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Six Weeks Habituation of Simulated Barefoot Running Induces Neuromuscular Adaptations and Changes in Foot Strike Patterns in Female Runners.

Khowailed IA, Petrofsky J, Lohman E, Daher N - Med. Sci. Monit. (2015)

Bottom Line: Six weeks of SBR was associated with a significant decrease in the loading rates and impact forces.Additionally, SBR significantly decrease the stride length, step duration, and flight time, and stride frequency was significantly higher compared to shod running.Non-habituation SBR did not show a significant neuromuscular adaptation in the EMG activity of TA and GAS as manifested after 6 weeks of habituated SBR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health and Human Services, Touro University, Henderson, NV, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 6-week training program of simulated barefoot running (SBR) on running kinetics in habitually shod (wearing shoes) female recreational runners.

Material and methods: Twelve female runners age 25.7 ± 3.4 years gradually increased running distance in Vibram FiveFingers minimal shoes over a 6-week period. The kinetic analysis of treadmill running at 10 Km/h was performed pre- and post-intervention in shod running, non-habituated SBR, and habituated SBR conditions. Spatiotemporal parameters, ground reaction force components, and electromyography (EMG) were measured in all conditions.

Results: Post-intervention data indicated a significant decrease across time in the habituation SBR for EMG activity of the tibialis anterior (TA) in the pre-activation and absorptive phase of running (P<0.001). A significant increase was denoted in the pre-activation amplitude of the gastrocnemius (GAS) between the shod running, unhabituated SBR, and habituated SBR. Six weeks of SBR was associated with a significant decrease in the loading rates and impact forces. Additionally, SBR significantly decrease the stride length, step duration, and flight time, and stride frequency was significantly higher compared to shod running.

Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that changes in motor patterns in previously habitually shod runners are possible and can be accomplished within 6 weeks. Non-habituation SBR did not show a significant neuromuscular adaptation in the EMG activity of TA and GAS as manifested after 6 weeks of habituated SBR.

No MeSH data available.


Integrated EMG of the tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscles during different phases of running during shod running, non-habituated simulated barefoot running (SBR), and habituated simulated barefoot running.
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f3-medscimonit-21-2021: Integrated EMG of the tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscles during different phases of running during shod running, non-habituated simulated barefoot running (SBR), and habituated simulated barefoot running.

Mentions: EMG amplitudes of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius during the pre-activation phase showed a significant difference between foot-striking pattern in both shod running and habituated SBR (Table 3, Figure 3). Amplitudes of the GAS in the pre-activation and stance phases showed significant higher activity in habituated SBR compared to shod condition (60.02±11.32 vs. 18.63±4.70, respectively). No statistical difference was observed concerning the TA muscles for the pre-activation amplitudes between the shod condition and non-habituated SBR. However, a significant difference was detected in the pre-activation amplitude of the GAS between the shod condition and non-habituated SBR. Moreover, concerning the stance and push-off phases, there was no significant statistical difference between the SBR and the SR for both groups of muscles (Table 3, Figure 3).


Six Weeks Habituation of Simulated Barefoot Running Induces Neuromuscular Adaptations and Changes in Foot Strike Patterns in Female Runners.

Khowailed IA, Petrofsky J, Lohman E, Daher N - Med. Sci. Monit. (2015)

Integrated EMG of the tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscles during different phases of running during shod running, non-habituated simulated barefoot running (SBR), and habituated simulated barefoot running.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4514266&req=5

f3-medscimonit-21-2021: Integrated EMG of the tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscles during different phases of running during shod running, non-habituated simulated barefoot running (SBR), and habituated simulated barefoot running.
Mentions: EMG amplitudes of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius during the pre-activation phase showed a significant difference between foot-striking pattern in both shod running and habituated SBR (Table 3, Figure 3). Amplitudes of the GAS in the pre-activation and stance phases showed significant higher activity in habituated SBR compared to shod condition (60.02±11.32 vs. 18.63±4.70, respectively). No statistical difference was observed concerning the TA muscles for the pre-activation amplitudes between the shod condition and non-habituated SBR. However, a significant difference was detected in the pre-activation amplitude of the GAS between the shod condition and non-habituated SBR. Moreover, concerning the stance and push-off phases, there was no significant statistical difference between the SBR and the SR for both groups of muscles (Table 3, Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Six weeks of SBR was associated with a significant decrease in the loading rates and impact forces.Additionally, SBR significantly decrease the stride length, step duration, and flight time, and stride frequency was significantly higher compared to shod running.Non-habituation SBR did not show a significant neuromuscular adaptation in the EMG activity of TA and GAS as manifested after 6 weeks of habituated SBR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health and Human Services, Touro University, Henderson, NV, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 6-week training program of simulated barefoot running (SBR) on running kinetics in habitually shod (wearing shoes) female recreational runners.

Material and methods: Twelve female runners age 25.7 ± 3.4 years gradually increased running distance in Vibram FiveFingers minimal shoes over a 6-week period. The kinetic analysis of treadmill running at 10 Km/h was performed pre- and post-intervention in shod running, non-habituated SBR, and habituated SBR conditions. Spatiotemporal parameters, ground reaction force components, and electromyography (EMG) were measured in all conditions.

Results: Post-intervention data indicated a significant decrease across time in the habituation SBR for EMG activity of the tibialis anterior (TA) in the pre-activation and absorptive phase of running (P<0.001). A significant increase was denoted in the pre-activation amplitude of the gastrocnemius (GAS) between the shod running, unhabituated SBR, and habituated SBR. Six weeks of SBR was associated with a significant decrease in the loading rates and impact forces. Additionally, SBR significantly decrease the stride length, step duration, and flight time, and stride frequency was significantly higher compared to shod running.

Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that changes in motor patterns in previously habitually shod runners are possible and can be accomplished within 6 weeks. Non-habituation SBR did not show a significant neuromuscular adaptation in the EMG activity of TA and GAS as manifested after 6 weeks of habituated SBR.

No MeSH data available.