Limits...
Radiolytic decomposition of pesticide carbendazim in waters and wastes for environmental protection.

Bojanowska-Czajka A, Nichipor H, Drzewicz P, Szostek B, Gałęzowska A, Męczyńska S, Kruszewski M, Zimek Z, Nałęcz-Jawecki G, Trojanowicz M - J Radioanal Nucl Chem (2011)

Bottom Line: The obtained data have been compared with the kinetic modeling.The reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography was used for the determination of carbendazim and its radiolytic decomposition products in irradiated solutions.The changes of toxicity of irradiated solutions were examined with different test organisms and human leukemia cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

The radiolytic degradation of widely used fungicide, carbendazim, in synthetic aqueous solutions and industrial wastewater was investigated employing γ-irradiation. The effect of the absorbed dose, initial concentration and pH of irradiated solution on the effectiveness of carbendazim decomposition were investigated. Decomposition of carbendazim in 100 μM concentration in synthetic aqueous solutions required irradiation with 600 Gy dose. The aqueous solutions of carbendazim have been irradiated in different conditions, where particular active radical species from water radiolysis predominate. The obtained data have been compared with the kinetic modeling. The reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography was used for the determination of carbendazim and its radiolytic decomposition products in irradiated solutions. The changes of toxicity of irradiated solutions were examined with different test organisms and human leukemia cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a Changes of toxicity (24 h test) measured in terms of absorbed dose with Daphtoxkit for 100 μM solutions of carbendazim of pH 7.0 irradiated in aerated solutions with different doses. b The effect of carbendazim on restriction of growth of human leukemia test cells. c Effect of cytostatic activity of 20 μM carbendazim solution of pH 7.0 in terms of applied radiation dose observed for human leukemia test cells
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514462&req=5

Fig3: a Changes of toxicity (24 h test) measured in terms of absorbed dose with Daphtoxkit for 100 μM solutions of carbendazim of pH 7.0 irradiated in aerated solutions with different doses. b The effect of carbendazim on restriction of growth of human leukemia test cells. c Effect of cytostatic activity of 20 μM carbendazim solution of pH 7.0 in terms of applied radiation dose observed for human leukemia test cells

Mentions: Chemical structure of carbendazim containing benzimidazole ring indicates possible toxicity to mentioned already aquatic organisms [35, 36], hence it seems to be more appropriate to employ in this case Daphnia magna test, used already for toxicity studies of carbendazim [37]. Figure 3a shows results of toxicity measurements with Daphtoxkit® obtained in this work for radiolytic decomposition of carbendazim. It was also found that most toxic among examined species is carbendazim. EC50 value for 24 h test for carbendazim was 2.35 μM, while for benzimidazole and 2-hydroxybenzimidazol was above 100 mg L−1, and for 2-aminobenzimidazole 19.3 mg L−1. Irradiation of 100 μM solution of carbendazim with 0.1 kGy dose increases toxicity by four times, while at dose 0.6 kGy where complete decomposition of carbendazim occurs, toxicity in 24 h test is about four times smaller than for the initial solution. The initial increase of toxicity for small doses can be attributed to formation of transient, more toxic, by-products of which identification requires further studies.Fig. 3


Radiolytic decomposition of pesticide carbendazim in waters and wastes for environmental protection.

Bojanowska-Czajka A, Nichipor H, Drzewicz P, Szostek B, Gałęzowska A, Męczyńska S, Kruszewski M, Zimek Z, Nałęcz-Jawecki G, Trojanowicz M - J Radioanal Nucl Chem (2011)

a Changes of toxicity (24 h test) measured in terms of absorbed dose with Daphtoxkit for 100 μM solutions of carbendazim of pH 7.0 irradiated in aerated solutions with different doses. b The effect of carbendazim on restriction of growth of human leukemia test cells. c Effect of cytostatic activity of 20 μM carbendazim solution of pH 7.0 in terms of applied radiation dose observed for human leukemia test cells
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514462&req=5

Fig3: a Changes of toxicity (24 h test) measured in terms of absorbed dose with Daphtoxkit for 100 μM solutions of carbendazim of pH 7.0 irradiated in aerated solutions with different doses. b The effect of carbendazim on restriction of growth of human leukemia test cells. c Effect of cytostatic activity of 20 μM carbendazim solution of pH 7.0 in terms of applied radiation dose observed for human leukemia test cells
Mentions: Chemical structure of carbendazim containing benzimidazole ring indicates possible toxicity to mentioned already aquatic organisms [35, 36], hence it seems to be more appropriate to employ in this case Daphnia magna test, used already for toxicity studies of carbendazim [37]. Figure 3a shows results of toxicity measurements with Daphtoxkit® obtained in this work for radiolytic decomposition of carbendazim. It was also found that most toxic among examined species is carbendazim. EC50 value for 24 h test for carbendazim was 2.35 μM, while for benzimidazole and 2-hydroxybenzimidazol was above 100 mg L−1, and for 2-aminobenzimidazole 19.3 mg L−1. Irradiation of 100 μM solution of carbendazim with 0.1 kGy dose increases toxicity by four times, while at dose 0.6 kGy where complete decomposition of carbendazim occurs, toxicity in 24 h test is about four times smaller than for the initial solution. The initial increase of toxicity for small doses can be attributed to formation of transient, more toxic, by-products of which identification requires further studies.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: The obtained data have been compared with the kinetic modeling.The reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography was used for the determination of carbendazim and its radiolytic decomposition products in irradiated solutions.The changes of toxicity of irradiated solutions were examined with different test organisms and human leukemia cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

The radiolytic degradation of widely used fungicide, carbendazim, in synthetic aqueous solutions and industrial wastewater was investigated employing γ-irradiation. The effect of the absorbed dose, initial concentration and pH of irradiated solution on the effectiveness of carbendazim decomposition were investigated. Decomposition of carbendazim in 100 μM concentration in synthetic aqueous solutions required irradiation with 600 Gy dose. The aqueous solutions of carbendazim have been irradiated in different conditions, where particular active radical species from water radiolysis predominate. The obtained data have been compared with the kinetic modeling. The reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography was used for the determination of carbendazim and its radiolytic decomposition products in irradiated solutions. The changes of toxicity of irradiated solutions were examined with different test organisms and human leukemia cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus