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On the Collagen Mineralization. A Review.

Tomoaia G, Pasca RD - Clujul Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Collagen mineralization (CM) is a challenging process that has received a lot of attention in the past years.In spite of the great number of studies regarding collagen mineralization, its mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro, is not completely understood.Some of the methods used in vitro and investigation methods are reviewed here.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Orthopedic Department, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

ABSTRACT
Collagen mineralization (CM) is a challenging process that has received a lot of attention in the past years. Among the reasons for this interest, the key role is the importance of collagen and hydroxyapatite in natural bone, as major constituents. Different protocols of mineralization have been developed, specially using simulated body fluid (SBF) and many methods have been used to characterize the systems obtained, starting with methods of determining the mineral content (XRD, FTIR, Raman, High-Resolution Spectral Ultrasound Imaging), continuing with imaging methods (AFM, TEM, SEM, Fluorescence Microscopy), thermal analysis (DSC and TGA), evaluation of the mechanical and biological properties, including statistical methods and molecular modeling. In spite of the great number of studies regarding collagen mineralization, its mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro, is not completely understood. Some of the methods used in vitro and investigation methods are reviewed here.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structures of the collagen main constituents: proline, hydroxyproline and glycine.
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f1-cm8801p15: Chemical structures of the collagen main constituents: proline, hydroxyproline and glycine.

Mentions: Collagen is a complex protein having a repetitive sequence of amino-acids, in particular: glycine, proline and hydroxyproline (Fig. 1). More than 20 types of collagen have been identified until now, but collagen type I and collagen III are the most abundant in nature [3–6]. Collagen can be found in different parts of the human body, such as: cornea, skin, tendon, cartilage, and bone [7]. Collagen type I is the most abundant protein in the natural bone [8–9].


On the Collagen Mineralization. A Review.

Tomoaia G, Pasca RD - Clujul Med (2015)

Chemical structures of the collagen main constituents: proline, hydroxyproline and glycine.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508610&req=5

f1-cm8801p15: Chemical structures of the collagen main constituents: proline, hydroxyproline and glycine.
Mentions: Collagen is a complex protein having a repetitive sequence of amino-acids, in particular: glycine, proline and hydroxyproline (Fig. 1). More than 20 types of collagen have been identified until now, but collagen type I and collagen III are the most abundant in nature [3–6]. Collagen can be found in different parts of the human body, such as: cornea, skin, tendon, cartilage, and bone [7]. Collagen type I is the most abundant protein in the natural bone [8–9].

Bottom Line: Collagen mineralization (CM) is a challenging process that has received a lot of attention in the past years.In spite of the great number of studies regarding collagen mineralization, its mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro, is not completely understood.Some of the methods used in vitro and investigation methods are reviewed here.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Orthopedic Department, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

ABSTRACT
Collagen mineralization (CM) is a challenging process that has received a lot of attention in the past years. Among the reasons for this interest, the key role is the importance of collagen and hydroxyapatite in natural bone, as major constituents. Different protocols of mineralization have been developed, specially using simulated body fluid (SBF) and many methods have been used to characterize the systems obtained, starting with methods of determining the mineral content (XRD, FTIR, Raman, High-Resolution Spectral Ultrasound Imaging), continuing with imaging methods (AFM, TEM, SEM, Fluorescence Microscopy), thermal analysis (DSC and TGA), evaluation of the mechanical and biological properties, including statistical methods and molecular modeling. In spite of the great number of studies regarding collagen mineralization, its mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro, is not completely understood. Some of the methods used in vitro and investigation methods are reviewed here.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus