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Intraamniotic Inflammation in Women with Preterm Prelabor Rupture of Membranes.

Musilova I, Kutová R, Pliskova L, Stepan M, Menon R, Jacobsson B, Kacerovsky M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Microbial-associated IAI (IAI with MIAC) and sterile intraamniotic inflammation (IAI alone) were found in 21% and 4%, respectively, of women with PPROM.No differences in the short-term neonatal morbidity with respect to the presence of microbial-associated IAI, sterile IAI and MIAC alone were found after adjusting for the gestational age at delivery in women with PPROM.Microbial-associated but not sterile intraamniotic inflammation is common in Caucasian women with PPROM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine Hradec Kralove, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To characterize subgroups of preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) and short-term neonatal outcomes based on the presence and absence of intraamniotic inflammation (IAI) and/or microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC).

Methods: One hundred and sixty-six Caucasian women with singleton pregnancies were included in this study. Amniotic fluid samples were obtained by transabdominal amniocentesis (n=166) and were assayed for interleukin-6 levels by a lateral flow immunoassay. The presence of Ureaplasma species, Mycoplasma hominis, Chlamydia trachomatis, and 16S rRNA was evaluated in the amniotic fluid. IAI was defined as amniotic fluid IL-6 values, measured by a point of care test, higher than 745 pg/mL.

Results: Microbial-associated IAI (IAI with MIAC) and sterile intraamniotic inflammation (IAI alone) were found in 21% and 4%, respectively, of women with PPROM. Women with microbial-associated IAI had higher microbial loads of Ureaplasma species in the amniotic fluid than women with MIAC alone. No differences in the short-term neonatal morbidity with respect to the presence of microbial-associated IAI, sterile IAI and MIAC alone were found after adjusting for the gestational age at delivery in women with PPROM.

Conclusions: Microbial-associated but not sterile intraamniotic inflammation is common in Caucasian women with PPROM. The gestational age at delivery but not the presence of inflammation affects the short-term neonatal morbidity of newborns from PPROM pregnancies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Amniotic fluid microbial loads of Ureaplasma species in preterm prelabor rupture membrane pregnancies that are complicated by the microbial-associated intraamniotic inflammation and microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity alone.
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pone.0133929.g005: Amniotic fluid microbial loads of Ureaplasma species in preterm prelabor rupture membrane pregnancies that are complicated by the microbial-associated intraamniotic inflammation and microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity alone.

Mentions: Women with the presence of microbial-associated IAI had a higher load of Ureaplasma species in the amniotic fluid than women with MIAC alone (with microbial-associated IAI: median 3.2x107 copies DNA/mL [range 4.0x103-.3.5x1010] vs. MIAC alone: median 4.0x104 copies DNA/mL [range 1.0x102-5.1x106]; p < 0.0001; Fig 5). There was a strong correlation (rho 0.71; p < 0.0001) between microbial load of Ureaplasma species and IL-6 in the amniotic fluid (Fig 6).


Intraamniotic Inflammation in Women with Preterm Prelabor Rupture of Membranes.

Musilova I, Kutová R, Pliskova L, Stepan M, Menon R, Jacobsson B, Kacerovsky M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Amniotic fluid microbial loads of Ureaplasma species in preterm prelabor rupture membrane pregnancies that are complicated by the microbial-associated intraamniotic inflammation and microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity alone.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514652&req=5

pone.0133929.g005: Amniotic fluid microbial loads of Ureaplasma species in preterm prelabor rupture membrane pregnancies that are complicated by the microbial-associated intraamniotic inflammation and microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity alone.
Mentions: Women with the presence of microbial-associated IAI had a higher load of Ureaplasma species in the amniotic fluid than women with MIAC alone (with microbial-associated IAI: median 3.2x107 copies DNA/mL [range 4.0x103-.3.5x1010] vs. MIAC alone: median 4.0x104 copies DNA/mL [range 1.0x102-5.1x106]; p < 0.0001; Fig 5). There was a strong correlation (rho 0.71; p < 0.0001) between microbial load of Ureaplasma species and IL-6 in the amniotic fluid (Fig 6).

Bottom Line: Microbial-associated IAI (IAI with MIAC) and sterile intraamniotic inflammation (IAI alone) were found in 21% and 4%, respectively, of women with PPROM.No differences in the short-term neonatal morbidity with respect to the presence of microbial-associated IAI, sterile IAI and MIAC alone were found after adjusting for the gestational age at delivery in women with PPROM.Microbial-associated but not sterile intraamniotic inflammation is common in Caucasian women with PPROM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine Hradec Kralove, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To characterize subgroups of preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) and short-term neonatal outcomes based on the presence and absence of intraamniotic inflammation (IAI) and/or microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC).

Methods: One hundred and sixty-six Caucasian women with singleton pregnancies were included in this study. Amniotic fluid samples were obtained by transabdominal amniocentesis (n=166) and were assayed for interleukin-6 levels by a lateral flow immunoassay. The presence of Ureaplasma species, Mycoplasma hominis, Chlamydia trachomatis, and 16S rRNA was evaluated in the amniotic fluid. IAI was defined as amniotic fluid IL-6 values, measured by a point of care test, higher than 745 pg/mL.

Results: Microbial-associated IAI (IAI with MIAC) and sterile intraamniotic inflammation (IAI alone) were found in 21% and 4%, respectively, of women with PPROM. Women with microbial-associated IAI had higher microbial loads of Ureaplasma species in the amniotic fluid than women with MIAC alone. No differences in the short-term neonatal morbidity with respect to the presence of microbial-associated IAI, sterile IAI and MIAC alone were found after adjusting for the gestational age at delivery in women with PPROM.

Conclusions: Microbial-associated but not sterile intraamniotic inflammation is common in Caucasian women with PPROM. The gestational age at delivery but not the presence of inflammation affects the short-term neonatal morbidity of newborns from PPROM pregnancies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus