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The Effect of Smear Layer on Antimicrobial Efficacy of Three Root Canal Irrigants.

Zargar N, Dianat O, Asnaashari M, Ganjali M, Zadsirjan S - Iran Endod J (2015)

Bottom Line: The 2.61% solution of NaOCl was significantly more effective than 0.2% CHX and the latter was more efficient than 1% PI for decreasing fungal and microbial infection of dentinal tubules in the presence and absence of SL.The presence of smear layer decreased the efficacy of antimicrobial irrigants.The minimum time required for elimination of fungal/microbial infection was 30 min.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endodontics, Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran;

ABSTRACT

Introduction: One of the main goals of endodontic treatment is to decrease the harboring bacteria within the root canal system and dentinal tubules. This experimental study attempted to investigate the antibacterial efficacy of three root canal irrigants in the presence and absence of smear layer (SL).

Methods and materials: A total of 210 sound extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared. After creating the SL and its removal in half of the samples, they were infected with Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Actinomyces israelii (A. israelii). A total of 180 specimen were used to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of the three irrigants in presence and absence of SL, 24 specimen were placed in the positive and negative controls, 2 samples were utilized for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and 2 were used for Gram staining. Then, they were exposed to irrigants including 2.61% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and 1% povidone-iodine (PI) for 5, 30 and 60 min. Presence/absence of test microorganisms was determined by incubation of specimens in test tubes containing brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth and then measuring the colony forming units (CFU) on BHI agar. A cumulative logistic model was used to analyze the ordinal response.

Results: The 2.61% solution of NaOCl was significantly more effective than 0.2% CHX and the latter was more efficient than 1% PI for decreasing fungal and microbial infection of dentinal tubules in the presence and absence of SL.

Conclusion: The presence of smear layer decreased the efficacy of antimicrobial irrigants. The minimum time required for elimination of fungal/microbial infection was 30 min.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

SEM images showing removal (A) and presence (B) of smear layer, bacterial growth in specimens without (C) and with (D) smear layer, microbial growth controlled by Gram staining in specimen without (E) and with (F) smear layer (400× magnification
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Figure 1: SEM images showing removal (A) and presence (B) of smear layer, bacterial growth in specimens without (C) and with (D) smear layer, microbial growth controlled by Gram staining in specimen without (E) and with (F) smear layer (400× magnification

Mentions: The specimens were rinsed with sterile distilled water for 10 min. Presence and absence of SL was confirmed by assessment of 2 specimens under scanning electron microscopy, SEM (Zeiss DSM 940A, Carl Zeiss Inc., Germany) (Figures 1A and 1B). Then all samples from both SL+ and SL- groups were divided for comparing the efficacy of 2.61% NaOCl, 0.2% CHX (Shahrdaru, Tehran, Iran) and 1% PI (Betadine, Ramin Laboratory, Tehran, Iran) after 5, 30 and 60 min. Also, a total of 24 teeth (12 from each SL+ and SL- groups) were considered as the positive and negative controls and 2 specimens were used to ensure bacterial growth under SEM and Gram staining.


The Effect of Smear Layer on Antimicrobial Efficacy of Three Root Canal Irrigants.

Zargar N, Dianat O, Asnaashari M, Ganjali M, Zadsirjan S - Iran Endod J (2015)

SEM images showing removal (A) and presence (B) of smear layer, bacterial growth in specimens without (C) and with (D) smear layer, microbial growth controlled by Gram staining in specimen without (E) and with (F) smear layer (400× magnification
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4509126&req=5

Figure 1: SEM images showing removal (A) and presence (B) of smear layer, bacterial growth in specimens without (C) and with (D) smear layer, microbial growth controlled by Gram staining in specimen without (E) and with (F) smear layer (400× magnification
Mentions: The specimens were rinsed with sterile distilled water for 10 min. Presence and absence of SL was confirmed by assessment of 2 specimens under scanning electron microscopy, SEM (Zeiss DSM 940A, Carl Zeiss Inc., Germany) (Figures 1A and 1B). Then all samples from both SL+ and SL- groups were divided for comparing the efficacy of 2.61% NaOCl, 0.2% CHX (Shahrdaru, Tehran, Iran) and 1% PI (Betadine, Ramin Laboratory, Tehran, Iran) after 5, 30 and 60 min. Also, a total of 24 teeth (12 from each SL+ and SL- groups) were considered as the positive and negative controls and 2 specimens were used to ensure bacterial growth under SEM and Gram staining.

Bottom Line: The 2.61% solution of NaOCl was significantly more effective than 0.2% CHX and the latter was more efficient than 1% PI for decreasing fungal and microbial infection of dentinal tubules in the presence and absence of SL.The presence of smear layer decreased the efficacy of antimicrobial irrigants.The minimum time required for elimination of fungal/microbial infection was 30 min.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endodontics, Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran;

ABSTRACT

Introduction: One of the main goals of endodontic treatment is to decrease the harboring bacteria within the root canal system and dentinal tubules. This experimental study attempted to investigate the antibacterial efficacy of three root canal irrigants in the presence and absence of smear layer (SL).

Methods and materials: A total of 210 sound extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared. After creating the SL and its removal in half of the samples, they were infected with Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Actinomyces israelii (A. israelii). A total of 180 specimen were used to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of the three irrigants in presence and absence of SL, 24 specimen were placed in the positive and negative controls, 2 samples were utilized for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and 2 were used for Gram staining. Then, they were exposed to irrigants including 2.61% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and 1% povidone-iodine (PI) for 5, 30 and 60 min. Presence/absence of test microorganisms was determined by incubation of specimens in test tubes containing brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth and then measuring the colony forming units (CFU) on BHI agar. A cumulative logistic model was used to analyze the ordinal response.

Results: The 2.61% solution of NaOCl was significantly more effective than 0.2% CHX and the latter was more efficient than 1% PI for decreasing fungal and microbial infection of dentinal tubules in the presence and absence of SL.

Conclusion: The presence of smear layer decreased the efficacy of antimicrobial irrigants. The minimum time required for elimination of fungal/microbial infection was 30 min.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus