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Trabecular Variant of Juvenile Aggressive Ossifying Fibroma.

Rahman T, Hashmi GS, Ansari H - Rare Tumors (2015)

Bottom Line: It appears in early age and in 79% of patients is diagnosed before 15.It has two histological variants: psammomatoid and trabecular, with the latter being less common with a stronger tendency to recur.In this article, we present a case of trabecular JAOF, in which treatment could not be given despite the availability of all requisites for surgery and good financial status, due to parental indifference and negligence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Aligarh Muslim University , India.

ABSTRACT
Juvenile aggressive ossifying fibroma (JAOF) is an uncommon benign lesion which is distinctly aggressive in behavior with high tendency for recurrence. It appears in early age and in 79% of patients is diagnosed before 15. It has two histological variants: psammomatoid and trabecular, with the latter being less common with a stronger tendency to recur. In this article, we present a case of trabecular JAOF, in which treatment could not be given despite the availability of all requisites for surgery and good financial status, due to parental indifference and negligence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A) Intraoral view of the lesion demonstrating the extent of the lesion. B) Coronal section of computed tomography scan demonstrating the expansile, destructive lesion with cortical boundary. C) Histo-pathological picture of the lesion demonstrating large area of cellular fibrous tissue with plump, ovoid to spindled fibroblasts and some areas of collagen and irregular islands of immature bony tissue along with mature bony trabeculae embedded in stroma along with scattered multinucleated giant cells.
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fig001: A) Intraoral view of the lesion demonstrating the extent of the lesion. B) Coronal section of computed tomography scan demonstrating the expansile, destructive lesion with cortical boundary. C) Histo-pathological picture of the lesion demonstrating large area of cellular fibrous tissue with plump, ovoid to spindled fibroblasts and some areas of collagen and irregular islands of immature bony tissue along with mature bony trabeculae embedded in stroma along with scattered multinucleated giant cells.

Mentions: A 8-year-old male patient reported to the outpatient department with the main complaint of swelling of left side of face. The patient’s parents gave a history of a rapidly growing painless swelling, which first became apparent around a month before. There was no history of any trauma or tooth pain. On general examination, mild pallor and weight loss were the only apparent findings. Facial asymmetry was distinguishable with an expansible lesion of about 4×5 cm in size, involving left side of face. The anterior extent was along a line drawn perpendicular to medial canthus of left eye. Posteriorly, the extent was up to the anterior border of masseter muscle. Superior and inferior boundaries corresponded to infra-orbital margin as well as zygomatic arch and a line joining left corner of oral commissure with the point of attachment of ear lobule, respectively. The overlying skin was normal. The left ala of nose was elevated with slight reduced display of vermillion of lateral half of upper lip. Bilateral nasal patency was present. Palpation revealed an underlying non-tender, bony hard swelling with smooth texture. Paresthesia was absent with no associated lymph node involvement. Intra-orally, a spherical swelling was apparent, obliterating left maxillary vestibule and extending from lateral incisor to deciduous second molar (Figure 1A). The overlying mucosa was normal in appearance. None of the teeth were mobile, carious or non-vital.


Trabecular Variant of Juvenile Aggressive Ossifying Fibroma.

Rahman T, Hashmi GS, Ansari H - Rare Tumors (2015)

A) Intraoral view of the lesion demonstrating the extent of the lesion. B) Coronal section of computed tomography scan demonstrating the expansile, destructive lesion with cortical boundary. C) Histo-pathological picture of the lesion demonstrating large area of cellular fibrous tissue with plump, ovoid to spindled fibroblasts and some areas of collagen and irregular islands of immature bony tissue along with mature bony trabeculae embedded in stroma along with scattered multinucleated giant cells.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508649&req=5

fig001: A) Intraoral view of the lesion demonstrating the extent of the lesion. B) Coronal section of computed tomography scan demonstrating the expansile, destructive lesion with cortical boundary. C) Histo-pathological picture of the lesion demonstrating large area of cellular fibrous tissue with plump, ovoid to spindled fibroblasts and some areas of collagen and irregular islands of immature bony tissue along with mature bony trabeculae embedded in stroma along with scattered multinucleated giant cells.
Mentions: A 8-year-old male patient reported to the outpatient department with the main complaint of swelling of left side of face. The patient’s parents gave a history of a rapidly growing painless swelling, which first became apparent around a month before. There was no history of any trauma or tooth pain. On general examination, mild pallor and weight loss were the only apparent findings. Facial asymmetry was distinguishable with an expansible lesion of about 4×5 cm in size, involving left side of face. The anterior extent was along a line drawn perpendicular to medial canthus of left eye. Posteriorly, the extent was up to the anterior border of masseter muscle. Superior and inferior boundaries corresponded to infra-orbital margin as well as zygomatic arch and a line joining left corner of oral commissure with the point of attachment of ear lobule, respectively. The overlying skin was normal. The left ala of nose was elevated with slight reduced display of vermillion of lateral half of upper lip. Bilateral nasal patency was present. Palpation revealed an underlying non-tender, bony hard swelling with smooth texture. Paresthesia was absent with no associated lymph node involvement. Intra-orally, a spherical swelling was apparent, obliterating left maxillary vestibule and extending from lateral incisor to deciduous second molar (Figure 1A). The overlying mucosa was normal in appearance. None of the teeth were mobile, carious or non-vital.

Bottom Line: It appears in early age and in 79% of patients is diagnosed before 15.It has two histological variants: psammomatoid and trabecular, with the latter being less common with a stronger tendency to recur.In this article, we present a case of trabecular JAOF, in which treatment could not be given despite the availability of all requisites for surgery and good financial status, due to parental indifference and negligence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Aligarh Muslim University , India.

ABSTRACT
Juvenile aggressive ossifying fibroma (JAOF) is an uncommon benign lesion which is distinctly aggressive in behavior with high tendency for recurrence. It appears in early age and in 79% of patients is diagnosed before 15. It has two histological variants: psammomatoid and trabecular, with the latter being less common with a stronger tendency to recur. In this article, we present a case of trabecular JAOF, in which treatment could not be given despite the availability of all requisites for surgery and good financial status, due to parental indifference and negligence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus