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Developmental succession of the microbiome of Culex mosquitoes.

Duguma D, Hall MW, Rugman-Jones P, Stouthamer R, Terenius O, Neufeld JD, Walton WE - BMC Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Bacterial communities in early instar C. tarsalis larvae were significantly more diverse when compared to late instar larvae, pupae and newly emerged adults.Some of the bacterial OTUs found in the early instar larvae were also found across developmental stages.Differences in microbiota observed in larval habitats did not influence bacterial community profiles of late instar larvae or adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA. duguma@ufl.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The native microflora associated with mosquitoes have important roles in mosquito development and vector competence. Sequencing of bacterial V3 region from 16S rRNA genes across the developmental stages of Culex mosquitoes (early and late larval instars, pupae and adults) was used to test the hypothesis that bacteria found in the larval stage of Culex are transstadially transmitted to the adult stage, and to compare the microbiomes of field-collected versus laboratory-reared mosquitoes.

Results: Beta diversity analysis revealed that bacterial community structure differed among three life stages (larvae, pupae and adults) of Culex tarsalis. Although only ~2% of the total number of bacterial OTUs were found in all stages, sequences from these OTUs accounted for nearly 82% of the total bacterial sequences recovered from all stages. Thorsellia (Gammaproteobacteria) was the most abundant bacterial taxon found across all developmental stages of field-collected Culex mosquitoes, but was rare in mosquitoes from laboratory-reared colonies. The proportion of Thorsellia sequences in the microbiomes of mosquito life stages varied ontogenetically with the greatest proportions recovered from the pupae of C. tarsalis and the lowest from newly emerged adults. The microbiome of field-collected late instar larvae was not influenced significantly by differences in the microbiota of the habitat due to habitat age or biopesticide treatments. The microbiome diversity was the greatest in the early instar larvae and the lowest in laboratory-reared mosquitoes.

Conclusions: Bacterial communities in early instar C. tarsalis larvae were significantly more diverse when compared to late instar larvae, pupae and newly emerged adults. Some of the bacterial OTUs found in the early instar larvae were also found across developmental stages. Thorsellia dominated the bacterial communities in field-collected immature stages but occurred at much lower relative abundance in adults. Differences in microbiota observed in larval habitats did not influence bacterial community profiles of late instar larvae or adults. However, bacterial communities in laboratory-reared C. tarsalis larvae differed significantly from the field. Determining the role of Thorsellia in mosquitoes and its distribution across different species of mosquitoes warrants further investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Principal coordinate analysis (based on Bray-Curtis distances) of bacterial communities in C. tarsalis. Bacterial communities in early and late instars, pupae, and adults sampled from outdoor mesocosms, and in laboratory-reared late larval instars of C.tarsalis were significantly separated. Pupae and adults were collected only from high Bti treatment and untreated control (see material and methods for details). Late instar larvae were sampled from all treatments
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Fig5: Principal coordinate analysis (based on Bray-Curtis distances) of bacterial communities in C. tarsalis. Bacterial communities in early and late instars, pupae, and adults sampled from outdoor mesocosms, and in laboratory-reared late larval instars of C.tarsalis were significantly separated. Pupae and adults were collected only from high Bti treatment and untreated control (see material and methods for details). Late instar larvae were sampled from all treatments

Mentions: Beta diversity of bacterial communities differed significantly among mosquito developmental stages as assessed by multi-response permutation procedure (MRPP) on the Bray-Curtis and UniFrac distance matrices (Fig.s 5 and 6: MRPP analysis: A: 0.32, p < 0.001 for both). Bacterial diversity in early-instar Culex larvae from the first sampling date separated significantly from that of the late-instar larvae, pupae, and adults. Bacterial communities from lab-reared mosquitoes differed significantly from the bacterial communities in field-collected samples (Fig. 5). Only two samples of pupae and two samples of lab-reared larvae were analyzed in this study. Bacterial communities from one of the two pupal samples grouped tightly with adult samples, whereas the other sample was closely clustered to samples of field-collected late-instar larvae, mainly due to the differences in abundance of Thorsellia (Fig. 6). Bacterial communities from late-instar Culex larvae collected from the field were significantly separated from the other developmental stages (PC 1) and were dominated by Thorsellia and Cyanobacteria.Fig. 5


Developmental succession of the microbiome of Culex mosquitoes.

Duguma D, Hall MW, Rugman-Jones P, Stouthamer R, Terenius O, Neufeld JD, Walton WE - BMC Microbiol. (2015)

Principal coordinate analysis (based on Bray-Curtis distances) of bacterial communities in C. tarsalis. Bacterial communities in early and late instars, pupae, and adults sampled from outdoor mesocosms, and in laboratory-reared late larval instars of C.tarsalis were significantly separated. Pupae and adults were collected only from high Bti treatment and untreated control (see material and methods for details). Late instar larvae were sampled from all treatments
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4513620&req=5

Fig5: Principal coordinate analysis (based on Bray-Curtis distances) of bacterial communities in C. tarsalis. Bacterial communities in early and late instars, pupae, and adults sampled from outdoor mesocosms, and in laboratory-reared late larval instars of C.tarsalis were significantly separated. Pupae and adults were collected only from high Bti treatment and untreated control (see material and methods for details). Late instar larvae were sampled from all treatments
Mentions: Beta diversity of bacterial communities differed significantly among mosquito developmental stages as assessed by multi-response permutation procedure (MRPP) on the Bray-Curtis and UniFrac distance matrices (Fig.s 5 and 6: MRPP analysis: A: 0.32, p < 0.001 for both). Bacterial diversity in early-instar Culex larvae from the first sampling date separated significantly from that of the late-instar larvae, pupae, and adults. Bacterial communities from lab-reared mosquitoes differed significantly from the bacterial communities in field-collected samples (Fig. 5). Only two samples of pupae and two samples of lab-reared larvae were analyzed in this study. Bacterial communities from one of the two pupal samples grouped tightly with adult samples, whereas the other sample was closely clustered to samples of field-collected late-instar larvae, mainly due to the differences in abundance of Thorsellia (Fig. 6). Bacterial communities from late-instar Culex larvae collected from the field were significantly separated from the other developmental stages (PC 1) and were dominated by Thorsellia and Cyanobacteria.Fig. 5

Bottom Line: Bacterial communities in early instar C. tarsalis larvae were significantly more diverse when compared to late instar larvae, pupae and newly emerged adults.Some of the bacterial OTUs found in the early instar larvae were also found across developmental stages.Differences in microbiota observed in larval habitats did not influence bacterial community profiles of late instar larvae or adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA. duguma@ufl.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The native microflora associated with mosquitoes have important roles in mosquito development and vector competence. Sequencing of bacterial V3 region from 16S rRNA genes across the developmental stages of Culex mosquitoes (early and late larval instars, pupae and adults) was used to test the hypothesis that bacteria found in the larval stage of Culex are transstadially transmitted to the adult stage, and to compare the microbiomes of field-collected versus laboratory-reared mosquitoes.

Results: Beta diversity analysis revealed that bacterial community structure differed among three life stages (larvae, pupae and adults) of Culex tarsalis. Although only ~2% of the total number of bacterial OTUs were found in all stages, sequences from these OTUs accounted for nearly 82% of the total bacterial sequences recovered from all stages. Thorsellia (Gammaproteobacteria) was the most abundant bacterial taxon found across all developmental stages of field-collected Culex mosquitoes, but was rare in mosquitoes from laboratory-reared colonies. The proportion of Thorsellia sequences in the microbiomes of mosquito life stages varied ontogenetically with the greatest proportions recovered from the pupae of C. tarsalis and the lowest from newly emerged adults. The microbiome of field-collected late instar larvae was not influenced significantly by differences in the microbiota of the habitat due to habitat age or biopesticide treatments. The microbiome diversity was the greatest in the early instar larvae and the lowest in laboratory-reared mosquitoes.

Conclusions: Bacterial communities in early instar C. tarsalis larvae were significantly more diverse when compared to late instar larvae, pupae and newly emerged adults. Some of the bacterial OTUs found in the early instar larvae were also found across developmental stages. Thorsellia dominated the bacterial communities in field-collected immature stages but occurred at much lower relative abundance in adults. Differences in microbiota observed in larval habitats did not influence bacterial community profiles of late instar larvae or adults. However, bacterial communities in laboratory-reared C. tarsalis larvae differed significantly from the field. Determining the role of Thorsellia in mosquitoes and its distribution across different species of mosquitoes warrants further investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus