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The effect of Katsura-uri (Japanese pickling melon, Cucumis melo var. conomon) and its derived ingredient methylthioacetic acid on energy metabolism during aerobic exercise.

Aoi W, Takeda K, Sasaki A, Hasegawa Y, Nakamura Y, Park EY, Sato K, Iwasa M, Nakayama A, Minamikawa M, Kobayashi Y, Shirota K, Suetome N - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: In the animal study, the effect of methylthioacetic acid (MTA), a Katsura-uri derived component was examined in mice.Immediately after running at 25 m/min for 30 min, biochemical parameters in the hind limb muscle and blood of mice were measured.These results suggest that the ingestion of Katsura-uri and/or MTA improves glucose metabolism and acidification in skeletal muscles during exercise in human and animal studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Health Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Kyoto, 606-8522 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We investigated the effect of Katsura-uri (Japanese pickling melon; Cucumis melo var. conomon) on energy metabolism during exercise in human and animal studies.

Methods: Eight healthy men (mean age, 21.4 ± 0.7 years) participated in a single-blind, crossover study. Thirty minutes after ingesting the Katsura-uri drink or placebo drink, they exercised on a cycle ergometer at 40% maximal heart rate for 30 min. Respiratory gas analysis was performed during exercise to examine oxygen consumption and substrate utilization. Blood biochemical parameters were evaluated during exercise. In the animal study, the effect of methylthioacetic acid (MTA), a Katsura-uri derived component was examined in mice. Immediately after running at 25 m/min for 30 min, biochemical parameters in the hind limb muscle and blood of mice were measured.

Results: Oxygen consumption during exercise was higher in the Katsura-uri condition (19.8 ± 3.5 mL/kg/min) than the placebo condition (18.6 ± 3.0 mL/kg/min) (P < 0.05). The elevation of blood lactate was lower in the Katsura-uri condition (1.7 ± 0.4 mM) than the placebo condition (2.2 ± 0.6 mM) 15 min after beginning exercise (P < 0.05). There was a higher positive correlation between lactate concentration and carbohydrate oxidation during exercise in the Katsura-uri condition (R(2) = 0.86) compared to the placebo condition (R(2) = 0.47). The decrease in intermuscular pH and the increase in blood lactate following exercise were prevented by MTA supplementation (250 ppm) with significant differences in the MTA-supplemented group compared to the control group.

Conclusions: These results suggest that the ingestion of Katsura-uri and/or MTA improves glucose metabolism and acidification in skeletal muscles during exercise in human and animal studies.

No MeSH data available.


The effect of Katsura-uri drink intake on oxygen consumption (a) and respiratory quotient (b), and the correlation between carbohydrate oxidation and blood lactate concentration (c) in humans. The continuous line indicates placebo, and the dotted line indicates Katsura-uri. Values are presented as the mean ± SD. *P < 0.05 vs. Rest, #P < 0.05 vs. Placebo.
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Fig1: The effect of Katsura-uri drink intake on oxygen consumption (a) and respiratory quotient (b), and the correlation between carbohydrate oxidation and blood lactate concentration (c) in humans. The continuous line indicates placebo, and the dotted line indicates Katsura-uri. Values are presented as the mean ± SD. *P < 0.05 vs. Rest, #P < 0.05 vs. Placebo.

Mentions: All subjects reached steady-state exercise intensity between 6 and 12 min after beginning exercise. The mean value of oxygen consumption did not differ between the placebo and Katsura-uri conditions; however, it was significantly higher in the Katsura-uri condition than in the placebo condition during the steady-state period of exercise (P < 0.05) (Fig. 1a). In contrast, the respiratory quotient (RQ) did not differ between the conditions or during the exercise period (Fig. 1b).Fig. 1


The effect of Katsura-uri (Japanese pickling melon, Cucumis melo var. conomon) and its derived ingredient methylthioacetic acid on energy metabolism during aerobic exercise.

Aoi W, Takeda K, Sasaki A, Hasegawa Y, Nakamura Y, Park EY, Sato K, Iwasa M, Nakayama A, Minamikawa M, Kobayashi Y, Shirota K, Suetome N - Springerplus (2015)

The effect of Katsura-uri drink intake on oxygen consumption (a) and respiratory quotient (b), and the correlation between carbohydrate oxidation and blood lactate concentration (c) in humans. The continuous line indicates placebo, and the dotted line indicates Katsura-uri. Values are presented as the mean ± SD. *P < 0.05 vs. Rest, #P < 0.05 vs. Placebo.
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514729&req=5

Fig1: The effect of Katsura-uri drink intake on oxygen consumption (a) and respiratory quotient (b), and the correlation between carbohydrate oxidation and blood lactate concentration (c) in humans. The continuous line indicates placebo, and the dotted line indicates Katsura-uri. Values are presented as the mean ± SD. *P < 0.05 vs. Rest, #P < 0.05 vs. Placebo.
Mentions: All subjects reached steady-state exercise intensity between 6 and 12 min after beginning exercise. The mean value of oxygen consumption did not differ between the placebo and Katsura-uri conditions; however, it was significantly higher in the Katsura-uri condition than in the placebo condition during the steady-state period of exercise (P < 0.05) (Fig. 1a). In contrast, the respiratory quotient (RQ) did not differ between the conditions or during the exercise period (Fig. 1b).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: In the animal study, the effect of methylthioacetic acid (MTA), a Katsura-uri derived component was examined in mice.Immediately after running at 25 m/min for 30 min, biochemical parameters in the hind limb muscle and blood of mice were measured.These results suggest that the ingestion of Katsura-uri and/or MTA improves glucose metabolism and acidification in skeletal muscles during exercise in human and animal studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Health Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Kyoto, 606-8522 Japan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We investigated the effect of Katsura-uri (Japanese pickling melon; Cucumis melo var. conomon) on energy metabolism during exercise in human and animal studies.

Methods: Eight healthy men (mean age, 21.4 ± 0.7 years) participated in a single-blind, crossover study. Thirty minutes after ingesting the Katsura-uri drink or placebo drink, they exercised on a cycle ergometer at 40% maximal heart rate for 30 min. Respiratory gas analysis was performed during exercise to examine oxygen consumption and substrate utilization. Blood biochemical parameters were evaluated during exercise. In the animal study, the effect of methylthioacetic acid (MTA), a Katsura-uri derived component was examined in mice. Immediately after running at 25 m/min for 30 min, biochemical parameters in the hind limb muscle and blood of mice were measured.

Results: Oxygen consumption during exercise was higher in the Katsura-uri condition (19.8 ± 3.5 mL/kg/min) than the placebo condition (18.6 ± 3.0 mL/kg/min) (P < 0.05). The elevation of blood lactate was lower in the Katsura-uri condition (1.7 ± 0.4 mM) than the placebo condition (2.2 ± 0.6 mM) 15 min after beginning exercise (P < 0.05). There was a higher positive correlation between lactate concentration and carbohydrate oxidation during exercise in the Katsura-uri condition (R(2) = 0.86) compared to the placebo condition (R(2) = 0.47). The decrease in intermuscular pH and the increase in blood lactate following exercise were prevented by MTA supplementation (250 ppm) with significant differences in the MTA-supplemented group compared to the control group.

Conclusions: These results suggest that the ingestion of Katsura-uri and/or MTA improves glucose metabolism and acidification in skeletal muscles during exercise in human and animal studies.

No MeSH data available.