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Effect of the Syrian Civil War on Prevalence of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.

Inci R, Ozturk P, Mulayim MK, Ozyurt K, Alatas ET, Inci MF - Med. Sci. Monit. (2015)

Bottom Line: The majority of the cases were diagnosed between October and December.Immigrations to endemic regions of Turkey from neighbouring countries where CL incidence is higher may lead to large increases in case numbers.In order to decrease the risk of exposure, housing conditions of the refugees must be improved, routine health controls must be performed, effective measures must be set in place for vector control, and infected individuals must be diagnosed and treated to prevent spread of the infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Izmir Katip Celebi University, Atatürk Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a vector-mediated skin disease, characterized by chronic wounds on the skin and caused by macrophages in protozoan parasites. It is an endemic disease in the southern and southeastern Anatolia region and is still an important public health problem in Turkey. Because of the civil war in Syria, immigrants to this region in the last 3 years have begun to more frequently present with this disease. The aim of this study was to draw attention to the dramatic increase in new cases with CL after the beginning of the civil war in Syria.

Material and methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated demographic, epidemiological, and clinical features of 110 patients diagnosed with cutaneous leishmaniasis who were admitted to the Department of Dermatology at Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Faculty of Medicine between January 2011 and June 2014.

Results: A total of 110 patients included in the study; 50 (45%) were males, and 60 (55%) were females. The age range of the study group was 1-78 years, and the infection was more prevalent in the 0-20 year age group. Of these patients, 76 (69%) were Syrian refugees living in tent camps and 34 (31%) were Turkish citizens. The majority of the cases were diagnosed between October and December.

Conclusions: Immigrations to endemic regions of Turkey from neighbouring countries where CL incidence is higher may lead to large increases in case numbers. In order to decrease the risk of exposure, housing conditions of the refugees must be improved, routine health controls must be performed, effective measures must be set in place for vector control, and infected individuals must be diagnosed and treated to prevent spread of the infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Multiple papulonodular lesions in the right cheek of a 11-year-old Syrian boy diagnosed with cutaneous leishmaniasis.
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f1-medscimonit-21-2100: Multiple papulonodular lesions in the right cheek of a 11-year-old Syrian boy diagnosed with cutaneous leishmaniasis.

Mentions: Of 110 patients included in the study, 50 (45%) were males, and 60 (55%) were females, and there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of gender (p>0.05). The age range of the study group was 1–78 years, the infection was more prevalent in the 0–20 year age group (52.7%), and the prevalence rate was significantly higher compared to other age groups (p<0.05) (Table 1). The lesions were located on the face in 79 cases (72%), the hands and arms in 38 cases (35%), feet and legs in 13 cases (12%), and back and abdomen in 4 cases (4%). Of these cases, 77 (70%) had a single lesion and 33 patients (30%) had multiple lesions (Table 1). The number of lesions ranged between 1 and 12, and the mean number of lesions per patient was 2.14. The size of the lesions ranged from 0.5 cm to 8.5 cm, and the mean lesion size was 3.7±2.9 cm. The noduloulcerative lesions were the most common form of lesions, occurring in 59 cases (54%), whereas papulonodular lesion occurring in 47 cases (43%) and vegetative lesions occurring in 4 cases (4%) were less common lesions (Figures 1, 2). The duration of lesions was a minimum of 1 month and a maximum of 19 months as reported by the patients. When the annual distribution of the cases was evaluated, 9 cases occurred in 2011, 11 cases occurred in 2012, 58 cases occurred in 2013, and 32 cases were diagnosed in the first 6 months of 2014 (Table 2). Of these patients, 76 (69%) were Syrian refugees living in the tent camps in Turkish towns after fleeing from the civil war, and 34 (31%) were Turkish citizens living in Kahramanmaraş city center, villages close to the city center, and other districts located close to the Syrian border (Table 2). Cases were diagnosed most frequently between October and December (Figure 3).


Effect of the Syrian Civil War on Prevalence of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.

Inci R, Ozturk P, Mulayim MK, Ozyurt K, Alatas ET, Inci MF - Med. Sci. Monit. (2015)

Multiple papulonodular lesions in the right cheek of a 11-year-old Syrian boy diagnosed with cutaneous leishmaniasis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514268&req=5

f1-medscimonit-21-2100: Multiple papulonodular lesions in the right cheek of a 11-year-old Syrian boy diagnosed with cutaneous leishmaniasis.
Mentions: Of 110 patients included in the study, 50 (45%) were males, and 60 (55%) were females, and there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of gender (p>0.05). The age range of the study group was 1–78 years, the infection was more prevalent in the 0–20 year age group (52.7%), and the prevalence rate was significantly higher compared to other age groups (p<0.05) (Table 1). The lesions were located on the face in 79 cases (72%), the hands and arms in 38 cases (35%), feet and legs in 13 cases (12%), and back and abdomen in 4 cases (4%). Of these cases, 77 (70%) had a single lesion and 33 patients (30%) had multiple lesions (Table 1). The number of lesions ranged between 1 and 12, and the mean number of lesions per patient was 2.14. The size of the lesions ranged from 0.5 cm to 8.5 cm, and the mean lesion size was 3.7±2.9 cm. The noduloulcerative lesions were the most common form of lesions, occurring in 59 cases (54%), whereas papulonodular lesion occurring in 47 cases (43%) and vegetative lesions occurring in 4 cases (4%) were less common lesions (Figures 1, 2). The duration of lesions was a minimum of 1 month and a maximum of 19 months as reported by the patients. When the annual distribution of the cases was evaluated, 9 cases occurred in 2011, 11 cases occurred in 2012, 58 cases occurred in 2013, and 32 cases were diagnosed in the first 6 months of 2014 (Table 2). Of these patients, 76 (69%) were Syrian refugees living in the tent camps in Turkish towns after fleeing from the civil war, and 34 (31%) were Turkish citizens living in Kahramanmaraş city center, villages close to the city center, and other districts located close to the Syrian border (Table 2). Cases were diagnosed most frequently between October and December (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: The majority of the cases were diagnosed between October and December.Immigrations to endemic regions of Turkey from neighbouring countries where CL incidence is higher may lead to large increases in case numbers.In order to decrease the risk of exposure, housing conditions of the refugees must be improved, routine health controls must be performed, effective measures must be set in place for vector control, and infected individuals must be diagnosed and treated to prevent spread of the infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Izmir Katip Celebi University, Atatürk Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a vector-mediated skin disease, characterized by chronic wounds on the skin and caused by macrophages in protozoan parasites. It is an endemic disease in the southern and southeastern Anatolia region and is still an important public health problem in Turkey. Because of the civil war in Syria, immigrants to this region in the last 3 years have begun to more frequently present with this disease. The aim of this study was to draw attention to the dramatic increase in new cases with CL after the beginning of the civil war in Syria.

Material and methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated demographic, epidemiological, and clinical features of 110 patients diagnosed with cutaneous leishmaniasis who were admitted to the Department of Dermatology at Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Faculty of Medicine between January 2011 and June 2014.

Results: A total of 110 patients included in the study; 50 (45%) were males, and 60 (55%) were females. The age range of the study group was 1-78 years, and the infection was more prevalent in the 0-20 year age group. Of these patients, 76 (69%) were Syrian refugees living in tent camps and 34 (31%) were Turkish citizens. The majority of the cases were diagnosed between October and December.

Conclusions: Immigrations to endemic regions of Turkey from neighbouring countries where CL incidence is higher may lead to large increases in case numbers. In order to decrease the risk of exposure, housing conditions of the refugees must be improved, routine health controls must be performed, effective measures must be set in place for vector control, and infected individuals must be diagnosed and treated to prevent spread of the infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus