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A Large Refilling Cystic Lesion In A Gastric Bypass Patient.

Tewari V, Tewari D, Antunez D, Iqbal S, Williams S - ACG Case Rep J (2015)

Bottom Line: We describe a patient with a history of gastric bypass and chronic alcoholism suffering from a rare Peterson's hernia resulting from her surgery.There are a few case reports in which afferent loop obstruction was misdiagnosed as pancreatic pseudocyst after Billroth II gastrectomy.Ours is the first in which Peterson's hernia was initially misdiagnosed as a pancreatic pseudocyst in a gastric bypass patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New York Medical College, Metropolitan and Woodhull Hospitals, New York, NY.

ABSTRACT
We describe a patient with a history of gastric bypass and chronic alcoholism suffering from a rare Peterson's hernia resulting from her surgery. There are a few case reports in which afferent loop obstruction was misdiagnosed as pancreatic pseudocyst after Billroth II gastrectomy. Ours is the first in which Peterson's hernia was initially misdiagnosed as a pancreatic pseudocyst in a gastric bypass patient.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagram of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass illustrating Petersen's space.
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Figure 3: Diagram of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass illustrating Petersen's space.

Mentions: There are 3 potential sites for the herniation: at the defect in the transverse mesocolon through which the Roux loop passes, at the mesenteric defect at the enteroenterostomy, and behind the Roux limb mesentery.17 This third type, developing behind Roux limb mesentry through the potential gap between the jejunal mesentery and mesocolon, is called Petersen's hernia. It is one of the rarest types and can be retrocolic Petersen or antecolic Petersen, based on where the Roux loop is placed (Figure 3).1


A Large Refilling Cystic Lesion In A Gastric Bypass Patient.

Tewari V, Tewari D, Antunez D, Iqbal S, Williams S - ACG Case Rep J (2015)

Diagram of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass illustrating Petersen's space.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508958&req=5

Figure 3: Diagram of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass illustrating Petersen's space.
Mentions: There are 3 potential sites for the herniation: at the defect in the transverse mesocolon through which the Roux loop passes, at the mesenteric defect at the enteroenterostomy, and behind the Roux limb mesentery.17 This third type, developing behind Roux limb mesentry through the potential gap between the jejunal mesentery and mesocolon, is called Petersen's hernia. It is one of the rarest types and can be retrocolic Petersen or antecolic Petersen, based on where the Roux loop is placed (Figure 3).1

Bottom Line: We describe a patient with a history of gastric bypass and chronic alcoholism suffering from a rare Peterson's hernia resulting from her surgery.There are a few case reports in which afferent loop obstruction was misdiagnosed as pancreatic pseudocyst after Billroth II gastrectomy.Ours is the first in which Peterson's hernia was initially misdiagnosed as a pancreatic pseudocyst in a gastric bypass patient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New York Medical College, Metropolitan and Woodhull Hospitals, New York, NY.

ABSTRACT
We describe a patient with a history of gastric bypass and chronic alcoholism suffering from a rare Peterson's hernia resulting from her surgery. There are a few case reports in which afferent loop obstruction was misdiagnosed as pancreatic pseudocyst after Billroth II gastrectomy. Ours is the first in which Peterson's hernia was initially misdiagnosed as a pancreatic pseudocyst in a gastric bypass patient.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus