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An Analog of electrically induced transparency via surface delocalized modes.

Xiao X, Zhou B, Wang X, He J, Hou B, Zhang Y, Wen W - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally an interesting opaque state, which is based on an analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in mechanism, in a metal hole array of the dimer lattice.By introducing a small difference to the dimer holes of each unit cell, the surface delocalized modes launching out from the dimer holes can have destructive interferences.This surface-mode-induced opacity (SMIO) state is very sensitive to the difference of the dimer holes, which will promise various applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally an interesting opaque state, which is based on an analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in mechanism, in a metal hole array of the dimer lattice. By introducing a small difference to the dimer holes of each unit cell, the surface delocalized modes launching out from the dimer holes can have destructive interferences. Consequently, a narrow opaque window in the transparent background can be observed in the transmission spectrum. This surface-mode-induced opacity (SMIO) state is very sensitive to the difference of the dimer holes, which will promise various applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Upper panel: the distribution of surface modes (z-component of electric field) in a unit cell; the black dash boxes show the positions of the two dimer holes. Lower panel: the distribution of the surface modes along the white dash line highlighted in the upper panel. The blue dash-dot curve shows the distribution of the surface modes launched from the hole 1, the red dash line presents the surface modes launched from hole 2, and the black solid curve is the interference results of the surface modes from hole 1 and hole 2. Clear interference can be seen.
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f3: Upper panel: the distribution of surface modes (z-component of electric field) in a unit cell; the black dash boxes show the positions of the two dimer holes. Lower panel: the distribution of the surface modes along the white dash line highlighted in the upper panel. The blue dash-dot curve shows the distribution of the surface modes launched from the hole 1, the red dash line presents the surface modes launched from hole 2, and the black solid curve is the interference results of the surface modes from hole 1 and hole 2. Clear interference can be seen.

Mentions: To confirm the above understanding, we calculate the tangential electric field (parallel to the metal surface) on the metal surface at the two transmission peaks and the opaque state. As one expected, at the lower transmission peak great field enhancement is observed around the ε1 = 1.21 holes (Fig. 2(a)), while the field enhancement is found around the ε2 = 1 holes at the higher transmission peak (Fig. 2(b)). At the opaque state, we find that both the dimer holes are at resonant (Fig. 2(c)). For a comparison, we also calculate the tangential electric field on the metal surface at the transmission peak of a MHA of identical dimer holes (ε1 = ε2 = 1) and show it in Fig. 2(d). By comparing Fig. 2 (c),(d), we find that the opposite phases at the two holes are crucial for the formation of the opaque state. To further explore the properties at the opaque state, we calculate the z-component (perpendicular to the metal surface) electric field on the metal surface. From the distribution of the z-component electric field in Fig. 3, we observe a clear interference pattern of the delocalized surface modes launched from the neighbored holes. These results clearly indicate that the opaque state is caused by the destructive interference of the delocalized surface modes.


An Analog of electrically induced transparency via surface delocalized modes.

Xiao X, Zhou B, Wang X, He J, Hou B, Zhang Y, Wen W - Sci Rep (2015)

Upper panel: the distribution of surface modes (z-component of electric field) in a unit cell; the black dash boxes show the positions of the two dimer holes. Lower panel: the distribution of the surface modes along the white dash line highlighted in the upper panel. The blue dash-dot curve shows the distribution of the surface modes launched from the hole 1, the red dash line presents the surface modes launched from hole 2, and the black solid curve is the interference results of the surface modes from hole 1 and hole 2. Clear interference can be seen.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508561&req=5

f3: Upper panel: the distribution of surface modes (z-component of electric field) in a unit cell; the black dash boxes show the positions of the two dimer holes. Lower panel: the distribution of the surface modes along the white dash line highlighted in the upper panel. The blue dash-dot curve shows the distribution of the surface modes launched from the hole 1, the red dash line presents the surface modes launched from hole 2, and the black solid curve is the interference results of the surface modes from hole 1 and hole 2. Clear interference can be seen.
Mentions: To confirm the above understanding, we calculate the tangential electric field (parallel to the metal surface) on the metal surface at the two transmission peaks and the opaque state. As one expected, at the lower transmission peak great field enhancement is observed around the ε1 = 1.21 holes (Fig. 2(a)), while the field enhancement is found around the ε2 = 1 holes at the higher transmission peak (Fig. 2(b)). At the opaque state, we find that both the dimer holes are at resonant (Fig. 2(c)). For a comparison, we also calculate the tangential electric field on the metal surface at the transmission peak of a MHA of identical dimer holes (ε1 = ε2 = 1) and show it in Fig. 2(d). By comparing Fig. 2 (c),(d), we find that the opposite phases at the two holes are crucial for the formation of the opaque state. To further explore the properties at the opaque state, we calculate the z-component (perpendicular to the metal surface) electric field on the metal surface. From the distribution of the z-component electric field in Fig. 3, we observe a clear interference pattern of the delocalized surface modes launched from the neighbored holes. These results clearly indicate that the opaque state is caused by the destructive interference of the delocalized surface modes.

Bottom Line: We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally an interesting opaque state, which is based on an analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in mechanism, in a metal hole array of the dimer lattice.By introducing a small difference to the dimer holes of each unit cell, the surface delocalized modes launching out from the dimer holes can have destructive interferences.This surface-mode-induced opacity (SMIO) state is very sensitive to the difference of the dimer holes, which will promise various applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally an interesting opaque state, which is based on an analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in mechanism, in a metal hole array of the dimer lattice. By introducing a small difference to the dimer holes of each unit cell, the surface delocalized modes launching out from the dimer holes can have destructive interferences. Consequently, a narrow opaque window in the transparent background can be observed in the transmission spectrum. This surface-mode-induced opacity (SMIO) state is very sensitive to the difference of the dimer holes, which will promise various applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus