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Thresholds of skin sensitivity are partially influenced by mechanical properties of the skin on the foot sole.

Strzalkowski ND, Triano JJ, Lam CK, Templeton CA, Bent LR - Physiol Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Following this hypothesis, the MedArch was consistently found to be the thinnest and softest site and demonstrated the greatest sensitivity.Conversely, the Heel was found to be the thickest and hardest site, and was relatively insensitive across perceptual tests.When normalized (% greater or smaller than subject mean) to the subject mean for each variable, significant positive correlations were observed between MF and skin hardness (R(2) = 0.422, P < 0.0001) and epidermal thickness (R(2) = 0.433, P < 0.0001) providing evidence that skin mechanics can influence MF threshold.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean vibration and monofilament perception thresholds across the foot sole with standard error. No significant differences were found across site at 3 Hz (A) or 40 Hz (B) VPT. Significant differences were found at 250 Hz VPT (C) and MF (D). # indicates a significantly higher threshold of the GT compared to all other sites and * denotes a significant difference (P < 0.05).
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fig03: Mean vibration and monofilament perception thresholds across the foot sole with standard error. No significant differences were found across site at 3 Hz (A) or 40 Hz (B) VPT. Significant differences were found at 250 Hz VPT (C) and MF (D). # indicates a significantly higher threshold of the GT compared to all other sites and * denotes a significant difference (P < 0.05).

Mentions: Vibration perception threshold significantly decreased (sensitivity increased) with increasing test frequency (P < 0.0001). Hence, the ability to detect a vibration was significantly greater at 250 Hz (2.90 μm) than at 40 Hz (15.54 μm) and greater at 40 Hz compared to 3 Hz (218.51 μm), across all foot sole sites. A significant main effect of site was found for VPT, but only for vibration at the 250 Hz frequency (P < 0.0001) (Fig.3). Significant site differences were also found for MF testing (see below). Post-hoc analyses indicated that the GT had the highest vibration threshold at 250 Hz (4.98 μm); significantly higher than all other sites across the foot sole (P < 0.0001), while the heel was the second least sensitive at 250 Hz with a threshold of 2.81 μm. The MedArch had significantly lower vibration threshold at 250 Hz (1.96 μm) compared to all sites (P < 0.05) except for the LatArch (P = 0.068). At 250 Hz, the MedArch was found to be the most sensitive site in 58% of subjects, while the GT and Heel were never the most sensitive. Neither of the lower frequencies, 3 Hz or 40 Hz, demonstrated significant site differences for VPT.


Thresholds of skin sensitivity are partially influenced by mechanical properties of the skin on the foot sole.

Strzalkowski ND, Triano JJ, Lam CK, Templeton CA, Bent LR - Physiol Rep (2015)

Mean vibration and monofilament perception thresholds across the foot sole with standard error. No significant differences were found across site at 3 Hz (A) or 40 Hz (B) VPT. Significant differences were found at 250 Hz VPT (C) and MF (D). # indicates a significantly higher threshold of the GT compared to all other sites and * denotes a significant difference (P < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4510627&req=5

fig03: Mean vibration and monofilament perception thresholds across the foot sole with standard error. No significant differences were found across site at 3 Hz (A) or 40 Hz (B) VPT. Significant differences were found at 250 Hz VPT (C) and MF (D). # indicates a significantly higher threshold of the GT compared to all other sites and * denotes a significant difference (P < 0.05).
Mentions: Vibration perception threshold significantly decreased (sensitivity increased) with increasing test frequency (P < 0.0001). Hence, the ability to detect a vibration was significantly greater at 250 Hz (2.90 μm) than at 40 Hz (15.54 μm) and greater at 40 Hz compared to 3 Hz (218.51 μm), across all foot sole sites. A significant main effect of site was found for VPT, but only for vibration at the 250 Hz frequency (P < 0.0001) (Fig.3). Significant site differences were also found for MF testing (see below). Post-hoc analyses indicated that the GT had the highest vibration threshold at 250 Hz (4.98 μm); significantly higher than all other sites across the foot sole (P < 0.0001), while the heel was the second least sensitive at 250 Hz with a threshold of 2.81 μm. The MedArch had significantly lower vibration threshold at 250 Hz (1.96 μm) compared to all sites (P < 0.05) except for the LatArch (P = 0.068). At 250 Hz, the MedArch was found to be the most sensitive site in 58% of subjects, while the GT and Heel were never the most sensitive. Neither of the lower frequencies, 3 Hz or 40 Hz, demonstrated significant site differences for VPT.

Bottom Line: Following this hypothesis, the MedArch was consistently found to be the thinnest and softest site and demonstrated the greatest sensitivity.Conversely, the Heel was found to be the thickest and hardest site, and was relatively insensitive across perceptual tests.When normalized (% greater or smaller than subject mean) to the subject mean for each variable, significant positive correlations were observed between MF and skin hardness (R(2) = 0.422, P < 0.0001) and epidermal thickness (R(2) = 0.433, P < 0.0001) providing evidence that skin mechanics can influence MF threshold.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus