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A simple and robust method for pre-wetting poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres.

Wright B, Parmar N, Bozec L, Aguayo SD, Day RM - J Biomater Appl (2015)

Bottom Line: Pre-wetting (over 3 h) with 70% (v/v) ethanol allowed significantly greater (p ≤ 0.01) serum protein adsorption to microspheres than wetting with 35% (v/v) ethanol.On serum protein-loaded microspheres, greater numbers of myoblasts attached to constructs wetted with 70% ethanol than those partially wetted with 35% (v/v) ethanol.We conclude that our novel protocol for pre-wetting poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres that incorporates biochemical and structural features into this biomaterial can facilitate myoblast delivery for use in clinical settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Applied Biomedical Engineering Group, Division of Medicine, University College London.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Wetting and hydrophilisation of hydrophobic polymers. Wetting (a) is a simple procedure that is achieved with diluted ethanol. The ethanol is exchanged for culture medium until pore spaces in the polymer are filled with medium, allowing the polymer to become submerged. Hydrophilisation (b) involves hydrolysis of a polymer by a strong alkali (e.g. NaOH) or acid (e.g. chloric acid solution) to create hydroxyl or carboxyl groups on the polymer surface.
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fig1-0885328215577297: Wetting and hydrophilisation of hydrophobic polymers. Wetting (a) is a simple procedure that is achieved with diluted ethanol. The ethanol is exchanged for culture medium until pore spaces in the polymer are filled with medium, allowing the polymer to become submerged. Hydrophilisation (b) involves hydrolysis of a polymer by a strong alkali (e.g. NaOH) or acid (e.g. chloric acid solution) to create hydroxyl or carboxyl groups on the polymer surface.

Mentions: Poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) is a synthetic, biocompatible copolymer that is commonly used as a cell1 and protein2 delivery scaffold. Due to intrinsic hydrophobic properties, PLGA polymers require pre-treatment to wet or hydrophilise their surface and thereby allow cell attachment. A number of approaches including ethanol immersion,3,4 chemical modification with alkaline solutions (e.g. NaOH)5 and plasma oxygen6,7 are demonstrated as viable techniques for improving the hydrophilicity, pre-wetting or hydrophilisation of PLGA. The ethanol-mediated pre-wetting method involves the exchange of ethanol for culture medium in microsphere pores to eventually submerge these constructs and enable contact with cells, whereas hydrophilisation involves hydrolysis of the microsphere surface with strong acids or alkalis (Figure 1). For laboratory and clinical application of PLGA microspheres, the simple, practical, ethanol immersion method for pre-wetting PLGA is the best approach. The aim of the current study is to describe optimal conditions for ethanol-dependent wetting of PLGA microspheres that support efficient loading of human skeletal myoblasts.Figure 1.


A simple and robust method for pre-wetting poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres.

Wright B, Parmar N, Bozec L, Aguayo SD, Day RM - J Biomater Appl (2015)

Wetting and hydrophilisation of hydrophobic polymers. Wetting (a) is a simple procedure that is achieved with diluted ethanol. The ethanol is exchanged for culture medium until pore spaces in the polymer are filled with medium, allowing the polymer to become submerged. Hydrophilisation (b) involves hydrolysis of a polymer by a strong alkali (e.g. NaOH) or acid (e.g. chloric acid solution) to create hydroxyl or carboxyl groups on the polymer surface.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4509882&req=5

fig1-0885328215577297: Wetting and hydrophilisation of hydrophobic polymers. Wetting (a) is a simple procedure that is achieved with diluted ethanol. The ethanol is exchanged for culture medium until pore spaces in the polymer are filled with medium, allowing the polymer to become submerged. Hydrophilisation (b) involves hydrolysis of a polymer by a strong alkali (e.g. NaOH) or acid (e.g. chloric acid solution) to create hydroxyl or carboxyl groups on the polymer surface.
Mentions: Poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) is a synthetic, biocompatible copolymer that is commonly used as a cell1 and protein2 delivery scaffold. Due to intrinsic hydrophobic properties, PLGA polymers require pre-treatment to wet or hydrophilise their surface and thereby allow cell attachment. A number of approaches including ethanol immersion,3,4 chemical modification with alkaline solutions (e.g. NaOH)5 and plasma oxygen6,7 are demonstrated as viable techniques for improving the hydrophilicity, pre-wetting or hydrophilisation of PLGA. The ethanol-mediated pre-wetting method involves the exchange of ethanol for culture medium in microsphere pores to eventually submerge these constructs and enable contact with cells, whereas hydrophilisation involves hydrolysis of the microsphere surface with strong acids or alkalis (Figure 1). For laboratory and clinical application of PLGA microspheres, the simple, practical, ethanol immersion method for pre-wetting PLGA is the best approach. The aim of the current study is to describe optimal conditions for ethanol-dependent wetting of PLGA microspheres that support efficient loading of human skeletal myoblasts.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Pre-wetting (over 3 h) with 70% (v/v) ethanol allowed significantly greater (p ≤ 0.01) serum protein adsorption to microspheres than wetting with 35% (v/v) ethanol.On serum protein-loaded microspheres, greater numbers of myoblasts attached to constructs wetted with 70% ethanol than those partially wetted with 35% (v/v) ethanol.We conclude that our novel protocol for pre-wetting poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres that incorporates biochemical and structural features into this biomaterial can facilitate myoblast delivery for use in clinical settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Applied Biomedical Engineering Group, Division of Medicine, University College London.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus