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"Test me and treat me"--attitudes to vitamin D deficiency and supplementation: a qualitative study.

Kotta S, Gadhvi D, Jakeways N, Saeed M, Sohanpal R, Hull S, Famakin O, Martineau A, Griffiths C - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Medicalised views of vitamin D were prominent, notably from those in favour of supplementation, who talked of "doses", "side effects" and "regular testing." Fortification of food with vitamin D was controversial, with opposing utilitarian (better overall for the majority) and libertarian (freedom to choose) views.Knowledge about vitamin D was limited.Health policy should address the public's need for clear information on sources and effects of vitamin D, including risks and benefits of sun exposure, and take account of divergent views on fortification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research, Blizard Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Numbers of patients prescribed vitamin D by general practices in the east London boroughs of Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham, and all three boroughs together (‘East London and the City’).
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BMJOPEN2014007401F1: Numbers of patients prescribed vitamin D by general practices in the east London boroughs of Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham, and all three boroughs together (‘East London and the City’).

Mentions: The last decade has seen an explosion of public interest in vitamin D. Use of vitamin D as a Google search term increased fivefold over the last decade.1 Vitamin D supplements and fortified foods are widely marketed as benefiting health. Widespread testing of vitamin D status and prescribing by health professionals has further fuelled public interest.2 One east London hospital laboratory processed a 10-fold increase in vitamin D test requests (largely from primary care) over a 5-year period from 2006 to 2010, reaching 44 500 per annum (personal communication, Timms P. Vitamin D testing at Homerton Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, 2014). Prescribing of vitamin D preparations has risen dramatically, with eight in every 100 east London patients receiving vitamin D (figure 1).3 In one east London borough (Tower Hamlets), numbers of patients prescribed vitamin D outstripped that for statins, aspirin, and proton pump inhibitors.3


"Test me and treat me"--attitudes to vitamin D deficiency and supplementation: a qualitative study.

Kotta S, Gadhvi D, Jakeways N, Saeed M, Sohanpal R, Hull S, Famakin O, Martineau A, Griffiths C - BMJ Open (2015)

Numbers of patients prescribed vitamin D by general practices in the east London boroughs of Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham, and all three boroughs together (‘East London and the City’).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4513450&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007401F1: Numbers of patients prescribed vitamin D by general practices in the east London boroughs of Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham, and all three boroughs together (‘East London and the City’).
Mentions: The last decade has seen an explosion of public interest in vitamin D. Use of vitamin D as a Google search term increased fivefold over the last decade.1 Vitamin D supplements and fortified foods are widely marketed as benefiting health. Widespread testing of vitamin D status and prescribing by health professionals has further fuelled public interest.2 One east London hospital laboratory processed a 10-fold increase in vitamin D test requests (largely from primary care) over a 5-year period from 2006 to 2010, reaching 44 500 per annum (personal communication, Timms P. Vitamin D testing at Homerton Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, 2014). Prescribing of vitamin D preparations has risen dramatically, with eight in every 100 east London patients receiving vitamin D (figure 1).3 In one east London borough (Tower Hamlets), numbers of patients prescribed vitamin D outstripped that for statins, aspirin, and proton pump inhibitors.3

Bottom Line: Medicalised views of vitamin D were prominent, notably from those in favour of supplementation, who talked of "doses", "side effects" and "regular testing." Fortification of food with vitamin D was controversial, with opposing utilitarian (better overall for the majority) and libertarian (freedom to choose) views.Knowledge about vitamin D was limited.Health policy should address the public's need for clear information on sources and effects of vitamin D, including risks and benefits of sun exposure, and take account of divergent views on fortification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research, Blizard Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus