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Characterizing functional connectivity patterns during saliva swallows in different head positions.

Jestrović I, Coyle JL, Sejdić E - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2015)

Bottom Line: We showed that brain networks for swallowing in both head positions exhibit small-world properties.Furthermore, we showed that swallowing in the chin-tuck head position affects brain networks in the Alpha and Gamma frequency bands.According to these results, we can tell that the parameter of head position should be considered in future investigations which utilize EEG signals during swallowing activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. ivj2@pitt.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The anatomical rationale and efficacy of the chin tuck in improving airway protection for some people with swallowing disorders have been well researched and established. However, there are still open questions regarding whether brain activity for swallowing control is altered while performing this chin-tuck maneuver.

Methods: In this study, we collected EEG signals from 55 healthy adults while swallowing in the neutral and chin-tuck head positions. The time-frequency based synchrony measure was used to form brain networks. We investigated both the small-world properties of these brain networks and differences among the constructed brain networks for the two head positions during swallowing tasks.

Results: We showed that brain networks for swallowing in both head positions exhibit small-world properties. Furthermore, we showed that swallowing in the chin-tuck head position affects brain networks in the Alpha and Gamma frequency bands.

Conclusions: According to these results, we can tell that the parameter of head position should be considered in future investigations which utilize EEG signals during swallowing activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The experimental procedure used in this study
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Fig1: The experimental procedure used in this study

Mentions: In this study, signals were collected from 64 EEG electrodes positioned according to the 10-20 international electrode system [31]. Electrode positioning was accomplished using the actiCAP active electrodes (BrainProducts, Germany), and signal amplification was performed using the actiCHamp amplifier (BrainProducts, Germany). The P1 electrode was chosen as the reference (i.e., EEG voltage potentials are referenced to P1). During all data collections, the electrodes’ impedance was below 15 k Ω. The PyCorder acquisition software provided a 10 kHz sampling frequency, and this software was also used for saving collected data on a computer hard drive. During EEG recording, a dual-axis accelerometer was used to record vibratory correlates of pharyngeal motor activity associated with individual swallows. It also provided temporal evidence regarding the beginning and end of each swallow event which was used to enable segmentation of the EEG signals into swallow-specific data sets. It was positioned on the anterior aspect of the neck at the level of the cricoid cartilage of each participant. The method for determining swallowing segments with the dual-axis accelerometer is described in detail in one of our previous studies [32]. After proper set-up of all EEG equipment was complete, participants were asked to perform ten saliva swallows in their self-selected time base between each swallow, first five saliva swallows in the neutral head position and then five saliva swallows in the chin-tuck head position (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Characterizing functional connectivity patterns during saliva swallows in different head positions.

Jestrović I, Coyle JL, Sejdić E - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2015)

The experimental procedure used in this study
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4513710&req=5

Fig1: The experimental procedure used in this study
Mentions: In this study, signals were collected from 64 EEG electrodes positioned according to the 10-20 international electrode system [31]. Electrode positioning was accomplished using the actiCAP active electrodes (BrainProducts, Germany), and signal amplification was performed using the actiCHamp amplifier (BrainProducts, Germany). The P1 electrode was chosen as the reference (i.e., EEG voltage potentials are referenced to P1). During all data collections, the electrodes’ impedance was below 15 k Ω. The PyCorder acquisition software provided a 10 kHz sampling frequency, and this software was also used for saving collected data on a computer hard drive. During EEG recording, a dual-axis accelerometer was used to record vibratory correlates of pharyngeal motor activity associated with individual swallows. It also provided temporal evidence regarding the beginning and end of each swallow event which was used to enable segmentation of the EEG signals into swallow-specific data sets. It was positioned on the anterior aspect of the neck at the level of the cricoid cartilage of each participant. The method for determining swallowing segments with the dual-axis accelerometer is described in detail in one of our previous studies [32]. After proper set-up of all EEG equipment was complete, participants were asked to perform ten saliva swallows in their self-selected time base between each swallow, first five saliva swallows in the neutral head position and then five saliva swallows in the chin-tuck head position (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We showed that brain networks for swallowing in both head positions exhibit small-world properties.Furthermore, we showed that swallowing in the chin-tuck head position affects brain networks in the Alpha and Gamma frequency bands.According to these results, we can tell that the parameter of head position should be considered in future investigations which utilize EEG signals during swallowing activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. ivj2@pitt.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The anatomical rationale and efficacy of the chin tuck in improving airway protection for some people with swallowing disorders have been well researched and established. However, there are still open questions regarding whether brain activity for swallowing control is altered while performing this chin-tuck maneuver.

Methods: In this study, we collected EEG signals from 55 healthy adults while swallowing in the neutral and chin-tuck head positions. The time-frequency based synchrony measure was used to form brain networks. We investigated both the small-world properties of these brain networks and differences among the constructed brain networks for the two head positions during swallowing tasks.

Results: We showed that brain networks for swallowing in both head positions exhibit small-world properties. Furthermore, we showed that swallowing in the chin-tuck head position affects brain networks in the Alpha and Gamma frequency bands.

Conclusions: According to these results, we can tell that the parameter of head position should be considered in future investigations which utilize EEG signals during swallowing activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus