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Kinetic study of uranium residue dissolution in ammonium carbonate media.

Kweto B, Groot DR, Stassen E, Suthiram J, Zeevaart JR - J Radioanal Nucl Chem (2014)

Bottom Line: The yield and rate of uranium extraction were found to increase as a function of both temperature, in the range of 25-60 °C, and hydrogen peroxide concentration.The extraction process was governed by chemical reaction as the activation energy was found to be 45.5 kJ/mol.The order of reaction with respect to uranium concentration was found to be approximately first order.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science & Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Lynnwood Road, Pretoria, 0002 South Africa.

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to determine the kinetics of the dissolution of a uranium residue in ammonium carbonate media. The residue is generated in the production of medical isotopes. The effects of parameters, such as varying peroxide and carbonate concentrations, dissolution time as well as temperature on the extraction rate have been separately studied. Results indicate complete dissolution of the residue at 60 °C, after 30 min, in ammonium carbonate solution enriched with hydrogen peroxide. The yield and rate of uranium extraction were found to increase as a function of both temperature, in the range of 25-60 °C, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The extraction process was governed by chemical reaction as the activation energy was found to be 45.5 kJ/mol. The order of reaction with respect to uranium concentration was found to be approximately first order.

No MeSH data available.


First order plot for uranium dioxide dissolution at different temperatures at 1 M (NH4)2CO3 and 1 M H2O2
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Fig2: First order plot for uranium dioxide dissolution at different temperatures at 1 M (NH4)2CO3 and 1 M H2O2

Mentions: From Fig. 2 below, it was found that the amount of uranium that dissolves over any experiment is small compared with the amount of uranium dioxide solid. This implies that the total solid surface area remains constant within any single test. Thus, the reaction rate is proportional to the exposed surface area of the crushed uranium dioxide pellets.Fig. 2


Kinetic study of uranium residue dissolution in ammonium carbonate media.

Kweto B, Groot DR, Stassen E, Suthiram J, Zeevaart JR - J Radioanal Nucl Chem (2014)

First order plot for uranium dioxide dissolution at different temperatures at 1 M (NH4)2CO3 and 1 M H2O2
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514662&req=5

Fig2: First order plot for uranium dioxide dissolution at different temperatures at 1 M (NH4)2CO3 and 1 M H2O2
Mentions: From Fig. 2 below, it was found that the amount of uranium that dissolves over any experiment is small compared with the amount of uranium dioxide solid. This implies that the total solid surface area remains constant within any single test. Thus, the reaction rate is proportional to the exposed surface area of the crushed uranium dioxide pellets.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: The yield and rate of uranium extraction were found to increase as a function of both temperature, in the range of 25-60 °C, and hydrogen peroxide concentration.The extraction process was governed by chemical reaction as the activation energy was found to be 45.5 kJ/mol.The order of reaction with respect to uranium concentration was found to be approximately first order.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science & Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Lynnwood Road, Pretoria, 0002 South Africa.

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to determine the kinetics of the dissolution of a uranium residue in ammonium carbonate media. The residue is generated in the production of medical isotopes. The effects of parameters, such as varying peroxide and carbonate concentrations, dissolution time as well as temperature on the extraction rate have been separately studied. Results indicate complete dissolution of the residue at 60 °C, after 30 min, in ammonium carbonate solution enriched with hydrogen peroxide. The yield and rate of uranium extraction were found to increase as a function of both temperature, in the range of 25-60 °C, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The extraction process was governed by chemical reaction as the activation energy was found to be 45.5 kJ/mol. The order of reaction with respect to uranium concentration was found to be approximately first order.

No MeSH data available.