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Heating and ultraviolet light activate anti-stress gene functions in humans.

Semenkov VF, Michalski AI, Sapozhnikov AM - Front Genet (2015)

Bottom Line: We propose that the effect of environmental factors on AS proteins can cause an adverse increase in oxidative stress levels due to the functional reduction of anti-stress genes.This effect may be a result of the impact of the hormone adrenaline on the functions of anti-stress genes.In contrast, dexamethasone from the other stress hormone group did not evoke the same effect at the same concentrations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University Moscow, Russia.

ABSTRACT
Different environmental factors (i.e., toxins, heavy metals, ultraviolet (UV) rays, and X-radiation) cause damage to DNA, cell membranes and other organelles and induce oxidative stress, which results in the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by phagocytes. All types of cell stress are accompanied by the activation of anti-stress genes that can suppress ROS synthesis. We hypothesized that different environmental factors would affect organisms through the activation of anti-stress genes by autologous serum (AS) proteins, followed by the synthesis of molecules that increase cell resistance to oxidative stress. The goal of this work was to study the influence of AS on ROS production by peripheral blood neutrophils isolated from donors in different age groups. Neutrophils were isolated from 59 donors (38-94 years old). AS was heated at 100°C for 30 s. or irradiated by UV light at 200-280 nm and 8 W for 10 min. Neutrophils were exposed to heat shock at 42°C for 1 min. (short-term heating stress) or 43°C for 10 min., followed by the determination of the chemiluminescence reaction induced by zymosan. AS can increase or decrease ROS production by neutrophils depending on the structure of the proteins in the serum; these structures can be changed by heating or UV treatment and the temperature of their interaction (4 or 37°C). We propose that the effect of environmental factors on AS proteins can cause an adverse increase in oxidative stress levels due to the functional reduction of anti-stress genes. We found a negative correlation between the quantity of intracellular Hsp70 and levels of intracellular ROS production following 10 min of heat shock at 43°C. Short-term heating stress (1 min) at 42°C was followed by a prominent reduction in ROS production. This effect may be a result of the impact of the hormone adrenaline on the functions of anti-stress genes. Indeed, the same effect was observed after treatment of the neutrophils with adrenaline at concentrations of 10(-4) and 10(-5) M. In contrast, dexamethasone from the other stress hormone group did not evoke the same effect at the same concentrations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Influence of AS on ROS production by neutrophils from long-lived patients above 90 years of age (A), patients between 60 and 75 years of age (B) and middle aged patients from 40 to 59 years of age (C). Control: neutrophils in colorless Hanks without AS were centrifugated at 4°C 10 min and resuspended in 100 μl of colorless Hanks. The line above the bar indicates the SD; n – number of patients.
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Figure 2: Influence of AS on ROS production by neutrophils from long-lived patients above 90 years of age (A), patients between 60 and 75 years of age (B) and middle aged patients from 40 to 59 years of age (C). Control: neutrophils in colorless Hanks without AS were centrifugated at 4°C 10 min and resuspended in 100 μl of colorless Hanks. The line above the bar indicates the SD; n – number of patients.

Mentions: Centrifugation and resuspension procedures have been reported to reduce the neutrophil response to zymosan and subsequent ROS production (Figure 1, control 1 and 2). Adsorption of normal and heated AS onto neutrophils caused an increase in ROS production at AS dilutions of 1:10 and 1:20 in comparison with control 1. All patients were divided into three groups: long-lived (A) – mean age 93 years, senile and elderly patients (B) – mean age 71.4 years, and middle and young patients (C) – mean age 38 years (Figure 2). Heated AS evoked more ROS production compared to normal AS (p < 0.01) for groups B and C. Interestingly, the stimulation of ROS production by zymosan after treatment of the neutrophils from the long-lived group with normal AS did not differ significantly from the control; however, ROS production in the cell samples from the long-lived group after treatment of the neutrophils with heated AS was higher than the corresponding values in groups B and C. Data presented in Figure 2 demonstrate that in long-lived group of patients effect of AS on the ROS production is higher than in mean age and young patients groups.


Heating and ultraviolet light activate anti-stress gene functions in humans.

Semenkov VF, Michalski AI, Sapozhnikov AM - Front Genet (2015)

Influence of AS on ROS production by neutrophils from long-lived patients above 90 years of age (A), patients between 60 and 75 years of age (B) and middle aged patients from 40 to 59 years of age (C). Control: neutrophils in colorless Hanks without AS were centrifugated at 4°C 10 min and resuspended in 100 μl of colorless Hanks. The line above the bar indicates the SD; n – number of patients.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508853&req=5

Figure 2: Influence of AS on ROS production by neutrophils from long-lived patients above 90 years of age (A), patients between 60 and 75 years of age (B) and middle aged patients from 40 to 59 years of age (C). Control: neutrophils in colorless Hanks without AS were centrifugated at 4°C 10 min and resuspended in 100 μl of colorless Hanks. The line above the bar indicates the SD; n – number of patients.
Mentions: Centrifugation and resuspension procedures have been reported to reduce the neutrophil response to zymosan and subsequent ROS production (Figure 1, control 1 and 2). Adsorption of normal and heated AS onto neutrophils caused an increase in ROS production at AS dilutions of 1:10 and 1:20 in comparison with control 1. All patients were divided into three groups: long-lived (A) – mean age 93 years, senile and elderly patients (B) – mean age 71.4 years, and middle and young patients (C) – mean age 38 years (Figure 2). Heated AS evoked more ROS production compared to normal AS (p < 0.01) for groups B and C. Interestingly, the stimulation of ROS production by zymosan after treatment of the neutrophils from the long-lived group with normal AS did not differ significantly from the control; however, ROS production in the cell samples from the long-lived group after treatment of the neutrophils with heated AS was higher than the corresponding values in groups B and C. Data presented in Figure 2 demonstrate that in long-lived group of patients effect of AS on the ROS production is higher than in mean age and young patients groups.

Bottom Line: We propose that the effect of environmental factors on AS proteins can cause an adverse increase in oxidative stress levels due to the functional reduction of anti-stress genes.This effect may be a result of the impact of the hormone adrenaline on the functions of anti-stress genes.In contrast, dexamethasone from the other stress hormone group did not evoke the same effect at the same concentrations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University Moscow, Russia.

ABSTRACT
Different environmental factors (i.e., toxins, heavy metals, ultraviolet (UV) rays, and X-radiation) cause damage to DNA, cell membranes and other organelles and induce oxidative stress, which results in the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by phagocytes. All types of cell stress are accompanied by the activation of anti-stress genes that can suppress ROS synthesis. We hypothesized that different environmental factors would affect organisms through the activation of anti-stress genes by autologous serum (AS) proteins, followed by the synthesis of molecules that increase cell resistance to oxidative stress. The goal of this work was to study the influence of AS on ROS production by peripheral blood neutrophils isolated from donors in different age groups. Neutrophils were isolated from 59 donors (38-94 years old). AS was heated at 100°C for 30 s. or irradiated by UV light at 200-280 nm and 8 W for 10 min. Neutrophils were exposed to heat shock at 42°C for 1 min. (short-term heating stress) or 43°C for 10 min., followed by the determination of the chemiluminescence reaction induced by zymosan. AS can increase or decrease ROS production by neutrophils depending on the structure of the proteins in the serum; these structures can be changed by heating or UV treatment and the temperature of their interaction (4 or 37°C). We propose that the effect of environmental factors on AS proteins can cause an adverse increase in oxidative stress levels due to the functional reduction of anti-stress genes. We found a negative correlation between the quantity of intracellular Hsp70 and levels of intracellular ROS production following 10 min of heat shock at 43°C. Short-term heating stress (1 min) at 42°C was followed by a prominent reduction in ROS production. This effect may be a result of the impact of the hormone adrenaline on the functions of anti-stress genes. Indeed, the same effect was observed after treatment of the neutrophils with adrenaline at concentrations of 10(-4) and 10(-5) M. In contrast, dexamethasone from the other stress hormone group did not evoke the same effect at the same concentrations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus