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Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: Back to the Future in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

Bonasia DE, D'Amelio A, Pellegrino P, Rosso F, Rossi R - Orthop Rev (Pavia) (2015)

Bottom Line: Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction.For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament.The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, CTO Hospital, University of Turin , Italy.

ABSTRACT
Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction. Anatomic single or double bundle ACL reconstruction will improve knee stability, but a small subset of patients may experience some residual anteroposterior and rotational instability. For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common anterolateral reconstruction/tenodesis techniques are described together with their respective clinical outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Imaging. A) Anteroposterior knee radiograph, showing Segond fracture (white circle). B) Coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing sequelae of Segond fracture (white circle). C) Sagittal T1 MRI showing sequelae of Segond fracture (white circle). D) Coronal fat suppression MRI showing anterolateral ligament rupture (black arrows).
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fig002: Imaging. A) Anteroposterior knee radiograph, showing Segond fracture (white circle). B) Coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing sequelae of Segond fracture (white circle). C) Sagittal T1 MRI showing sequelae of Segond fracture (white circle). D) Coronal fat suppression MRI showing anterolateral ligament rupture (black arrows).

Mentions: Anteroposterior, lateral and Merchant X ray views of the knee should be obtained to rule out fractures (including Segond Fracture, tibial eminence avulsions, etc) (Figure 2).


Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee: Back to the Future in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

Bonasia DE, D'Amelio A, Pellegrino P, Rosso F, Rossi R - Orthop Rev (Pavia) (2015)

Imaging. A) Anteroposterior knee radiograph, showing Segond fracture (white circle). B) Coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing sequelae of Segond fracture (white circle). C) Sagittal T1 MRI showing sequelae of Segond fracture (white circle). D) Coronal fat suppression MRI showing anterolateral ligament rupture (black arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508556&req=5

fig002: Imaging. A) Anteroposterior knee radiograph, showing Segond fracture (white circle). B) Coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing sequelae of Segond fracture (white circle). C) Sagittal T1 MRI showing sequelae of Segond fracture (white circle). D) Coronal fat suppression MRI showing anterolateral ligament rupture (black arrows).
Mentions: Anteroposterior, lateral and Merchant X ray views of the knee should be obtained to rule out fractures (including Segond Fracture, tibial eminence avulsions, etc) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction.For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament.The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, CTO Hospital, University of Turin , Italy.

ABSTRACT
Although the importance of the anterolateral stabilizing structures of the knee in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries has been recognized since many years, most of orthopedic surgeons do not take into consideration the anterolateral structures when performing an ACL reconstruction. Anatomic single or double bundle ACL reconstruction will improve knee stability, but a small subset of patients may experience some residual anteroposterior and rotational instability. For this reason, some researchers have turned again towards the anterolateral aspect of the knee and specifically the anterolateral ligament. The goal of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge regarding the anterolateral ligament of the knee, including anatomy, histology, biomechanics and imaging. In addition, the most common anterolateral reconstruction/tenodesis techniques are described together with their respective clinical outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus