Limits...
HPV Infection and Cervical Screening in Socially Isolated Indigenous Women Inhabitants of the Amazonian Rainforest.

Fonseca AJ, Taeko D, Chaves TA, Amorim LD, Murari RS, Miranda AE, Chen Z, Burk RD, Ferreira LC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Yanomami women >35 y of age were significantly more likely to have HR-HPV, whereas women ≤ 35 y did not significantly differ between groups.Prevalence of HPV was significantly different amongst geographically clustered Yanomami women (p<0.004).Study of HPV in isolated hunter-gather peoples suggests that long-term persistence is a characteristic of prehistoric humans and patterns reflecting decreased prevalence with age in western society represents recent change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Postgraduate Program in Tropical Medicine, Tropical Medicine Foundation Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado, Universidade do Estado do Amazonas, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil; Department of Health Sciences Research, Universidade Federal de Roraima, Boa Vista, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Indigenous women from the Amazon regions have some of the highest rates of cervical cancer in the world. This study evaluated cervical cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) in native women that differ by lifestyle and interaction with western society. Yanomami women are isolated deep in the Amazon with a hunter/gatherer lifestyle. Macuxi and Wapishana women live in proximity to western society.

Methods: To select a representative group of women from each district, random cluster sampling was used, considering each registered village as a cluster. Cervical samples were collected for cytology and HPV detection and typing by PCR amplification and next generation sequencing. The study was approved by the National IRB and by tribal leaders.

Results: 664 native women were enrolled from 13 indigenous villages (76% participation rate). Yanomami women had higher rates of abnormal cytology (5.1% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.04) and prevalent HR-HPV (34.1% vs. 19.2%, p<0.001). Yanomami women >35 y of age were significantly more likely to have HR-HPV, whereas women ≤ 35 y did not significantly differ between groups. Prevalence of HPV was significantly different amongst geographically clustered Yanomami women (p<0.004). The most prevalent HPV types in the entire group were HPV31 (8.7%), HPV16 (5.9%) and HPV18 (4.4%).

Conclusion: Isolated endogenous Yanomami women were more likely to be HPV+ and rates increased with age. Study of HPV in isolated hunter-gather peoples suggests that long-term persistence is a characteristic of prehistoric humans and patterns reflecting decreased prevalence with age in western society represents recent change. These studies have implications for cervical cancer prevention and viral-host relationships.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

HPV prevalence by HPV species groups.*significative difference of prevalence of HPV between ethnic groups (p<0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514624&req=5

pone.0133635.g003: HPV prevalence by HPV species groups.*significative difference of prevalence of HPV between ethnic groups (p<0.05).

Mentions: Sixty different HPV types (representing 12 HPV species groups) were detected (Fig 3). In the Yanomami women, 42 HPV types were detected, compared to 52 types in the Macuxi and Wapishana women (Table 2). In addition, analysis of HPV type diversity using the Shannon-Weiner diversity measure indicated there was greater HPV type diversity amongst the Yanomami women. Eight HPV types had sequence variability higher than 5% in relation to the closest genotype in the amplified fragment, and were considered possible novel HPV types. The majority (n = 7; 87.5%) were from the Eastern group. These samples were sequenced twice using the NGS technique. The most prevalent types in Yanomami women were were HPV 16 (n = 29; 9.5%), HPV 31 (n = 27; 8.8%) and HPV 18 (n = 22; 7.2%). Whereas, HPV 31 (n = 17; 8.6%), HPV 68 (n = 14; 3.8%), HPV 53 (n = 11; 3.0%) were the most common in women from the Eastern District. The prevalence of HR-HPV types was 26.5% (n = 173), and was higher in Yanomami women (34.1% vs 19.2%, p <0.0001). The Yanomami women also had a higher prevalence of HPV16 (9.5% vs 2.8%, p = 0.001) and HPV18 infections (7.2% vs 1.9%, p = 0.003) compared to Macuxi and Wapishana women. There was no difference in the prevalence of HPV (or high-risk HPV) between the ethnic groups for participants below 35 years of age (Fig 4). However, considering women older than 35 years, the Yanomami group had a higher prevalence of HPV infection, HR-HPV, HPV16 and HPV18 in relation to the Eastern group (Table 2).


HPV Infection and Cervical Screening in Socially Isolated Indigenous Women Inhabitants of the Amazonian Rainforest.

Fonseca AJ, Taeko D, Chaves TA, Amorim LD, Murari RS, Miranda AE, Chen Z, Burk RD, Ferreira LC - PLoS ONE (2015)

HPV prevalence by HPV species groups.*significative difference of prevalence of HPV between ethnic groups (p<0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514624&req=5

pone.0133635.g003: HPV prevalence by HPV species groups.*significative difference of prevalence of HPV between ethnic groups (p<0.05).
Mentions: Sixty different HPV types (representing 12 HPV species groups) were detected (Fig 3). In the Yanomami women, 42 HPV types were detected, compared to 52 types in the Macuxi and Wapishana women (Table 2). In addition, analysis of HPV type diversity using the Shannon-Weiner diversity measure indicated there was greater HPV type diversity amongst the Yanomami women. Eight HPV types had sequence variability higher than 5% in relation to the closest genotype in the amplified fragment, and were considered possible novel HPV types. The majority (n = 7; 87.5%) were from the Eastern group. These samples were sequenced twice using the NGS technique. The most prevalent types in Yanomami women were were HPV 16 (n = 29; 9.5%), HPV 31 (n = 27; 8.8%) and HPV 18 (n = 22; 7.2%). Whereas, HPV 31 (n = 17; 8.6%), HPV 68 (n = 14; 3.8%), HPV 53 (n = 11; 3.0%) were the most common in women from the Eastern District. The prevalence of HR-HPV types was 26.5% (n = 173), and was higher in Yanomami women (34.1% vs 19.2%, p <0.0001). The Yanomami women also had a higher prevalence of HPV16 (9.5% vs 2.8%, p = 0.001) and HPV18 infections (7.2% vs 1.9%, p = 0.003) compared to Macuxi and Wapishana women. There was no difference in the prevalence of HPV (or high-risk HPV) between the ethnic groups for participants below 35 years of age (Fig 4). However, considering women older than 35 years, the Yanomami group had a higher prevalence of HPV infection, HR-HPV, HPV16 and HPV18 in relation to the Eastern group (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Yanomami women >35 y of age were significantly more likely to have HR-HPV, whereas women ≤ 35 y did not significantly differ between groups.Prevalence of HPV was significantly different amongst geographically clustered Yanomami women (p<0.004).Study of HPV in isolated hunter-gather peoples suggests that long-term persistence is a characteristic of prehistoric humans and patterns reflecting decreased prevalence with age in western society represents recent change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Postgraduate Program in Tropical Medicine, Tropical Medicine Foundation Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado, Universidade do Estado do Amazonas, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil; Department of Health Sciences Research, Universidade Federal de Roraima, Boa Vista, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Indigenous women from the Amazon regions have some of the highest rates of cervical cancer in the world. This study evaluated cervical cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) in native women that differ by lifestyle and interaction with western society. Yanomami women are isolated deep in the Amazon with a hunter/gatherer lifestyle. Macuxi and Wapishana women live in proximity to western society.

Methods: To select a representative group of women from each district, random cluster sampling was used, considering each registered village as a cluster. Cervical samples were collected for cytology and HPV detection and typing by PCR amplification and next generation sequencing. The study was approved by the National IRB and by tribal leaders.

Results: 664 native women were enrolled from 13 indigenous villages (76% participation rate). Yanomami women had higher rates of abnormal cytology (5.1% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.04) and prevalent HR-HPV (34.1% vs. 19.2%, p<0.001). Yanomami women >35 y of age were significantly more likely to have HR-HPV, whereas women ≤ 35 y did not significantly differ between groups. Prevalence of HPV was significantly different amongst geographically clustered Yanomami women (p<0.004). The most prevalent HPV types in the entire group were HPV31 (8.7%), HPV16 (5.9%) and HPV18 (4.4%).

Conclusion: Isolated endogenous Yanomami women were more likely to be HPV+ and rates increased with age. Study of HPV in isolated hunter-gather peoples suggests that long-term persistence is a characteristic of prehistoric humans and patterns reflecting decreased prevalence with age in western society represents recent change. These studies have implications for cervical cancer prevention and viral-host relationships.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus