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TRLFS study on the speciation of uranium in seepage water and pore water of heavy metal contaminated soil.

Baumann N, Arnold T, Lonschinski M - J Radioanal Nucl Chem (2011)

Bottom Line: The detected emission bands were found at 477.5, 491.8, 513.0, 537.2, 562.3, and 590.7 nm in case of the surface water samples, and were found at 477.2, 493.2, 513.8, 537.0, 562.4, and 590.0 nm in case of the soil water samples.Due to the presence of luminescence quenchers in the natural water samples the measured luminescence lifetimes of the UO2SO4(aq) species of 1.0-2.6 μs were reduced in comparison to pure uranium sulfate solutions, which show a luminescence lifetime of 4.7 μs.These results convincingly show that in the pH range of 3.2-4.0 TRLFS is a suitable and very useful technique to study the uranium speciation in naturally occurring water samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiochemistry, 01328 Dresden, Germany.

ABSTRACT

In situ leaching of uranium ores with sulfuric acid during active uranium mining activity on the Gessenheap has caused longstanding environmental problems of acid mine drainage and elevated concentrations of uranium. To study there remediation measures the test site Gessenwiese, a recultivated former uranium mining heap near Ronnenburg/East Thuringia/Germany, was installed as a part of a research program of the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena to study, among other techniques, the phytoremediation capacity of native and selected plants towards uranium. In the first step the uranium speciation in surface seepage and soil pore waters from Gessenwiese, ranging in pH from 3.2 to 4.0, were studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Both types of water samples showed mono-exponential luminescence decay, indicating the presence of only one major species. The detected emission bands were found at 477.5, 491.8, 513.0, 537.2, 562.3, and 590.7 nm in case of the surface water samples, and were found at 477.2, 493.2, 513.8, 537.0, 562.4, and 590.0 nm in case of the soil water samples. These characteristic peak maxima together with the observed mono-exponential decay indicated that the uranium speciation in the seepage and soil pore waters is dominated by the uranium (VI) sulfate species UO2SO4(aq). Due to the presence of luminescence quenchers in the natural water samples the measured luminescence lifetimes of the UO2SO4(aq) species of 1.0-2.6 μs were reduced in comparison to pure uranium sulfate solutions, which show a luminescence lifetime of 4.7 μs. These results convincingly show that in the pH range of 3.2-4.0 TRLFS is a suitable and very useful technique to study the uranium speciation in naturally occurring water samples.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Test site Gessenwiese in eastern Thuringia (left), and sample localities within test site. Coordinates are in the German grid (Gauß-Krüger zone 4)
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Fig1: Test site Gessenwiese in eastern Thuringia (left), and sample localities within test site. Coordinates are in the German grid (Gauß-Krüger zone 4)

Mentions: The surface water samples OW1 and OW2 were collected in and close to the test site Gessenwiese (see Fig. 1) from a little creek in the north of the test site on the 29th of March in 2009. Soil water samples (BW1–BW3) were taken from the site section MF 3 (Fig. 2) on the 19th of November 2009. The test field “Gessenwiese” is on the ground of a former leaching heap, a legacy of the uranium mining activity, close to Ronneburg and located between the villages Kauern and Grobsdorf (eastern Thuringia). The top of leaching heap was removed and replace by approximately one meter thick soil cover. A more detailed description of the history and composition of the Gessenwiese are found by [2].Fig. 1


TRLFS study on the speciation of uranium in seepage water and pore water of heavy metal contaminated soil.

Baumann N, Arnold T, Lonschinski M - J Radioanal Nucl Chem (2011)

Test site Gessenwiese in eastern Thuringia (left), and sample localities within test site. Coordinates are in the German grid (Gauß-Krüger zone 4)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514636&req=5

Fig1: Test site Gessenwiese in eastern Thuringia (left), and sample localities within test site. Coordinates are in the German grid (Gauß-Krüger zone 4)
Mentions: The surface water samples OW1 and OW2 were collected in and close to the test site Gessenwiese (see Fig. 1) from a little creek in the north of the test site on the 29th of March in 2009. Soil water samples (BW1–BW3) were taken from the site section MF 3 (Fig. 2) on the 19th of November 2009. The test field “Gessenwiese” is on the ground of a former leaching heap, a legacy of the uranium mining activity, close to Ronneburg and located between the villages Kauern and Grobsdorf (eastern Thuringia). The top of leaching heap was removed and replace by approximately one meter thick soil cover. A more detailed description of the history and composition of the Gessenwiese are found by [2].Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The detected emission bands were found at 477.5, 491.8, 513.0, 537.2, 562.3, and 590.7 nm in case of the surface water samples, and were found at 477.2, 493.2, 513.8, 537.0, 562.4, and 590.0 nm in case of the soil water samples.Due to the presence of luminescence quenchers in the natural water samples the measured luminescence lifetimes of the UO2SO4(aq) species of 1.0-2.6 μs were reduced in comparison to pure uranium sulfate solutions, which show a luminescence lifetime of 4.7 μs.These results convincingly show that in the pH range of 3.2-4.0 TRLFS is a suitable and very useful technique to study the uranium speciation in naturally occurring water samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiochemistry, 01328 Dresden, Germany.

ABSTRACT

In situ leaching of uranium ores with sulfuric acid during active uranium mining activity on the Gessenheap has caused longstanding environmental problems of acid mine drainage and elevated concentrations of uranium. To study there remediation measures the test site Gessenwiese, a recultivated former uranium mining heap near Ronnenburg/East Thuringia/Germany, was installed as a part of a research program of the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena to study, among other techniques, the phytoremediation capacity of native and selected plants towards uranium. In the first step the uranium speciation in surface seepage and soil pore waters from Gessenwiese, ranging in pH from 3.2 to 4.0, were studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Both types of water samples showed mono-exponential luminescence decay, indicating the presence of only one major species. The detected emission bands were found at 477.5, 491.8, 513.0, 537.2, 562.3, and 590.7 nm in case of the surface water samples, and were found at 477.2, 493.2, 513.8, 537.0, 562.4, and 590.0 nm in case of the soil water samples. These characteristic peak maxima together with the observed mono-exponential decay indicated that the uranium speciation in the seepage and soil pore waters is dominated by the uranium (VI) sulfate species UO2SO4(aq). Due to the presence of luminescence quenchers in the natural water samples the measured luminescence lifetimes of the UO2SO4(aq) species of 1.0-2.6 μs were reduced in comparison to pure uranium sulfate solutions, which show a luminescence lifetime of 4.7 μs. These results convincingly show that in the pH range of 3.2-4.0 TRLFS is a suitable and very useful technique to study the uranium speciation in naturally occurring water samples.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus