Limits...
Application of the consolidated species concept to Cercospora spp. from Iran.

Bakhshi M, Arzanlou M, Babai-Ahari A, Groenewald JZ, Braun U, Crous PW - Persoonia (2014)

Bottom Line: However, most of the cercosporoid species found to date have been identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and there are no cultures that support these identifications.Our results revealed a rich diversity of Cercospora species in northern Iran.G and C. zebrina.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plant Protection Department, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Tabriz, P.O. Box 5166614766, Tabriz, Iran;

ABSTRACT
The genus Cercospora includes many important plant pathogenic fungi associated with leaf spot diseases on a wide range of hosts. The mainland of Iran covers various climatic regions with a great biodiversity of vascular plants, and a correspondingly high diversity of cercosporoid fungi. However, most of the cercosporoid species found to date have been identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and there are no cultures that support these identifications. In this study the Consolidated Species Concept was applied to differentiate Cercospora species collected from Iran. A total of 161 Cercospora isolates recovered from 74 host species in northern Iran were studied by molecular phylogenetic analysis. Our results revealed a rich diversity of Cercospora species in northern Iran. Twenty species were identified based on sequence data of five genomic loci (ITS, TEF1-α, actin, calmodulin and histone H3), host, cultural and morphological data. Six novel species, viz. C. convolvulicola, C. conyzae-canadensis, C. cylindracea, C. iranica, C. pseudochenopodii and C. sorghicola, are introduced. The most common taxon was Cercospora cf. flagellaris, which remains an unresolved species complex with a wide host range. New hosts were recorded for previously known Cercospora species, including C. apii, C. armoraciae, C. beticola, C. cf. richardiicola, C. rumicis, Cercospora sp. G and C. zebrina.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Consensus phylogram (50 % majority rule) of 43 082 trees resulting from a Bayesian analysis of the combined 5-gene sequence alignment using MrBayes v. 3.2.1. Bayesian posterior probabilities are indicated with colour-coded branches and numbers (see legend) and the scale bar indicates 0.2 expected changes per site. Lineages from Iran are indicated in coloured blocks and species names in black text. Hosts and provinces of origin are indicated in green and brown text, respectively. The tree was rooted to Ramularia endophylla (isolate CBS 113265).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4510272&req=5

Figure 1: Consensus phylogram (50 % majority rule) of 43 082 trees resulting from a Bayesian analysis of the combined 5-gene sequence alignment using MrBayes v. 3.2.1. Bayesian posterior probabilities are indicated with colour-coded branches and numbers (see legend) and the scale bar indicates 0.2 expected changes per site. Lineages from Iran are indicated in coloured blocks and species names in black text. Hosts and provinces of origin are indicated in green and brown text, respectively. The tree was rooted to Ramularia endophylla (isolate CBS 113265).

Mentions: The Consolidated Species Concept was employed in this study to distinguish species, revealing a rich diversity among the Cercospora species studied. Twenty lineages of Cercospora from Iran were resolved based on the clustering and support in the Bayesian tree obtained from the combined ITS, TEF1-α, ACT, CAL and HIS alignment (Fig. 1). Data are alphabetically summarised in Table 1. Eight species including C. althaeina, C. apii (species complex), C. armoraciae (species complex), C. beticola, C. chenopodii, C. rumicis, C. violae and C. zebrina were assigned to existing species names. Three more species including C. cf. flagellaris (species complex), C. cf. richardiicola and C. cf. zinniae were morphologically similar to existing species, but as explained by Groenewald et al. (2013), these names could not be applied in cases where the ex-type strain was unavailable. In these cases, species were indicated with ‘cf.’ in the species name.


Application of the consolidated species concept to Cercospora spp. from Iran.

Bakhshi M, Arzanlou M, Babai-Ahari A, Groenewald JZ, Braun U, Crous PW - Persoonia (2014)

Consensus phylogram (50 % majority rule) of 43 082 trees resulting from a Bayesian analysis of the combined 5-gene sequence alignment using MrBayes v. 3.2.1. Bayesian posterior probabilities are indicated with colour-coded branches and numbers (see legend) and the scale bar indicates 0.2 expected changes per site. Lineages from Iran are indicated in coloured blocks and species names in black text. Hosts and provinces of origin are indicated in green and brown text, respectively. The tree was rooted to Ramularia endophylla (isolate CBS 113265).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4510272&req=5

Figure 1: Consensus phylogram (50 % majority rule) of 43 082 trees resulting from a Bayesian analysis of the combined 5-gene sequence alignment using MrBayes v. 3.2.1. Bayesian posterior probabilities are indicated with colour-coded branches and numbers (see legend) and the scale bar indicates 0.2 expected changes per site. Lineages from Iran are indicated in coloured blocks and species names in black text. Hosts and provinces of origin are indicated in green and brown text, respectively. The tree was rooted to Ramularia endophylla (isolate CBS 113265).
Mentions: The Consolidated Species Concept was employed in this study to distinguish species, revealing a rich diversity among the Cercospora species studied. Twenty lineages of Cercospora from Iran were resolved based on the clustering and support in the Bayesian tree obtained from the combined ITS, TEF1-α, ACT, CAL and HIS alignment (Fig. 1). Data are alphabetically summarised in Table 1. Eight species including C. althaeina, C. apii (species complex), C. armoraciae (species complex), C. beticola, C. chenopodii, C. rumicis, C. violae and C. zebrina were assigned to existing species names. Three more species including C. cf. flagellaris (species complex), C. cf. richardiicola and C. cf. zinniae were morphologically similar to existing species, but as explained by Groenewald et al. (2013), these names could not be applied in cases where the ex-type strain was unavailable. In these cases, species were indicated with ‘cf.’ in the species name.

Bottom Line: However, most of the cercosporoid species found to date have been identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and there are no cultures that support these identifications.Our results revealed a rich diversity of Cercospora species in northern Iran.G and C. zebrina.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plant Protection Department, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Tabriz, P.O. Box 5166614766, Tabriz, Iran;

ABSTRACT
The genus Cercospora includes many important plant pathogenic fungi associated with leaf spot diseases on a wide range of hosts. The mainland of Iran covers various climatic regions with a great biodiversity of vascular plants, and a correspondingly high diversity of cercosporoid fungi. However, most of the cercosporoid species found to date have been identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and there are no cultures that support these identifications. In this study the Consolidated Species Concept was applied to differentiate Cercospora species collected from Iran. A total of 161 Cercospora isolates recovered from 74 host species in northern Iran were studied by molecular phylogenetic analysis. Our results revealed a rich diversity of Cercospora species in northern Iran. Twenty species were identified based on sequence data of five genomic loci (ITS, TEF1-α, actin, calmodulin and histone H3), host, cultural and morphological data. Six novel species, viz. C. convolvulicola, C. conyzae-canadensis, C. cylindracea, C. iranica, C. pseudochenopodii and C. sorghicola, are introduced. The most common taxon was Cercospora cf. flagellaris, which remains an unresolved species complex with a wide host range. New hosts were recorded for previously known Cercospora species, including C. apii, C. armoraciae, C. beticola, C. cf. richardiicola, C. rumicis, Cercospora sp. G and C. zebrina.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus