Limits...
Pathology Reporting of Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy: A Proposal of the Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Group.

Jung CK, Min HS, Park HJ, Song DE, Kim JH, Park SY, Yoo H, Shin MK, Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Gro - J Pathol Transl Med (2015)

Bottom Line: However, there is no consensus on the pathology reporting system for thyroid CNB.The Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Group held a conference on thyroid CNB pathology and developed guidelines through contributions from the participants.This article discusses the outcome of the discussions that led to a consensus on the pathology reporting of thyroid CNB.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Hospital Pathology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
In recent years throughout Korea, the use of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) has become common for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid nodules. However, there is no consensus on the pathology reporting system for thyroid CNB. The Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Group held a conference on thyroid CNB pathology and developed guidelines through contributions from the participants. This article discusses the outcome of the discussions that led to a consensus on the pathology reporting of thyroid CNB.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) The core needle biopsy shows a microfollicular proliferative lesion and surrounding normal tissue. (B) The high-power view of the boxed area in Fig. 4A shows that the lesion has no nuclear atypia or fibrous capsule. This lesion should be diagnosed as a benign follicular nodule. (C, D) When microfollicular proliferative lesions show a definite fibrous capsule (arrows) in the core needle biopsy, the specimens should be diagnosed as a follicular neoplasm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508566&req=5

f4-jptm-49-4-288: (A) The core needle biopsy shows a microfollicular proliferative lesion and surrounding normal tissue. (B) The high-power view of the boxed area in Fig. 4A shows that the lesion has no nuclear atypia or fibrous capsule. This lesion should be diagnosed as a benign follicular nodule. (C, D) When microfollicular proliferative lesions show a definite fibrous capsule (arrows) in the core needle biopsy, the specimens should be diagnosed as a follicular neoplasm.

Mentions: In CNB and FNAC, the term “follicular neoplasm or suspicious for a follicular neoplasm” is used to encompass neoplastic lesions with follicular proliferative patterns (e.g., follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, follicular variant of papillary carcinoma, follicular variant of medullary carcinoma) [2,3] The histologic diagnosis of “follicular neoplasm or suspicious for a follicular neoplasm” in a CNB specimen is based on the presence of a fibrous capsule and microscopic features that differ from the adjacent thyroid parenchyma (Fig. 4). Follicular cells do not show the typical nuclear features of papillary carcinomas. It is important to identify a well-formed fibrous capsule in the CNB specimen. The FNAC diagnosis for follicular neoplasm is primarily based on the presence of microfollicular or trabecular architecture and the lack of colloid. In a CNB specimen, the growth patterns of a follicular neoplasm can be microfollicular, normofollicular, solid, or trabecular when a fibrous tumor capsule is identified in the sample. Examples in this category include microfollicular proliferative lesions with fibrous capsules, mixed microfollicular and normofollicular proliferative lesions with fibrous capsules, solid or trabecular follicular lesions with fibrous capsules, Hürthle cell proliferative lesions with fibrous capsules, and follicular neoplasms or samples suspicious for follicular neoplasms with focal nuclear atypia.


Pathology Reporting of Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy: A Proposal of the Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Group.

Jung CK, Min HS, Park HJ, Song DE, Kim JH, Park SY, Yoo H, Shin MK, Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Gro - J Pathol Transl Med (2015)

(A) The core needle biopsy shows a microfollicular proliferative lesion and surrounding normal tissue. (B) The high-power view of the boxed area in Fig. 4A shows that the lesion has no nuclear atypia or fibrous capsule. This lesion should be diagnosed as a benign follicular nodule. (C, D) When microfollicular proliferative lesions show a definite fibrous capsule (arrows) in the core needle biopsy, the specimens should be diagnosed as a follicular neoplasm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508566&req=5

f4-jptm-49-4-288: (A) The core needle biopsy shows a microfollicular proliferative lesion and surrounding normal tissue. (B) The high-power view of the boxed area in Fig. 4A shows that the lesion has no nuclear atypia or fibrous capsule. This lesion should be diagnosed as a benign follicular nodule. (C, D) When microfollicular proliferative lesions show a definite fibrous capsule (arrows) in the core needle biopsy, the specimens should be diagnosed as a follicular neoplasm.
Mentions: In CNB and FNAC, the term “follicular neoplasm or suspicious for a follicular neoplasm” is used to encompass neoplastic lesions with follicular proliferative patterns (e.g., follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, follicular variant of papillary carcinoma, follicular variant of medullary carcinoma) [2,3] The histologic diagnosis of “follicular neoplasm or suspicious for a follicular neoplasm” in a CNB specimen is based on the presence of a fibrous capsule and microscopic features that differ from the adjacent thyroid parenchyma (Fig. 4). Follicular cells do not show the typical nuclear features of papillary carcinomas. It is important to identify a well-formed fibrous capsule in the CNB specimen. The FNAC diagnosis for follicular neoplasm is primarily based on the presence of microfollicular or trabecular architecture and the lack of colloid. In a CNB specimen, the growth patterns of a follicular neoplasm can be microfollicular, normofollicular, solid, or trabecular when a fibrous tumor capsule is identified in the sample. Examples in this category include microfollicular proliferative lesions with fibrous capsules, mixed microfollicular and normofollicular proliferative lesions with fibrous capsules, solid or trabecular follicular lesions with fibrous capsules, Hürthle cell proliferative lesions with fibrous capsules, and follicular neoplasms or samples suspicious for follicular neoplasms with focal nuclear atypia.

Bottom Line: However, there is no consensus on the pathology reporting system for thyroid CNB.The Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Group held a conference on thyroid CNB pathology and developed guidelines through contributions from the participants.This article discusses the outcome of the discussions that led to a consensus on the pathology reporting of thyroid CNB.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Hospital Pathology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
In recent years throughout Korea, the use of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) has become common for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid nodules. However, there is no consensus on the pathology reporting system for thyroid CNB. The Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Group held a conference on thyroid CNB pathology and developed guidelines through contributions from the participants. This article discusses the outcome of the discussions that led to a consensus on the pathology reporting of thyroid CNB.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus