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Automatic Evaluation of Speech Rhythm Instability and Acceleration in Dysarthrias Associated with Basal Ganglia Dysfunction.

Rusz J, Hlavnička J, Čmejla R, Růžička E - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2015)

Bottom Line: Although not significant, a tendency for pace acceleration was observed also in the PSP and MSA groups.Our findings underline the crucial role of the basal ganglia in the execution and maintenance of automatic speech motor sequences.We envisage the current approach to become the first step toward the development of acoustic technologies allowing automated assessment of rhythm in dysarthrias.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Circuit Theory, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague , Prague , Czech Republic ; Department of Neurology and Centre of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague , Prague , Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Speech rhythm abnormalities are commonly present in patients with different neurodegenerative disorders. These alterations are hypothesized to be a consequence of disruption to the basal ganglia circuitry involving dysfunction of motor planning, programing, and execution, which can be detected by a syllable repetition paradigm. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to design a robust signal processing technique that allows the automatic detection of spectrally distinctive nuclei of syllable vocalizations and to determine speech features that represent rhythm instability (RI) and rhythm acceleration (RA). A further aim was to elucidate specific patterns of dysrhythmia across various neurodegenerative disorders that share disruption of basal ganglia function. Speech samples based on repetition of the syllable /pa/ at a self-determined steady pace were acquired from 109 subjects, including 22 with Parkinson's disease (PD), 11 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 9 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 24 ephedrone-induced parkinsonism (EP), 20 Huntington's disease (HD), and 23 healthy controls. Subsequently, an algorithm for the automatic detection of syllables as well as features representing RI and RA were designed. The proposed detection algorithm was able to correctly identify syllables and remove erroneous detections due to excessive inspiration and non-speech sounds with a very high accuracy of 99.6%. Instability of vocal pace performance was observed in PSP, MSA, EP, and HD groups. Significantly increased pace acceleration was observed only in the PD group. Although not significant, a tendency for pace acceleration was observed also in the PSP and MSA groups. Our findings underline the crucial role of the basal ganglia in the execution and maintenance of automatic speech motor sequences. We envisage the current approach to become the first step toward the development of acoustic technologies allowing automated assessment of rhythm in dysarthrias.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of acoustic rhythm analyses across individual groups shown in boxplots. Comparison between groups after post hoc Bonferroni adjustment: *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01; ***p < 0.001. The “y” axis for COV and RI features are in the logarithmic scale.
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Figure 6: Results of acoustic rhythm analyses across individual groups shown in boxplots. Comparison between groups after post hoc Bonferroni adjustment: *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01; ***p < 0.001. The “y” axis for COV and RI features are in the logarithmic scale.

Mentions: The results of analyses across all groups and each investigated feature were interpreted using boxplots (Figures 5 and 6). There were no statistically significant differences for PR across investigated groups (, p = 0. 40, η2 = 0. 05) (Figure 5). Statistically significant differences between groups were found for all rhythm metrics including COV5–20 (, p < 0. 001, η2 = 0. 37), PA , p = 0. 02, η2 = 0. 12), RI (, p < 0. 001, η2 = 0. 41), and RA (, p < 0. 001, η2 = 0. 25) (Figure 6). Post hoc comparison for COV5–20 as well as RI indicates that APS and HD groups showed significantly higher instability of syllable repetition than HC and PD groups. In addition, post hoc comparison of RA demonstrated that the PD group tended to significantly accelerate rhythm in comparison to the HC, EP, and HD groups. Although not significant, a similar trend toward acceleration of rhythm was also observed in PSP and MSA; when comparing the performance of individual speakers to the 5–95th percentile based on the HC group, pace acceleration (RA >0.45) was observed in 11 PD (50%), 4 MSA (44%), and 5 PSP (45%) patients, and only in 2 EP (8%), 1 HD (5%), and 1 HC (4%) speakers.


Automatic Evaluation of Speech Rhythm Instability and Acceleration in Dysarthrias Associated with Basal Ganglia Dysfunction.

Rusz J, Hlavnička J, Čmejla R, Růžička E - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2015)

Results of acoustic rhythm analyses across individual groups shown in boxplots. Comparison between groups after post hoc Bonferroni adjustment: *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01; ***p < 0.001. The “y” axis for COV and RI features are in the logarithmic scale.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4513571&req=5

Figure 6: Results of acoustic rhythm analyses across individual groups shown in boxplots. Comparison between groups after post hoc Bonferroni adjustment: *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01; ***p < 0.001. The “y” axis for COV and RI features are in the logarithmic scale.
Mentions: The results of analyses across all groups and each investigated feature were interpreted using boxplots (Figures 5 and 6). There were no statistically significant differences for PR across investigated groups (, p = 0. 40, η2 = 0. 05) (Figure 5). Statistically significant differences between groups were found for all rhythm metrics including COV5–20 (, p < 0. 001, η2 = 0. 37), PA , p = 0. 02, η2 = 0. 12), RI (, p < 0. 001, η2 = 0. 41), and RA (, p < 0. 001, η2 = 0. 25) (Figure 6). Post hoc comparison for COV5–20 as well as RI indicates that APS and HD groups showed significantly higher instability of syllable repetition than HC and PD groups. In addition, post hoc comparison of RA demonstrated that the PD group tended to significantly accelerate rhythm in comparison to the HC, EP, and HD groups. Although not significant, a similar trend toward acceleration of rhythm was also observed in PSP and MSA; when comparing the performance of individual speakers to the 5–95th percentile based on the HC group, pace acceleration (RA >0.45) was observed in 11 PD (50%), 4 MSA (44%), and 5 PSP (45%) patients, and only in 2 EP (8%), 1 HD (5%), and 1 HC (4%) speakers.

Bottom Line: Although not significant, a tendency for pace acceleration was observed also in the PSP and MSA groups.Our findings underline the crucial role of the basal ganglia in the execution and maintenance of automatic speech motor sequences.We envisage the current approach to become the first step toward the development of acoustic technologies allowing automated assessment of rhythm in dysarthrias.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Circuit Theory, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague , Prague , Czech Republic ; Department of Neurology and Centre of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague , Prague , Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Speech rhythm abnormalities are commonly present in patients with different neurodegenerative disorders. These alterations are hypothesized to be a consequence of disruption to the basal ganglia circuitry involving dysfunction of motor planning, programing, and execution, which can be detected by a syllable repetition paradigm. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to design a robust signal processing technique that allows the automatic detection of spectrally distinctive nuclei of syllable vocalizations and to determine speech features that represent rhythm instability (RI) and rhythm acceleration (RA). A further aim was to elucidate specific patterns of dysrhythmia across various neurodegenerative disorders that share disruption of basal ganglia function. Speech samples based on repetition of the syllable /pa/ at a self-determined steady pace were acquired from 109 subjects, including 22 with Parkinson's disease (PD), 11 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 9 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 24 ephedrone-induced parkinsonism (EP), 20 Huntington's disease (HD), and 23 healthy controls. Subsequently, an algorithm for the automatic detection of syllables as well as features representing RI and RA were designed. The proposed detection algorithm was able to correctly identify syllables and remove erroneous detections due to excessive inspiration and non-speech sounds with a very high accuracy of 99.6%. Instability of vocal pace performance was observed in PSP, MSA, EP, and HD groups. Significantly increased pace acceleration was observed only in the PD group. Although not significant, a tendency for pace acceleration was observed also in the PSP and MSA groups. Our findings underline the crucial role of the basal ganglia in the execution and maintenance of automatic speech motor sequences. We envisage the current approach to become the first step toward the development of acoustic technologies allowing automated assessment of rhythm in dysarthrias.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus