symptom episode in those following a moderate probability trajectory. Fig 2 illustrates the probability of depression symptom episodes when local parks are modelled as absent vs. present throughout the study period. Point estimates suggest that the presence of parks was associated with a 95% lower odds of having a depression symptom episode for the group following a low probability trajectory of depression symptom episodes and a 26% lower odds for the group following moderate probability of depression symptom episodes (Table 2). None of the neighbourhood characteristics were significantly associated with the trajectory of high prevalence of depression symptom episodes.


The Neighbourhood Built Environment and Trajectories of Depression Symptom Episodes in Adults: A Latent Class Growth Analysis.

Gariepy G, Thombs BD, Kestens Y, Kaufman JS, Blair A, Schmitz N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Trajectories of prevalence of depression symptom episodes over time in the NPHS (2000/01-2010/11) with and without presence of parks in the neighbourhood during the study period.Trajectories that include time-varying presence of parks in the growth model. The dashed lines represent trajectories when presence of park is set to “no park” across the study period. The solid lines represent trajectories when presence of park is set to “presence of park” across the study period.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514736&req=5

pone.0133603.g002: Trajectories of prevalence of depression symptom episodes over time in the NPHS (2000/01-2010/11) with and without presence of parks in the neighbourhood during the study period.Trajectories that include time-varying presence of parks in the growth model. The dashed lines represent trajectories when presence of park is set to “no park” across the study period. The solid lines represent trajectories when presence of park is set to “presence of park” across the study period.
Mentions: When introducing time-varying neighbourhood characteristics into the LCGM (Table 2), the presence of any neighbourhood service (including presence of parks, healthy food stores, fast food restaurants and health services), except for cultural services, was significantly associated with a trajectory shift towards a lower probability of having a depression symptom episode in those already following a low probability trajectory of depression symptom episodes. The presence of parks was also significantly associated with a shift towards a lower probability of a depression symptom episode in those following a moderate probability trajectory. Fig 2 illustrates the probability of depression symptom episodes when local parks are modelled as absent vs. present throughout the study period. Point estimates suggest that the presence of parks was associated with a 95% lower odds of having a depression symptom episode for the group following a low probability trajectory of depression symptom episodes and a 26% lower odds for the group following moderate probability of depression symptom episodes (Table 2). None of the neighbourhood characteristics were significantly associated with the trajectory of high prevalence of depression symptom episodes.

Bottom Line: We used 10 years of data collection (2000/01-2010/11) from the Canadian National Population Health Study (n = 7114).We assessed the presence of local parks, healthy food stores, fast food restaurants, health services and cultural services using geospatial data.Future intervention studies are recommended to make policy recommendations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To investigate the effect of the neighbourhood built environment on trajectories of depression symptom episodes in adults from the general Canadian population.

Research design and methods: We used 10 years of data collection (2000/01-2010/11) from the Canadian National Population Health Study (n = 7114). Episodes of depression symptoms were identified using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short-Form. We assessed the presence of local parks, healthy food stores, fast food restaurants, health services and cultural services using geospatial data. We used latent class growth modelling to identify different trajectories of depression symptom episodes in the sample and tested for the effect of neighbourhood variables on the trajectories over time.

Results: We uncovered three distinct trajectories of depression symptom episodes: low prevalence (76.2% of the sample), moderate prevalence (19.2%) and high prevalence of depression symptom episodes (2.8%). The presence of any neighbourhood service (healthy food store, fast-food restaurant, health service, except for cultural service) was significantly associated with a lower probability of a depression symptom episode for those following a trajectory of low prevalence of depression symptom episodes. The presence of a local park was also a significant protective factor in trajectory groups with both low and moderate prevalence of depression symptom episodes. Neighbourhood characteristics did not significantly affect the trajectory of high prevalence of depression symptom episodes.

Conclusions: For individuals following a trajectory of low and moderate prevalence of depression symptom episodes, the neighbourhood built environment was associated with a shift in the trajectory of depression symptom episodes. Future intervention studies are recommended to make policy recommendations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus