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A Review of Inflammatory Processes of the Breast with a Focus on Diagnosis in Core Biopsy Samples.

D'Alfonso TM, Ginter PS, Shin SJ - J Pathol Transl Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Inflammatory and reactive lesions of the breast are relatively uncommon among benign breast lesions and can be the source of an abnormality on imaging.Furthermore, some inflammatory processes can mimic carcinoma or other malignancy microscopically, and vice versa.These include fat necrosis, mammary duct ectasia, granulomatous lobular mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, and abscess.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Inflammatory and reactive lesions of the breast are relatively uncommon among benign breast lesions and can be the source of an abnormality on imaging. Such lesions can simulate a malignant process, based on both clinical and radiographic findings, and core biopsy is often performed to rule out malignancy. Furthermore, some inflammatory processes can mimic carcinoma or other malignancy microscopically, and vice versa. Diagnostic difficulty may arise due to the small and fragmented sample of a core biopsy. This review will focus on the pertinent clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features of the more commonly encountered inflammatory lesions of the breast that can be characterized in a core biopsy sample. These include fat necrosis, mammary duct ectasia, granulomatous lobular mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, and abscess. The microscopic differential diagnoses for these lesions when seen in a core biopsy sample will be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mammographic and microscopic features of fat necrosis in core biopsy samples. (A) Mammography shows a calcified lipid cyst, a characteristic feature of fat necrosis. (B) Core biopsy shows foamy histiocytes in adipose tissue. (C) Chronic inflammation is present and histiocyte-lined cysts are evident (right). (D) Necrotic adipocytes, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis are seen. (E, F) Fat necrosis is seen in stereotactic core biopsies obtained due to calcifications. (E) Calcifications formed within necrotic fat. (F) Calcified fibrous wall of a lipid cyst.
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f1-jptm-49-4-279: Mammographic and microscopic features of fat necrosis in core biopsy samples. (A) Mammography shows a calcified lipid cyst, a characteristic feature of fat necrosis. (B) Core biopsy shows foamy histiocytes in adipose tissue. (C) Chronic inflammation is present and histiocyte-lined cysts are evident (right). (D) Necrotic adipocytes, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis are seen. (E, F) Fat necrosis is seen in stereotactic core biopsies obtained due to calcifications. (E) Calcifications formed within necrotic fat. (F) Calcified fibrous wall of a lipid cyst.

Mentions: On mammography, oil or lipid cysts, which are often calcified, are characteristic of fat necrosis (Fig. 1A). Calcifications in fat necrosis may be clustered, pleomorphic, and linear, simulating ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) [6,7]. Fat necrosis can also appear as a stellate mass with irregular margins on mammography and ultrasound [8-10].


A Review of Inflammatory Processes of the Breast with a Focus on Diagnosis in Core Biopsy Samples.

D'Alfonso TM, Ginter PS, Shin SJ - J Pathol Transl Med (2015)

Mammographic and microscopic features of fat necrosis in core biopsy samples. (A) Mammography shows a calcified lipid cyst, a characteristic feature of fat necrosis. (B) Core biopsy shows foamy histiocytes in adipose tissue. (C) Chronic inflammation is present and histiocyte-lined cysts are evident (right). (D) Necrotic adipocytes, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis are seen. (E, F) Fat necrosis is seen in stereotactic core biopsies obtained due to calcifications. (E) Calcifications formed within necrotic fat. (F) Calcified fibrous wall of a lipid cyst.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508565&req=5

f1-jptm-49-4-279: Mammographic and microscopic features of fat necrosis in core biopsy samples. (A) Mammography shows a calcified lipid cyst, a characteristic feature of fat necrosis. (B) Core biopsy shows foamy histiocytes in adipose tissue. (C) Chronic inflammation is present and histiocyte-lined cysts are evident (right). (D) Necrotic adipocytes, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis are seen. (E, F) Fat necrosis is seen in stereotactic core biopsies obtained due to calcifications. (E) Calcifications formed within necrotic fat. (F) Calcified fibrous wall of a lipid cyst.
Mentions: On mammography, oil or lipid cysts, which are often calcified, are characteristic of fat necrosis (Fig. 1A). Calcifications in fat necrosis may be clustered, pleomorphic, and linear, simulating ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) [6,7]. Fat necrosis can also appear as a stellate mass with irregular margins on mammography and ultrasound [8-10].

Bottom Line: Inflammatory and reactive lesions of the breast are relatively uncommon among benign breast lesions and can be the source of an abnormality on imaging.Furthermore, some inflammatory processes can mimic carcinoma or other malignancy microscopically, and vice versa.These include fat necrosis, mammary duct ectasia, granulomatous lobular mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, and abscess.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Inflammatory and reactive lesions of the breast are relatively uncommon among benign breast lesions and can be the source of an abnormality on imaging. Such lesions can simulate a malignant process, based on both clinical and radiographic findings, and core biopsy is often performed to rule out malignancy. Furthermore, some inflammatory processes can mimic carcinoma or other malignancy microscopically, and vice versa. Diagnostic difficulty may arise due to the small and fragmented sample of a core biopsy. This review will focus on the pertinent clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features of the more commonly encountered inflammatory lesions of the breast that can be characterized in a core biopsy sample. These include fat necrosis, mammary duct ectasia, granulomatous lobular mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, and abscess. The microscopic differential diagnoses for these lesions when seen in a core biopsy sample will be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus