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The salinity signature of the cross-shelf exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean: Satellite observations.

Guerrero RA, Piola AR, Fenco H, Matano RP, Combes V, Chao Y, James C, Palma ED, Saraceno M, Strub PT - J Geophys Res Oceans (2014)

Bottom Line: However, the combined analysis of SSS, satellite-derived sea surface elevation and surface velocity data suggest that the precise location of the export of shelf waters depends on offshore circulation patterns, such as the location of the Brazil Malvinas Confluence and mesoscale eddies and meanders of the Brazil Current.The satellite data indicate that in summer, mixtures of low-salinity shelf waters are swiftly driven toward the ocean interior along the axis of the Brazil/Malvinas Confluence.Satellite salinity sensors capture low-salinity detrainment events from shelves SW Atlantic low-salinity detrainments cause highest basin-scale variability In summer low-salinity detrainments cause extended low-salinity anomalies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo Pesquero (INIDEP) Mar del Plata, Argentina.

ABSTRACT

: Satellite-derived sea surface salinity (SSS) data from Aquarius and SMOS are used to study the shelf-open ocean exchanges in the western South Atlantic near 35°S. Away from the tropics, these exchanges cause the largest SSS variability throughout the South Atlantic. The data reveal a well-defined seasonal pattern of SSS during the analyzed period and of the location of the export of low-salinity shelf waters. In spring and summer, low-salinity waters over the shelf expand offshore and are transferred to the open ocean primarily southeast of the river mouth (from 36°S to 37°30'S). In contrast, in fall and winter, low-salinity waters extend along a coastal plume and the export path to the open ocean distributes along the offshore edge of the plume. The strong seasonal SSS pattern is modulated by the seasonality of the along-shelf component of the wind stress over the shelf. However, the combined analysis of SSS, satellite-derived sea surface elevation and surface velocity data suggest that the precise location of the export of shelf waters depends on offshore circulation patterns, such as the location of the Brazil Malvinas Confluence and mesoscale eddies and meanders of the Brazil Current. The satellite data indicate that in summer, mixtures of low-salinity shelf waters are swiftly driven toward the ocean interior along the axis of the Brazil/Malvinas Confluence. In winter, episodic wind reversals force the low-salinity coastal plume offshore where they mix with tropical waters within the Brazil Current and create a warmer variety of low-salinity waters in the open ocean.

Key points: Satellite salinity sensors capture low-salinity detrainment events from shelves SW Atlantic low-salinity detrainments cause highest basin-scale variability In summer low-salinity detrainments cause extended low-salinity anomalies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

SSS distributions from (a) Aq and (b) SMOS, (c) SST and (d) surface chlorophyll concentration from MODIS Aqua for 11 December 2011. Also shown in each figure are the OSCAR velocities for the same date. The gray thick line indicates the 200 m isobath.
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fig05: SSS distributions from (a) Aq and (b) SMOS, (c) SST and (d) surface chlorophyll concentration from MODIS Aqua for 11 December 2011. Also shown in each figure are the OSCAR velocities for the same date. The gray thick line indicates the 200 m isobath.

Mentions: SSS-SMOS data are used to cross-validate low-salinity detrainment events from the shelf on the new SSS-Aq weekly fields and to extend the SSS data back to January 2010. To produce SSS-SMOS fields (e.g., Figure 5b) a kriging interpolation method was applied using SMOS L2 9 day weighted average with a time resolution of 3 days, spatial resolution of 0.25° × 0.25° (http://www.smos-bec.icm.csic.es/), and a search radius of 0.75° × 0.75°. This interpolation method was used to produce a grid of the same accuracy and spatial resolution and to fill data gaps on the original L2 product, since this technique is optimal, unbiased and minimizes the variance of the estimates.


The salinity signature of the cross-shelf exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean: Satellite observations.

Guerrero RA, Piola AR, Fenco H, Matano RP, Combes V, Chao Y, James C, Palma ED, Saraceno M, Strub PT - J Geophys Res Oceans (2014)

SSS distributions from (a) Aq and (b) SMOS, (c) SST and (d) surface chlorophyll concentration from MODIS Aqua for 11 December 2011. Also shown in each figure are the OSCAR velocities for the same date. The gray thick line indicates the 200 m isobath.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508963&req=5

fig05: SSS distributions from (a) Aq and (b) SMOS, (c) SST and (d) surface chlorophyll concentration from MODIS Aqua for 11 December 2011. Also shown in each figure are the OSCAR velocities for the same date. The gray thick line indicates the 200 m isobath.
Mentions: SSS-SMOS data are used to cross-validate low-salinity detrainment events from the shelf on the new SSS-Aq weekly fields and to extend the SSS data back to January 2010. To produce SSS-SMOS fields (e.g., Figure 5b) a kriging interpolation method was applied using SMOS L2 9 day weighted average with a time resolution of 3 days, spatial resolution of 0.25° × 0.25° (http://www.smos-bec.icm.csic.es/), and a search radius of 0.75° × 0.75°. This interpolation method was used to produce a grid of the same accuracy and spatial resolution and to fill data gaps on the original L2 product, since this technique is optimal, unbiased and minimizes the variance of the estimates.

Bottom Line: However, the combined analysis of SSS, satellite-derived sea surface elevation and surface velocity data suggest that the precise location of the export of shelf waters depends on offshore circulation patterns, such as the location of the Brazil Malvinas Confluence and mesoscale eddies and meanders of the Brazil Current.The satellite data indicate that in summer, mixtures of low-salinity shelf waters are swiftly driven toward the ocean interior along the axis of the Brazil/Malvinas Confluence.Satellite salinity sensors capture low-salinity detrainment events from shelves SW Atlantic low-salinity detrainments cause highest basin-scale variability In summer low-salinity detrainments cause extended low-salinity anomalies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo Pesquero (INIDEP) Mar del Plata, Argentina.

ABSTRACT

: Satellite-derived sea surface salinity (SSS) data from Aquarius and SMOS are used to study the shelf-open ocean exchanges in the western South Atlantic near 35°S. Away from the tropics, these exchanges cause the largest SSS variability throughout the South Atlantic. The data reveal a well-defined seasonal pattern of SSS during the analyzed period and of the location of the export of low-salinity shelf waters. In spring and summer, low-salinity waters over the shelf expand offshore and are transferred to the open ocean primarily southeast of the river mouth (from 36°S to 37°30'S). In contrast, in fall and winter, low-salinity waters extend along a coastal plume and the export path to the open ocean distributes along the offshore edge of the plume. The strong seasonal SSS pattern is modulated by the seasonality of the along-shelf component of the wind stress over the shelf. However, the combined analysis of SSS, satellite-derived sea surface elevation and surface velocity data suggest that the precise location of the export of shelf waters depends on offshore circulation patterns, such as the location of the Brazil Malvinas Confluence and mesoscale eddies and meanders of the Brazil Current. The satellite data indicate that in summer, mixtures of low-salinity shelf waters are swiftly driven toward the ocean interior along the axis of the Brazil/Malvinas Confluence. In winter, episodic wind reversals force the low-salinity coastal plume offshore where they mix with tropical waters within the Brazil Current and create a warmer variety of low-salinity waters in the open ocean.

Key points: Satellite salinity sensors capture low-salinity detrainment events from shelves SW Atlantic low-salinity detrainments cause highest basin-scale variability In summer low-salinity detrainments cause extended low-salinity anomalies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus