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In vivo spectroscopy and NMR metabolite fingerprinting approaches to connect the dynamics of photosynthetic and metabolic phenotypes in resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis during desiccation and recovery.

Mladenov P, Finazzi G, Bligny R, Moyankova D, Zasheva D, Boisson AM, Brugière S, Krasteva V, Alipieva K, Simova S, Tchorbadjieva M, Goltsev V, Ferro M, Rolland N, Djilianov D - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The NMR fingerprint shows the significant metabolic changes in several pathways.We found a decline of valine accompanied by lipid degradation during stress, likely to provide alternative carbon sources for sucrose accumulation at late stages of desiccation.This accumulation, as well as the increased levels of glycerophosphodiesters during drought stress could provide osmoprotection to the cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Abiotic Stress Group, Agrobioinstitute, Agricultural Academy Sofia, Bulgaria.

ABSTRACT
The resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis was used to study dynamics of drought response of photosynthetic machinery parallel with changes in primary metabolism. A relation between leaf water content and photosynthetic performance was established, enabling us to perform a non-destructive evaluation of the plant water status during stress. Spectroscopic analysis of photosynthesis indicated that, at variance with linear electron flow (LEF) involving photosystem (PS) I and II, cyclic electron flow around PSI remains active till almost full dry state at the expense of the LEF, due to the changed protein organization of photosynthetic apparatus. We suggest that, this activity could have a photoprotective role and prevent a complete drop in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), in the absence of LEF, to fuel specific energy-dependent processes necessary for the survival of the plant, during the late states of desiccation. The NMR fingerprint shows the significant metabolic changes in several pathways. Due to the declining of LEF accompanied by biosynthetic reactions during desiccation, a reduction of the ATP pool during drought was observed, which was fully and quickly recovered after plants rehydration. We found a decline of valine accompanied by lipid degradation during stress, likely to provide alternative carbon sources for sucrose accumulation at late stages of desiccation. This accumulation, as well as the increased levels of glycerophosphodiesters during drought stress could provide osmoprotection to the cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Evaluation and quantification of plant water status during desiccation and recovery of Haberlea rhodopensis. (A) Drying and recovery of different plants (upper left, Control plants; upper right 120 h of desiccation; lower left, 192 h of desiccation; lower right 36 h of recovery). (B) Box plots of changes in water content during desiccation (blue) and recovery (green). (C) Self organizing map (SOM) visualization of the classified samples according to the four pre-defined neurons for desiccation and recovery. The positions of the scores (leaf samples) derived after Principal Component Analysis (PCA) transformation are clustered in different colors with the neurons according to their weights defined with the two weight vectors, for desiccation (left) and for recovery (right), respectively.
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Figure 1: Evaluation and quantification of plant water status during desiccation and recovery of Haberlea rhodopensis. (A) Drying and recovery of different plants (upper left, Control plants; upper right 120 h of desiccation; lower left, 192 h of desiccation; lower right 36 h of recovery). (B) Box plots of changes in water content during desiccation (blue) and recovery (green). (C) Self organizing map (SOM) visualization of the classified samples according to the four pre-defined neurons for desiccation and recovery. The positions of the scores (leaf samples) derived after Principal Component Analysis (PCA) transformation are clustered in different colors with the neurons according to their weights defined with the two weight vectors, for desiccation (left) and for recovery (right), respectively.

Mentions: In the present study, the leaf water status was evaluated by comparing leaf WC and prompt chlorophyll fluorescence. WC started to decline sharply after 72 h desiccation. On the average, it took about 8 days for the H. rhodopensis plants to reach full desiccation – 16% WC, starting from about 80% WC. After 10 days at fully dried state, irrigation was performed. WC recovered rapidly during the first 6 h upon irrigation, and almost regained the initial values after 48 h (Figure 1B), but the plants needed seven days to fully recover after rewatering (Figure 1A).


In vivo spectroscopy and NMR metabolite fingerprinting approaches to connect the dynamics of photosynthetic and metabolic phenotypes in resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis during desiccation and recovery.

Mladenov P, Finazzi G, Bligny R, Moyankova D, Zasheva D, Boisson AM, Brugière S, Krasteva V, Alipieva K, Simova S, Tchorbadjieva M, Goltsev V, Ferro M, Rolland N, Djilianov D - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Evaluation and quantification of plant water status during desiccation and recovery of Haberlea rhodopensis. (A) Drying and recovery of different plants (upper left, Control plants; upper right 120 h of desiccation; lower left, 192 h of desiccation; lower right 36 h of recovery). (B) Box plots of changes in water content during desiccation (blue) and recovery (green). (C) Self organizing map (SOM) visualization of the classified samples according to the four pre-defined neurons for desiccation and recovery. The positions of the scores (leaf samples) derived after Principal Component Analysis (PCA) transformation are clustered in different colors with the neurons according to their weights defined with the two weight vectors, for desiccation (left) and for recovery (right), respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508511&req=5

Figure 1: Evaluation and quantification of plant water status during desiccation and recovery of Haberlea rhodopensis. (A) Drying and recovery of different plants (upper left, Control plants; upper right 120 h of desiccation; lower left, 192 h of desiccation; lower right 36 h of recovery). (B) Box plots of changes in water content during desiccation (blue) and recovery (green). (C) Self organizing map (SOM) visualization of the classified samples according to the four pre-defined neurons for desiccation and recovery. The positions of the scores (leaf samples) derived after Principal Component Analysis (PCA) transformation are clustered in different colors with the neurons according to their weights defined with the two weight vectors, for desiccation (left) and for recovery (right), respectively.
Mentions: In the present study, the leaf water status was evaluated by comparing leaf WC and prompt chlorophyll fluorescence. WC started to decline sharply after 72 h desiccation. On the average, it took about 8 days for the H. rhodopensis plants to reach full desiccation – 16% WC, starting from about 80% WC. After 10 days at fully dried state, irrigation was performed. WC recovered rapidly during the first 6 h upon irrigation, and almost regained the initial values after 48 h (Figure 1B), but the plants needed seven days to fully recover after rewatering (Figure 1A).

Bottom Line: The NMR fingerprint shows the significant metabolic changes in several pathways.We found a decline of valine accompanied by lipid degradation during stress, likely to provide alternative carbon sources for sucrose accumulation at late stages of desiccation.This accumulation, as well as the increased levels of glycerophosphodiesters during drought stress could provide osmoprotection to the cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Abiotic Stress Group, Agrobioinstitute, Agricultural Academy Sofia, Bulgaria.

ABSTRACT
The resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis was used to study dynamics of drought response of photosynthetic machinery parallel with changes in primary metabolism. A relation between leaf water content and photosynthetic performance was established, enabling us to perform a non-destructive evaluation of the plant water status during stress. Spectroscopic analysis of photosynthesis indicated that, at variance with linear electron flow (LEF) involving photosystem (PS) I and II, cyclic electron flow around PSI remains active till almost full dry state at the expense of the LEF, due to the changed protein organization of photosynthetic apparatus. We suggest that, this activity could have a photoprotective role and prevent a complete drop in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), in the absence of LEF, to fuel specific energy-dependent processes necessary for the survival of the plant, during the late states of desiccation. The NMR fingerprint shows the significant metabolic changes in several pathways. Due to the declining of LEF accompanied by biosynthetic reactions during desiccation, a reduction of the ATP pool during drought was observed, which was fully and quickly recovered after plants rehydration. We found a decline of valine accompanied by lipid degradation during stress, likely to provide alternative carbon sources for sucrose accumulation at late stages of desiccation. This accumulation, as well as the increased levels of glycerophosphodiesters during drought stress could provide osmoprotection to the cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus