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Unveiling hidden ferrimagnetism and giant magnetoelectricity in polar magnet Fe2Mo3O8.

Wang Y, Pascut GL, Gao B, Tyson TA, Haule K, Kiryukhin V, Cheong SW - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Magnetoelectric (ME) effect is recognized for its utility for low-power electronic devices.Largest ME coefficients are often associated with phase transitions in which ferroelectricity is induced by magnetic order.The observed effects are associated with a hidden ferrimagnetic order unveiled by application of a magnetic field.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

ABSTRACT
Magnetoelectric (ME) effect is recognized for its utility for low-power electronic devices. Largest ME coefficients are often associated with phase transitions in which ferroelectricity is induced by magnetic order. Unfortunately, in these systems, large ME response is revealed only upon elaborate poling procedures. These procedures may become unnecessary in single-polar-domain crystals of polar magnets. Here we report giant ME effects in a polar magnet Fe2Mo3O8 at temperatures as high as 60 K. Polarization jumps of 0.3 μC/cm(2), and repeated mutual control of ferroelectric and magnetic moments with differential ME coefficients on the order of 10(4) ps/m are achieved. Importantly, no electric or magnetic poling is needed, as necessary for applications. The sign of the ME coefficients can be switched by changing the applied "bias" magnetic field. The observed effects are associated with a hidden ferrimagnetic order unveiled by application of a magnetic field.

No MeSH data available.


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Reproducible magnetoelectric control of the electric polarization and magnetization with giant ME coefficients.(a) Periodic modulation of electric polarization (blue) induced by a magnetic field linearly varying between 3.25 T and 3.5 T (black) at 55 K. (b) Periodic modulation of magnetization (green) induced by an electric field (red) linearly varying between ±16.6 kV/cm, for T = 55 K and  = 3.345 T. (c) Phase diagram of Fe2Mo3O8. Black dots determined from M(H), and red diamonds – from χ(T) curves. (d) Electric field dependence of magnetization for Fe2Mo3O8 (from panel (b), averaged), and for Ni3TeO6 (×10). The insert illustrates the experimental setup, with directions of the applied fields shown. In all figures, the magnetization, polarization, and the applied fields are along the c axis.
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f4: Reproducible magnetoelectric control of the electric polarization and magnetization with giant ME coefficients.(a) Periodic modulation of electric polarization (blue) induced by a magnetic field linearly varying between 3.25 T and 3.5 T (black) at 55 K. (b) Periodic modulation of magnetization (green) induced by an electric field (red) linearly varying between ±16.6 kV/cm, for T = 55 K and  = 3.345 T. (c) Phase diagram of Fe2Mo3O8. Black dots determined from M(H), and red diamonds – from χ(T) curves. (d) Electric field dependence of magnetization for Fe2Mo3O8 (from panel (b), averaged), and for Ni3TeO6 (×10). The insert illustrates the experimental setup, with directions of the applied fields shown. In all figures, the magnetization, polarization, and the applied fields are along the c axis.

Mentions: The sharpness of the field-induced transitions shown in Figs 2(d) and 3(a,b) gives rise to giant values of the differential ME coefficient dP/dH in the vicinity of the transition field, reaching almost −104 ps/m for T = 55 K. (Consult Supplementary Fig. 2(d) for the field-dependent dP/dH for different temperatures). Combined with absence of poling requirements and the small hysteresis (0.02 T at 55 K, 0.007 T at 58 K), it leads to giant, reproducible, and almost linear variation of P with H, as shown in Fig. 4(a) for T = 55 K. In the range shown, ΔP oscillates, varying by 0.08 μC/cm2 as H goes from 3.25 to 3.5 T and back. The inverse effect, in which an applied electric field (E) changes the magnetization is also giant, reproducible, and linear, as shown in Fig. 4(b). At T = 55 K and H = 3.345 T, the magnetization varies by 0.35 μB/f.u. in the field oscillating between ±16.6 kV/cm, resulting in the dM/dE of −5700 ps/m. Similarly large differential ME coefficients dP/dH and dM/dE are observed at other points on the AFM-FRM transition boundary shown in Fig. 4(c). These coefficients are more than an order of magnitude larger than those reported for the polar magnet Ni3TeO6 (ref. 24), see Fig. 4(d).


Unveiling hidden ferrimagnetism and giant magnetoelectricity in polar magnet Fe2Mo3O8.

Wang Y, Pascut GL, Gao B, Tyson TA, Haule K, Kiryukhin V, Cheong SW - Sci Rep (2015)

Reproducible magnetoelectric control of the electric polarization and magnetization with giant ME coefficients.(a) Periodic modulation of electric polarization (blue) induced by a magnetic field linearly varying between 3.25 T and 3.5 T (black) at 55 K. (b) Periodic modulation of magnetization (green) induced by an electric field (red) linearly varying between ±16.6 kV/cm, for T = 55 K and  = 3.345 T. (c) Phase diagram of Fe2Mo3O8. Black dots determined from M(H), and red diamonds – from χ(T) curves. (d) Electric field dependence of magnetization for Fe2Mo3O8 (from panel (b), averaged), and for Ni3TeO6 (×10). The insert illustrates the experimental setup, with directions of the applied fields shown. In all figures, the magnetization, polarization, and the applied fields are along the c axis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508583&req=5

f4: Reproducible magnetoelectric control of the electric polarization and magnetization with giant ME coefficients.(a) Periodic modulation of electric polarization (blue) induced by a magnetic field linearly varying between 3.25 T and 3.5 T (black) at 55 K. (b) Periodic modulation of magnetization (green) induced by an electric field (red) linearly varying between ±16.6 kV/cm, for T = 55 K and  = 3.345 T. (c) Phase diagram of Fe2Mo3O8. Black dots determined from M(H), and red diamonds – from χ(T) curves. (d) Electric field dependence of magnetization for Fe2Mo3O8 (from panel (b), averaged), and for Ni3TeO6 (×10). The insert illustrates the experimental setup, with directions of the applied fields shown. In all figures, the magnetization, polarization, and the applied fields are along the c axis.
Mentions: The sharpness of the field-induced transitions shown in Figs 2(d) and 3(a,b) gives rise to giant values of the differential ME coefficient dP/dH in the vicinity of the transition field, reaching almost −104 ps/m for T = 55 K. (Consult Supplementary Fig. 2(d) for the field-dependent dP/dH for different temperatures). Combined with absence of poling requirements and the small hysteresis (0.02 T at 55 K, 0.007 T at 58 K), it leads to giant, reproducible, and almost linear variation of P with H, as shown in Fig. 4(a) for T = 55 K. In the range shown, ΔP oscillates, varying by 0.08 μC/cm2 as H goes from 3.25 to 3.5 T and back. The inverse effect, in which an applied electric field (E) changes the magnetization is also giant, reproducible, and linear, as shown in Fig. 4(b). At T = 55 K and H = 3.345 T, the magnetization varies by 0.35 μB/f.u. in the field oscillating between ±16.6 kV/cm, resulting in the dM/dE of −5700 ps/m. Similarly large differential ME coefficients dP/dH and dM/dE are observed at other points on the AFM-FRM transition boundary shown in Fig. 4(c). These coefficients are more than an order of magnitude larger than those reported for the polar magnet Ni3TeO6 (ref. 24), see Fig. 4(d).

Bottom Line: Magnetoelectric (ME) effect is recognized for its utility for low-power electronic devices.Largest ME coefficients are often associated with phase transitions in which ferroelectricity is induced by magnetic order.The observed effects are associated with a hidden ferrimagnetic order unveiled by application of a magnetic field.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

ABSTRACT
Magnetoelectric (ME) effect is recognized for its utility for low-power electronic devices. Largest ME coefficients are often associated with phase transitions in which ferroelectricity is induced by magnetic order. Unfortunately, in these systems, large ME response is revealed only upon elaborate poling procedures. These procedures may become unnecessary in single-polar-domain crystals of polar magnets. Here we report giant ME effects in a polar magnet Fe2Mo3O8 at temperatures as high as 60 K. Polarization jumps of 0.3 μC/cm(2), and repeated mutual control of ferroelectric and magnetic moments with differential ME coefficients on the order of 10(4) ps/m are achieved. Importantly, no electric or magnetic poling is needed, as necessary for applications. The sign of the ME coefficients can be switched by changing the applied "bias" magnetic field. The observed effects are associated with a hidden ferrimagnetic order unveiled by application of a magnetic field.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus