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Medical Specialty Choice and Related Factors of Brazilian Medical Students and Recent Doctors.

Correia Lima de Souza L, Mendonça VR, Garcia GB, Brandão EC, Barral-Netto M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: An overall large frequency of participation in extracurricular activities was observed (n = 1,184; 95.8%), which were highly associated with the respective medical area.In primary care, these factors were less important (1.7 ± 1.3 and 1.7 ± 1.5, respectively; median = 2 for both), and higher scores were observed for "curricular internship" (3.2 ± 1.1, median = 4) and "social commitment" (2.6 ± 1.3, median = 3).The present findings provide important insights into developing strategies to stimulate interest in specialties based on the needs of the Brazilian healthcare system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Salvador, Brazil; Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Choosing a medical specialty is an important, complex, and not fully understood process. The present study investigated the factors that are related to choosing and rejecting medical specialties in a group of students and recent medical doctors.

Methodology and findings: A cross-sectional survey of 1,223 medical students and doctors was performed in Brazil in 2012. A standardized literature-based questionnaire was applied that gathered preferable or rejected specialties, and asked questions about extracurricular experiences and the influence of 14 factors on a Likert-type scale from 0 to 4. Specialties were grouped according to lifestyle categories: controllable and uncontrollable, which were subdivided into primary care, internal medicine, and surgical specialties. Notably, the time period of rejection was usually earlier than the time period of intended choice (p < 0.0001, χ(2) = 107.2). The choice mainly occurred during the internship period in medical school (n = 466; 38.7%). An overall large frequency of participation in extracurricular activities was observed (n = 1,184; 95.8%), which were highly associated with the respective medical area. Orthopedic surgery had the highest correlation with participation in specialty-specific organized groups (OR = 59.9, 95% CI = 21.6-166.3) and psychiatry was correlated with participation in research groups (OR = 18.0, 95% CI = 9.0-36.2). With regard to influential factors in controllable lifestyle specialties, "financial reason" (mean score ± standard deviation: 2.8 ± 1.0; median = 3) and "personal time" (3.1 ± 1.3; median = 4) were important factors. In primary care, these factors were less important (1.7 ± 1.3 and 1.7 ± 1.5, respectively; median = 2 for both), and higher scores were observed for "curricular internship" (3.2 ± 1.1, median = 4) and "social commitment" (2.6 ± 1.3, median = 3).

Conclusion: The present findings provide important insights into developing strategies to stimulate interest in specialties based on the needs of the Brazilian healthcare system.

No MeSH data available.


Influential factors of choice (first choice) by groups of medical specialties.The graphic represents the distribution of the mean influence score of six choice factors (selected from 14, according to arithmetic mean difference) in groups of medical specialties. PC, primary care; CL, controllable lifestyle; SS, surgical specialties; IM, internal medicine and subspecialties.
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pone.0133585.g002: Influential factors of choice (first choice) by groups of medical specialties.The graphic represents the distribution of the mean influence score of six choice factors (selected from 14, according to arithmetic mean difference) in groups of medical specialties. PC, primary care; CL, controllable lifestyle; SS, surgical specialties; IM, internal medicine and subspecialties.

Mentions: The gradation of influential factors varied according to the group of specialties (Fig 2, spider graph inputted with mean values) and were classified into two groups: low influence (0 to 2) and high influence (3 to 4). “Autonomy” (mean ± standard deviation: 3.0 ± 1.2; 78.3% with high influence, p < 0.0001), “financial reason” (2.8 ± 1.0; 67.3% with high influence, p < 0.0001), and “personal time” (3.1 ± 1.3; 74.6% with high influence, p < 0.0001) were important factors for choosing controllable lifestyle specialties. The primary care group was largely influenced by “curricular internship” (3.2 ± 1.1; 76.7% with high influence, p < 0.0001) and “social commitment” (2.6 ± 1.3; 59.3% with high influence, p < 0.0001) but less influenced by “financial reason” (1.7 ± 1.3; 68.2% with low influence, p < 0.0001) and “personal time” (1.7 ± 1.5; 66.7% with low influence, p < 0.0001). Surgical specialties had a low influence from “personal time” (1.5 ± 1.4; 77% with low influence, p < 0.0001) and “residency time” (1.0 ± 1.3; 85.9% with low influence, p < 0.0001) but a high influence from “financial reason” (2.7 ± 1.1; 61.9% with high influence, p < 0.0014). Internal medicine had a low influence from “residency time” (1.0 ± 1.2; 87.9% with low influence, p < 0.0001) and a high influence from “social commitment” (2.5 ± 1.2; 54.6% with high influence, p < 0.0001).


Medical Specialty Choice and Related Factors of Brazilian Medical Students and Recent Doctors.

Correia Lima de Souza L, Mendonça VR, Garcia GB, Brandão EC, Barral-Netto M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Influential factors of choice (first choice) by groups of medical specialties.The graphic represents the distribution of the mean influence score of six choice factors (selected from 14, according to arithmetic mean difference) in groups of medical specialties. PC, primary care; CL, controllable lifestyle; SS, surgical specialties; IM, internal medicine and subspecialties.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514603&req=5

pone.0133585.g002: Influential factors of choice (first choice) by groups of medical specialties.The graphic represents the distribution of the mean influence score of six choice factors (selected from 14, according to arithmetic mean difference) in groups of medical specialties. PC, primary care; CL, controllable lifestyle; SS, surgical specialties; IM, internal medicine and subspecialties.
Mentions: The gradation of influential factors varied according to the group of specialties (Fig 2, spider graph inputted with mean values) and were classified into two groups: low influence (0 to 2) and high influence (3 to 4). “Autonomy” (mean ± standard deviation: 3.0 ± 1.2; 78.3% with high influence, p < 0.0001), “financial reason” (2.8 ± 1.0; 67.3% with high influence, p < 0.0001), and “personal time” (3.1 ± 1.3; 74.6% with high influence, p < 0.0001) were important factors for choosing controllable lifestyle specialties. The primary care group was largely influenced by “curricular internship” (3.2 ± 1.1; 76.7% with high influence, p < 0.0001) and “social commitment” (2.6 ± 1.3; 59.3% with high influence, p < 0.0001) but less influenced by “financial reason” (1.7 ± 1.3; 68.2% with low influence, p < 0.0001) and “personal time” (1.7 ± 1.5; 66.7% with low influence, p < 0.0001). Surgical specialties had a low influence from “personal time” (1.5 ± 1.4; 77% with low influence, p < 0.0001) and “residency time” (1.0 ± 1.3; 85.9% with low influence, p < 0.0001) but a high influence from “financial reason” (2.7 ± 1.1; 61.9% with high influence, p < 0.0014). Internal medicine had a low influence from “residency time” (1.0 ± 1.2; 87.9% with low influence, p < 0.0001) and a high influence from “social commitment” (2.5 ± 1.2; 54.6% with high influence, p < 0.0001).

Bottom Line: An overall large frequency of participation in extracurricular activities was observed (n = 1,184; 95.8%), which were highly associated with the respective medical area.In primary care, these factors were less important (1.7 ± 1.3 and 1.7 ± 1.5, respectively; median = 2 for both), and higher scores were observed for "curricular internship" (3.2 ± 1.1, median = 4) and "social commitment" (2.6 ± 1.3, median = 3).The present findings provide important insights into developing strategies to stimulate interest in specialties based on the needs of the Brazilian healthcare system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Salvador, Brazil; Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Choosing a medical specialty is an important, complex, and not fully understood process. The present study investigated the factors that are related to choosing and rejecting medical specialties in a group of students and recent medical doctors.

Methodology and findings: A cross-sectional survey of 1,223 medical students and doctors was performed in Brazil in 2012. A standardized literature-based questionnaire was applied that gathered preferable or rejected specialties, and asked questions about extracurricular experiences and the influence of 14 factors on a Likert-type scale from 0 to 4. Specialties were grouped according to lifestyle categories: controllable and uncontrollable, which were subdivided into primary care, internal medicine, and surgical specialties. Notably, the time period of rejection was usually earlier than the time period of intended choice (p < 0.0001, χ(2) = 107.2). The choice mainly occurred during the internship period in medical school (n = 466; 38.7%). An overall large frequency of participation in extracurricular activities was observed (n = 1,184; 95.8%), which were highly associated with the respective medical area. Orthopedic surgery had the highest correlation with participation in specialty-specific organized groups (OR = 59.9, 95% CI = 21.6-166.3) and psychiatry was correlated with participation in research groups (OR = 18.0, 95% CI = 9.0-36.2). With regard to influential factors in controllable lifestyle specialties, "financial reason" (mean score ± standard deviation: 2.8 ± 1.0; median = 3) and "personal time" (3.1 ± 1.3; median = 4) were important factors. In primary care, these factors were less important (1.7 ± 1.3 and 1.7 ± 1.5, respectively; median = 2 for both), and higher scores were observed for "curricular internship" (3.2 ± 1.1, median = 4) and "social commitment" (2.6 ± 1.3, median = 3).

Conclusion: The present findings provide important insights into developing strategies to stimulate interest in specialties based on the needs of the Brazilian healthcare system.

No MeSH data available.