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Habitat Heterogeneity Affects Plant and Arthropod Species Diversity and Turnover in Traditional Cornfields.

Martínez E, Rös M, Bonilla MA, Dirzo R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: To understand the factors that influence patterns of diversity in human-dominated landscapes, we investigate the effect of land use types on plant and arthropod diversity in traditionally managed cornfields, via surveys of plants and arthropods in twelve traditional cornfields in the Colombian Andes.The dominant plant species varied among fields, resulting in high differentiation of plant communities.Predator communities also exhibited high turnover among cornfields, but differences in composition arose mainly among rare species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Escuela de Posgrados, Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia.

ABSTRACT
The expansion of the agricultural frontier by the clearing of remnant forests has led to human-dominated landscape mosaics. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of these landscape mosaics on arthropod diversity at local spatial scales in temperate and tropical regions, but little is known about fragmentation effects in crop systems, such as the complex tropical traditional crop systems that maintain a high diversity of weeds and arthropods in low-Andean regions. To understand the factors that influence patterns of diversity in human-dominated landscapes, we investigate the effect of land use types on plant and arthropod diversity in traditionally managed cornfields, via surveys of plants and arthropods in twelve traditional cornfields in the Colombian Andes. We estimated alpha and beta diversity to analyze changes in diversity related to land uses within a radius of 100 m to 1 km around each cornfield. We observed that forests influenced alpha diversity of plants, but not of arthropods. Agricultural lands had a positive relationship with plants and herbivores, but a negative relationship with predators. Pastures positively influenced the diversity of plants and arthropods. In addition, forest cover seemed to influence changes in plant species composition and species turnover of herbivore communities among cornfields. The dominant plant species varied among fields, resulting in high differentiation of plant communities. Predator communities also exhibited high turnover among cornfields, but differences in composition arose mainly among rare species. The crop system evaluated in this study represents a widespread situation in the tropics, therefore, our results can be of broad significance. Our findings suggest that traditional agriculture may not homogenize biological communities, but instead could maintain the regional pool of species through high beta diversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Beta diversity profiles of plants, arthropods and predators collected in twelve traditional cornfields.The plot indicates that differences in species composition among cornfields were stronger among abundant plant species, whereas for arthropods these differences arose among rare species, particularly for predators.
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pone.0128950.g002: Beta diversity profiles of plants, arthropods and predators collected in twelve traditional cornfields.The plot indicates that differences in species composition among cornfields were stronger among abundant plant species, whereas for arthropods these differences arose among rare species, particularly for predators.

Mentions: Beta diversity profiles indicated that the turnover of species among cornfields differed for plants and arthropods. Plant beta diversity increased as the order of diversity (q) increased, whereas arthropod beta diversity decreased (Fig 2). Consequently, the highest differences in species composition among cornfields were stronger among abundant plant species, whereas for arthropods these differences arose among rare species, and particularly among predators.


Habitat Heterogeneity Affects Plant and Arthropod Species Diversity and Turnover in Traditional Cornfields.

Martínez E, Rös M, Bonilla MA, Dirzo R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Beta diversity profiles of plants, arthropods and predators collected in twelve traditional cornfields.The plot indicates that differences in species composition among cornfields were stronger among abundant plant species, whereas for arthropods these differences arose among rare species, particularly for predators.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4510542&req=5

pone.0128950.g002: Beta diversity profiles of plants, arthropods and predators collected in twelve traditional cornfields.The plot indicates that differences in species composition among cornfields were stronger among abundant plant species, whereas for arthropods these differences arose among rare species, particularly for predators.
Mentions: Beta diversity profiles indicated that the turnover of species among cornfields differed for plants and arthropods. Plant beta diversity increased as the order of diversity (q) increased, whereas arthropod beta diversity decreased (Fig 2). Consequently, the highest differences in species composition among cornfields were stronger among abundant plant species, whereas for arthropods these differences arose among rare species, and particularly among predators.

Bottom Line: To understand the factors that influence patterns of diversity in human-dominated landscapes, we investigate the effect of land use types on plant and arthropod diversity in traditionally managed cornfields, via surveys of plants and arthropods in twelve traditional cornfields in the Colombian Andes.The dominant plant species varied among fields, resulting in high differentiation of plant communities.Predator communities also exhibited high turnover among cornfields, but differences in composition arose mainly among rare species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Escuela de Posgrados, Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia.

ABSTRACT
The expansion of the agricultural frontier by the clearing of remnant forests has led to human-dominated landscape mosaics. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of these landscape mosaics on arthropod diversity at local spatial scales in temperate and tropical regions, but little is known about fragmentation effects in crop systems, such as the complex tropical traditional crop systems that maintain a high diversity of weeds and arthropods in low-Andean regions. To understand the factors that influence patterns of diversity in human-dominated landscapes, we investigate the effect of land use types on plant and arthropod diversity in traditionally managed cornfields, via surveys of plants and arthropods in twelve traditional cornfields in the Colombian Andes. We estimated alpha and beta diversity to analyze changes in diversity related to land uses within a radius of 100 m to 1 km around each cornfield. We observed that forests influenced alpha diversity of plants, but not of arthropods. Agricultural lands had a positive relationship with plants and herbivores, but a negative relationship with predators. Pastures positively influenced the diversity of plants and arthropods. In addition, forest cover seemed to influence changes in plant species composition and species turnover of herbivore communities among cornfields. The dominant plant species varied among fields, resulting in high differentiation of plant communities. Predator communities also exhibited high turnover among cornfields, but differences in composition arose mainly among rare species. The crop system evaluated in this study represents a widespread situation in the tropics, therefore, our results can be of broad significance. Our findings suggest that traditional agriculture may not homogenize biological communities, but instead could maintain the regional pool of species through high beta diversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus