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In vivo spectroscopy and NMR metabolite fingerprinting approaches to connect the dynamics of photosynthetic and metabolic phenotypes in resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis during desiccation and recovery.

Mladenov P, Finazzi G, Bligny R, Moyankova D, Zasheva D, Boisson AM, Brugière S, Krasteva V, Alipieva K, Simova S, Tchorbadjieva M, Goltsev V, Ferro M, Rolland N, Djilianov D - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The NMR fingerprint shows the significant metabolic changes in several pathways.We found a decline of valine accompanied by lipid degradation during stress, likely to provide alternative carbon sources for sucrose accumulation at late stages of desiccation.This accumulation, as well as the increased levels of glycerophosphodiesters during drought stress could provide osmoprotection to the cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Abiotic Stress Group, Agrobioinstitute, Agricultural Academy Sofia, Bulgaria.

ABSTRACT
The resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis was used to study dynamics of drought response of photosynthetic machinery parallel with changes in primary metabolism. A relation between leaf water content and photosynthetic performance was established, enabling us to perform a non-destructive evaluation of the plant water status during stress. Spectroscopic analysis of photosynthesis indicated that, at variance with linear electron flow (LEF) involving photosystem (PS) I and II, cyclic electron flow around PSI remains active till almost full dry state at the expense of the LEF, due to the changed protein organization of photosynthetic apparatus. We suggest that, this activity could have a photoprotective role and prevent a complete drop in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), in the absence of LEF, to fuel specific energy-dependent processes necessary for the survival of the plant, during the late states of desiccation. The NMR fingerprint shows the significant metabolic changes in several pathways. Due to the declining of LEF accompanied by biosynthetic reactions during desiccation, a reduction of the ATP pool during drought was observed, which was fully and quickly recovered after plants rehydration. We found a decline of valine accompanied by lipid degradation during stress, likely to provide alternative carbon sources for sucrose accumulation at late stages of desiccation. This accumulation, as well as the increased levels of glycerophosphodiesters during drought stress could provide osmoprotection to the cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Visualization of metabolic changes in of H. rhodopensis during selected states of desiccation and recovery. Values correspond to the averaged meanings of metabolites in the context of sucrose biosynthesis (pink), glycolysis (red), Calvin cycle (light green), pentose phosphate pathway (orange), glycerophospholipid metabolism (yellow), valine and glutamate degradation (dark green), glyoxylate cycle (light blue), and TCA cycle (dark blue) metabolic pathways. Bars from left to right represent the C, D1, D2, D3, R1, and R2 states, respectively, as defined in Figure 1 The colored nodes represent the metabolites changes during drought with Pearson correlation above 0.8. The blue ones represent the metabolites increasing and the red ones represent those with decreasing concentrations. Circled R represents enzymatic reaction.
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Figure 5: Visualization of metabolic changes in of H. rhodopensis during selected states of desiccation and recovery. Values correspond to the averaged meanings of metabolites in the context of sucrose biosynthesis (pink), glycolysis (red), Calvin cycle (light green), pentose phosphate pathway (orange), glycerophospholipid metabolism (yellow), valine and glutamate degradation (dark green), glyoxylate cycle (light blue), and TCA cycle (dark blue) metabolic pathways. Bars from left to right represent the C, D1, D2, D3, R1, and R2 states, respectively, as defined in Figure 1 The colored nodes represent the metabolites changes during drought with Pearson correlation above 0.8. The blue ones represent the metabolites increasing and the red ones represent those with decreasing concentrations. Circled R represents enzymatic reaction.

Mentions: The compounds quantified here fall in several plant metabolic pathways (Figure 5). The accumulation of sucrose until D3 state was accompanied with declining of the levels of UDP-glu in D1 and D2 and an increase in D3 state (Figure 5, pink). The dynamics of F6P and G6P also showed an intensive consumption from D1–D3 stages (Figure 5, red), suggesting the change of direction of glycolysis toward sucrose biosynthesis during these transitions. The slightly increased level of PGA in D3 could be due to the organelle compartmentation of Calvin cycle (Figure 5, green). The increased levels of phosphogluconate (Figure 5, orange), suggest up-regulation of pentose phosphate pathway, which could serve as a supplying unit of erythrose-4-phosphate. Altogether with PEP, they could be used for accumulation of polyphenols through shikimic acid pathway. The observed degradation of PE in H. rhodopensis during drought was accompanied with the increased levels of GPE during the course of drought stress (Figure 5, yellow). We observed same trends for GPC (Figure 5, yellow) suggesting that phosphatidylcholine (PC) could also be subjected to degradation. The levels of choline and ethanolamine increased in D1 and D2 state in relation with the observed degradation of PE and the accumulation of GPE and GPC (Figure 5, yellow). The pronounced degradation of valine (Figure 5, dark green), accompanied by the increase of succinic acid (Figure 5, dark green) and fumaric acid (Figure 5, dark blue) could be related to the supply of carbon sources for gluconeogenesis via succinate and the TCA cycle. The decrease of citric acid (Figure 5, dark blue) could be due to the exchange of tricarbons between the citric acid and cytosol for gluconeogenesis.


In vivo spectroscopy and NMR metabolite fingerprinting approaches to connect the dynamics of photosynthetic and metabolic phenotypes in resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis during desiccation and recovery.

Mladenov P, Finazzi G, Bligny R, Moyankova D, Zasheva D, Boisson AM, Brugière S, Krasteva V, Alipieva K, Simova S, Tchorbadjieva M, Goltsev V, Ferro M, Rolland N, Djilianov D - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Visualization of metabolic changes in of H. rhodopensis during selected states of desiccation and recovery. Values correspond to the averaged meanings of metabolites in the context of sucrose biosynthesis (pink), glycolysis (red), Calvin cycle (light green), pentose phosphate pathway (orange), glycerophospholipid metabolism (yellow), valine and glutamate degradation (dark green), glyoxylate cycle (light blue), and TCA cycle (dark blue) metabolic pathways. Bars from left to right represent the C, D1, D2, D3, R1, and R2 states, respectively, as defined in Figure 1 The colored nodes represent the metabolites changes during drought with Pearson correlation above 0.8. The blue ones represent the metabolites increasing and the red ones represent those with decreasing concentrations. Circled R represents enzymatic reaction.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508511&req=5

Figure 5: Visualization of metabolic changes in of H. rhodopensis during selected states of desiccation and recovery. Values correspond to the averaged meanings of metabolites in the context of sucrose biosynthesis (pink), glycolysis (red), Calvin cycle (light green), pentose phosphate pathway (orange), glycerophospholipid metabolism (yellow), valine and glutamate degradation (dark green), glyoxylate cycle (light blue), and TCA cycle (dark blue) metabolic pathways. Bars from left to right represent the C, D1, D2, D3, R1, and R2 states, respectively, as defined in Figure 1 The colored nodes represent the metabolites changes during drought with Pearson correlation above 0.8. The blue ones represent the metabolites increasing and the red ones represent those with decreasing concentrations. Circled R represents enzymatic reaction.
Mentions: The compounds quantified here fall in several plant metabolic pathways (Figure 5). The accumulation of sucrose until D3 state was accompanied with declining of the levels of UDP-glu in D1 and D2 and an increase in D3 state (Figure 5, pink). The dynamics of F6P and G6P also showed an intensive consumption from D1–D3 stages (Figure 5, red), suggesting the change of direction of glycolysis toward sucrose biosynthesis during these transitions. The slightly increased level of PGA in D3 could be due to the organelle compartmentation of Calvin cycle (Figure 5, green). The increased levels of phosphogluconate (Figure 5, orange), suggest up-regulation of pentose phosphate pathway, which could serve as a supplying unit of erythrose-4-phosphate. Altogether with PEP, they could be used for accumulation of polyphenols through shikimic acid pathway. The observed degradation of PE in H. rhodopensis during drought was accompanied with the increased levels of GPE during the course of drought stress (Figure 5, yellow). We observed same trends for GPC (Figure 5, yellow) suggesting that phosphatidylcholine (PC) could also be subjected to degradation. The levels of choline and ethanolamine increased in D1 and D2 state in relation with the observed degradation of PE and the accumulation of GPE and GPC (Figure 5, yellow). The pronounced degradation of valine (Figure 5, dark green), accompanied by the increase of succinic acid (Figure 5, dark green) and fumaric acid (Figure 5, dark blue) could be related to the supply of carbon sources for gluconeogenesis via succinate and the TCA cycle. The decrease of citric acid (Figure 5, dark blue) could be due to the exchange of tricarbons between the citric acid and cytosol for gluconeogenesis.

Bottom Line: The NMR fingerprint shows the significant metabolic changes in several pathways.We found a decline of valine accompanied by lipid degradation during stress, likely to provide alternative carbon sources for sucrose accumulation at late stages of desiccation.This accumulation, as well as the increased levels of glycerophosphodiesters during drought stress could provide osmoprotection to the cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Abiotic Stress Group, Agrobioinstitute, Agricultural Academy Sofia, Bulgaria.

ABSTRACT
The resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis was used to study dynamics of drought response of photosynthetic machinery parallel with changes in primary metabolism. A relation between leaf water content and photosynthetic performance was established, enabling us to perform a non-destructive evaluation of the plant water status during stress. Spectroscopic analysis of photosynthesis indicated that, at variance with linear electron flow (LEF) involving photosystem (PS) I and II, cyclic electron flow around PSI remains active till almost full dry state at the expense of the LEF, due to the changed protein organization of photosynthetic apparatus. We suggest that, this activity could have a photoprotective role and prevent a complete drop in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), in the absence of LEF, to fuel specific energy-dependent processes necessary for the survival of the plant, during the late states of desiccation. The NMR fingerprint shows the significant metabolic changes in several pathways. Due to the declining of LEF accompanied by biosynthetic reactions during desiccation, a reduction of the ATP pool during drought was observed, which was fully and quickly recovered after plants rehydration. We found a decline of valine accompanied by lipid degradation during stress, likely to provide alternative carbon sources for sucrose accumulation at late stages of desiccation. This accumulation, as well as the increased levels of glycerophosphodiesters during drought stress could provide osmoprotection to the cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus