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The Neighbourhood Built Environment and Trajectories of Depression Symptom Episodes in Adults: A Latent Class Growth Analysis.

Gariepy G, Thombs BD, Kestens Y, Kaufman JS, Blair A, Schmitz N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We used 10 years of data collection (2000/01-2010/11) from the Canadian National Population Health Study (n = 7114).We assessed the presence of local parks, healthy food stores, fast food restaurants, health services and cultural services using geospatial data.Future intervention studies are recommended to make policy recommendations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To investigate the effect of the neighbourhood built environment on trajectories of depression symptom episodes in adults from the general Canadian population.

Research design and methods: We used 10 years of data collection (2000/01-2010/11) from the Canadian National Population Health Study (n = 7114). Episodes of depression symptoms were identified using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short-Form. We assessed the presence of local parks, healthy food stores, fast food restaurants, health services and cultural services using geospatial data. We used latent class growth modelling to identify different trajectories of depression symptom episodes in the sample and tested for the effect of neighbourhood variables on the trajectories over time.

Results: We uncovered three distinct trajectories of depression symptom episodes: low prevalence (76.2% of the sample), moderate prevalence (19.2%) and high prevalence of depression symptom episodes (2.8%). The presence of any neighbourhood service (healthy food store, fast-food restaurant, health service, except for cultural service) was significantly associated with a lower probability of a depression symptom episode for those following a trajectory of low prevalence of depression symptom episodes. The presence of a local park was also a significant protective factor in trajectory groups with both low and moderate prevalence of depression symptom episodes. Neighbourhood characteristics did not significantly affect the trajectory of high prevalence of depression symptom episodes.

Conclusions: For individuals following a trajectory of low and moderate prevalence of depression symptom episodes, the neighbourhood built environment was associated with a shift in the trajectory of depression symptom episodes. Future intervention studies are recommended to make policy recommendations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trajectories of probability of depression symptom episodes over time in the NPHS (2000/01-2010/11).Trajectories from a 3-class latent class growth model incorporating age, sex, marital status, education, income adequacy, childhood life events, chronic condition and family history of depression. The red line represents the trajectory with high prevalence of depression symptom episodes; the green line, moderate prevalence; the blue line, low prevalence.
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pone.0133603.g001: Trajectories of probability of depression symptom episodes over time in the NPHS (2000/01-2010/11).Trajectories from a 3-class latent class growth model incorporating age, sex, marital status, education, income adequacy, childhood life events, chronic condition and family history of depression. The red line represents the trajectory with high prevalence of depression symptom episodes; the green line, moderate prevalence; the blue line, low prevalence.

Mentions: We selected a three-class solution for the LCGM, based on fit indices (S2 and S3 Tables), interpretability, and meaningfulness. The final model included three linear trajectories (Fig 1). Associations of sociodemographic and health variables with trajectory groups are presented in Table 1. Trajectory 1 was the largest class (76.2% of the sample; average probability of class membership: 0.88, 99% confidence interval (CI) 0.88–0.89) and represented individuals who followed a trajectory of low prevalence of depression symptom episodes during the study period. Expected prevalence of depression symptom episodes stayed consistently below 1% for every survey cycle within this group. Compared to the two other groups, members of this group were on average older and less likely to have a family history of depression, a chronic condition and to report a traumatic childhood life event. Trajectory 2 represented individuals who had a moderate prevalence of depression symptom episodes (19.2% of the sample; average probability of class membership: 0.74, 99% CI 0.73–0.75). Expected prevalence of depression symptom episodes for trajectory 2 was 20%, 19%, 24%, 15%, 21% and 17% in 2000/01, 2002/03, 2004/05, 2006/07, 2008/09 and 2010/11, respectively. The average member of this group had 1.2 episodes of depression symptoms during the study. Compared to trajectory 1, those in trajectory 2 were younger, and more likely to be a woman. Trajectory 3 grouped individuals who had a high prevalence of depression symptom episodes during the study (2.8% of the sample; average probability of class membership: 0.80, 99% CI 0.76–0.83). Expected prevalence of depression symptom episodes for trajectory 3 was 59%, 68%, 61%, 62%, 62% and 66% in 2000/01, 2002/03, 2004/05, 2006/07, 2008/09 and 2010/11, respectively. Members of this group had an average of 3.8 events of depression symptoms during the study. Compared to trajectory 1, individuals who followed trajectory 3 were younger, less likely to have a partner and more likely to have low household income adequacy. Members of this group were also likelier than any other group to report a family history of depression (Wald test comparing parameter estimate of group 3 vs group 1, p<0.001; and group 3 vs group 2, p = 0.05).


The Neighbourhood Built Environment and Trajectories of Depression Symptom Episodes in Adults: A Latent Class Growth Analysis.

Gariepy G, Thombs BD, Kestens Y, Kaufman JS, Blair A, Schmitz N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Trajectories of probability of depression symptom episodes over time in the NPHS (2000/01-2010/11).Trajectories from a 3-class latent class growth model incorporating age, sex, marital status, education, income adequacy, childhood life events, chronic condition and family history of depression. The red line represents the trajectory with high prevalence of depression symptom episodes; the green line, moderate prevalence; the blue line, low prevalence.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514736&req=5

pone.0133603.g001: Trajectories of probability of depression symptom episodes over time in the NPHS (2000/01-2010/11).Trajectories from a 3-class latent class growth model incorporating age, sex, marital status, education, income adequacy, childhood life events, chronic condition and family history of depression. The red line represents the trajectory with high prevalence of depression symptom episodes; the green line, moderate prevalence; the blue line, low prevalence.
Mentions: We selected a three-class solution for the LCGM, based on fit indices (S2 and S3 Tables), interpretability, and meaningfulness. The final model included three linear trajectories (Fig 1). Associations of sociodemographic and health variables with trajectory groups are presented in Table 1. Trajectory 1 was the largest class (76.2% of the sample; average probability of class membership: 0.88, 99% confidence interval (CI) 0.88–0.89) and represented individuals who followed a trajectory of low prevalence of depression symptom episodes during the study period. Expected prevalence of depression symptom episodes stayed consistently below 1% for every survey cycle within this group. Compared to the two other groups, members of this group were on average older and less likely to have a family history of depression, a chronic condition and to report a traumatic childhood life event. Trajectory 2 represented individuals who had a moderate prevalence of depression symptom episodes (19.2% of the sample; average probability of class membership: 0.74, 99% CI 0.73–0.75). Expected prevalence of depression symptom episodes for trajectory 2 was 20%, 19%, 24%, 15%, 21% and 17% in 2000/01, 2002/03, 2004/05, 2006/07, 2008/09 and 2010/11, respectively. The average member of this group had 1.2 episodes of depression symptoms during the study. Compared to trajectory 1, those in trajectory 2 were younger, and more likely to be a woman. Trajectory 3 grouped individuals who had a high prevalence of depression symptom episodes during the study (2.8% of the sample; average probability of class membership: 0.80, 99% CI 0.76–0.83). Expected prevalence of depression symptom episodes for trajectory 3 was 59%, 68%, 61%, 62%, 62% and 66% in 2000/01, 2002/03, 2004/05, 2006/07, 2008/09 and 2010/11, respectively. Members of this group had an average of 3.8 events of depression symptoms during the study. Compared to trajectory 1, individuals who followed trajectory 3 were younger, less likely to have a partner and more likely to have low household income adequacy. Members of this group were also likelier than any other group to report a family history of depression (Wald test comparing parameter estimate of group 3 vs group 1, p<0.001; and group 3 vs group 2, p = 0.05).

Bottom Line: We used 10 years of data collection (2000/01-2010/11) from the Canadian National Population Health Study (n = 7114).We assessed the presence of local parks, healthy food stores, fast food restaurants, health services and cultural services using geospatial data.Future intervention studies are recommended to make policy recommendations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To investigate the effect of the neighbourhood built environment on trajectories of depression symptom episodes in adults from the general Canadian population.

Research design and methods: We used 10 years of data collection (2000/01-2010/11) from the Canadian National Population Health Study (n = 7114). Episodes of depression symptoms were identified using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short-Form. We assessed the presence of local parks, healthy food stores, fast food restaurants, health services and cultural services using geospatial data. We used latent class growth modelling to identify different trajectories of depression symptom episodes in the sample and tested for the effect of neighbourhood variables on the trajectories over time.

Results: We uncovered three distinct trajectories of depression symptom episodes: low prevalence (76.2% of the sample), moderate prevalence (19.2%) and high prevalence of depression symptom episodes (2.8%). The presence of any neighbourhood service (healthy food store, fast-food restaurant, health service, except for cultural service) was significantly associated with a lower probability of a depression symptom episode for those following a trajectory of low prevalence of depression symptom episodes. The presence of a local park was also a significant protective factor in trajectory groups with both low and moderate prevalence of depression symptom episodes. Neighbourhood characteristics did not significantly affect the trajectory of high prevalence of depression symptom episodes.

Conclusions: For individuals following a trajectory of low and moderate prevalence of depression symptom episodes, the neighbourhood built environment was associated with a shift in the trajectory of depression symptom episodes. Future intervention studies are recommended to make policy recommendations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus