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Meniscal Root Tear Repair: Why, When and How?

Bonasia DE, Pellegrino P, D'Amelio A, Cottino U, Rossi R - Orthop Rev (Pavia) (2015)

Bottom Line: Although the treatment of meniscal root tears is still controversial, many different techniques have been described for root repair.The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding meniscal root tears, including anatomy, biomechanics and imaging.In addition, the most common surgical techniques, together with the clinical outcomes, are described.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, CTO Hospital, University of Turin , Italy.

ABSTRACT
The integrity of the meniscal root insertions is fundamental to preserve correct knee kinematics and avoid degenerative changes of the knee. Injuries to the meniscal attachments can lead to meniscal extrusion, decreased contact surface, increased cartilage stress, and ultimately articular degeneration. Recent and well designed studies have clarified the anatomy and biomechanics of the medial and lateral meniscal roots. Although the treatment of meniscal root tears is still controversial, many different techniques have been described for root repair. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding meniscal root tears, including anatomy, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common surgical techniques, together with the clinical outcomes, are described.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A) Sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cut of a knee showing the ghost sign at the level of the medial meniscus posterior horn (black arrow). B) Coronal MRI of a left knee showing lateral meniscus extrusion (black arrow) and tricompartmental knee degeneration.
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fig002: A) Sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cut of a knee showing the ghost sign at the level of the medial meniscus posterior horn (black arrow). B) Coronal MRI of a left knee showing lateral meniscus extrusion (black arrow) and tricompartmental knee degeneration.

Mentions: Although the diagnosis of meniscal root tears is challenging despite the use of advanced imaging techniques, MRI is considered the gold standard in diagnosing these lesions.35 Combined ACL tears do not seem to affect the diagnostic accuracy of MRI for meniscal root avulsions.30 Controversies still exist regarding the most reliable MRI technique and image cut for detecting meniscal root tears.4 Fat-suppressed volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (FS 3D VISTA) with Reader Defined Axial reconstruction has recently been described as a powerful tool in detecting radial and root tears of the menisci.36 Traditionally, 2 MRI signs have been described as pathognomonic of meniscal root tears and these are: the ghost sign and meniscal extrusion (Figure 2). The ghost sign (Figure 2A) is characterized by the absence of the posterior horn of the meniscus in sagittal cuts.4,37


Meniscal Root Tear Repair: Why, When and How?

Bonasia DE, Pellegrino P, D'Amelio A, Cottino U, Rossi R - Orthop Rev (Pavia) (2015)

A) Sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cut of a knee showing the ghost sign at the level of the medial meniscus posterior horn (black arrow). B) Coronal MRI of a left knee showing lateral meniscus extrusion (black arrow) and tricompartmental knee degeneration.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508558&req=5

fig002: A) Sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cut of a knee showing the ghost sign at the level of the medial meniscus posterior horn (black arrow). B) Coronal MRI of a left knee showing lateral meniscus extrusion (black arrow) and tricompartmental knee degeneration.
Mentions: Although the diagnosis of meniscal root tears is challenging despite the use of advanced imaging techniques, MRI is considered the gold standard in diagnosing these lesions.35 Combined ACL tears do not seem to affect the diagnostic accuracy of MRI for meniscal root avulsions.30 Controversies still exist regarding the most reliable MRI technique and image cut for detecting meniscal root tears.4 Fat-suppressed volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (FS 3D VISTA) with Reader Defined Axial reconstruction has recently been described as a powerful tool in detecting radial and root tears of the menisci.36 Traditionally, 2 MRI signs have been described as pathognomonic of meniscal root tears and these are: the ghost sign and meniscal extrusion (Figure 2). The ghost sign (Figure 2A) is characterized by the absence of the posterior horn of the meniscus in sagittal cuts.4,37

Bottom Line: Although the treatment of meniscal root tears is still controversial, many different techniques have been described for root repair.The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding meniscal root tears, including anatomy, biomechanics and imaging.In addition, the most common surgical techniques, together with the clinical outcomes, are described.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, CTO Hospital, University of Turin , Italy.

ABSTRACT
The integrity of the meniscal root insertions is fundamental to preserve correct knee kinematics and avoid degenerative changes of the knee. Injuries to the meniscal attachments can lead to meniscal extrusion, decreased contact surface, increased cartilage stress, and ultimately articular degeneration. Recent and well designed studies have clarified the anatomy and biomechanics of the medial and lateral meniscal roots. Although the treatment of meniscal root tears is still controversial, many different techniques have been described for root repair. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding meniscal root tears, including anatomy, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common surgical techniques, together with the clinical outcomes, are described.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus