Limits...
Modulation of incentivized dishonesty by disgust facial expressions.

Lim J, Ho PM, Mullette-Gillman OA - Front Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Combining these data with those from prior experiments revealed that the effect of disgust presentation on both harm judgments and honesty could be accounted for by the same bidirectional function, with no significant effect of domain.This clearly demonstrates that disgust facial expressions produce the same modulation of moral judgments across different moral foundations (harm and honesty).Our results suggest strong overlap in the cognitive/neural processes of moral judgments across moral foundations, and provide a framework for further studies to specify the integration of emotional information in moral decision making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore ; Singapore Institute for Neurotechnology, National University of Singapore Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
Disgust modulates moral decisions involving harming others. We recently specified that this effect is bi-directionally modulated by individual sensitivity to disgust. Here, we show that this effect generalizes to the moral domain of honesty and extends to outcomes with real-world impact. We employed a dice-rolling task in which participants were incentivized to dishonestly report outcomes to increase their potential final monetary payoff. Disgust or control facial expressions were presented subliminally on each trial. Our results reveal that the disgust facial expressions altered honest reporting as a bi-directional function moderated by individual sensitivity. Combining these data with those from prior experiments revealed that the effect of disgust presentation on both harm judgments and honesty could be accounted for by the same bidirectional function, with no significant effect of domain. This clearly demonstrates that disgust facial expressions produce the same modulation of moral judgments across different moral foundations (harm and honesty). Our results suggest strong overlap in the cognitive/neural processes of moral judgments across moral foundations, and provide a framework for further studies to specify the integration of emotional information in moral decision making.

No MeSH data available.


Common bidirectional function. Data from four independent experimental samples (N = 125), testing the effects of disgust presentation on honesty and judgment of moral dilemmas. Combined, these data obeyed the same bidirectional function, without significant main effect or interaction with task domain.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508507&req=5

Figure 6: Common bidirectional function. Data from four independent experimental samples (N = 125), testing the effects of disgust presentation on honesty and judgment of moral dilemmas. Combined, these data obeyed the same bidirectional function, without significant main effect or interaction with task domain.

Mentions: The above results indicate that the disgust priming effect on judgments of moral dilemmas generalizes to the moral domain of honesty. We next sought to test if all these data obeyed the same bidirectional function. To achieve this, we standardized the behavioral measures across experiments by converting the dependent variable in this study (MVRDR, N = 48), as well as our changes in moral acceptability variables from our previous behavioral studies (N = 54; Ong et al., 2014), and fMRI experiment (N = 19; Lim et al., unpublished), to z-scores. We then correlated this entire set of scores with DS-R. This overall correlation was significant (Figure 6: total N = 121, r = .34, p = 0.0002). Furthermore, One-Way ANCOVA of the z-scored data with DS-R as a covariate revealed a significant effect of priming across the four different datasets [F(1,119) = 13.44, p = 0.0003, η2p = 0.10].


Modulation of incentivized dishonesty by disgust facial expressions.

Lim J, Ho PM, Mullette-Gillman OA - Front Neurosci (2015)

Common bidirectional function. Data from four independent experimental samples (N = 125), testing the effects of disgust presentation on honesty and judgment of moral dilemmas. Combined, these data obeyed the same bidirectional function, without significant main effect or interaction with task domain.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508507&req=5

Figure 6: Common bidirectional function. Data from four independent experimental samples (N = 125), testing the effects of disgust presentation on honesty and judgment of moral dilemmas. Combined, these data obeyed the same bidirectional function, without significant main effect or interaction with task domain.
Mentions: The above results indicate that the disgust priming effect on judgments of moral dilemmas generalizes to the moral domain of honesty. We next sought to test if all these data obeyed the same bidirectional function. To achieve this, we standardized the behavioral measures across experiments by converting the dependent variable in this study (MVRDR, N = 48), as well as our changes in moral acceptability variables from our previous behavioral studies (N = 54; Ong et al., 2014), and fMRI experiment (N = 19; Lim et al., unpublished), to z-scores. We then correlated this entire set of scores with DS-R. This overall correlation was significant (Figure 6: total N = 121, r = .34, p = 0.0002). Furthermore, One-Way ANCOVA of the z-scored data with DS-R as a covariate revealed a significant effect of priming across the four different datasets [F(1,119) = 13.44, p = 0.0003, η2p = 0.10].

Bottom Line: Combining these data with those from prior experiments revealed that the effect of disgust presentation on both harm judgments and honesty could be accounted for by the same bidirectional function, with no significant effect of domain.This clearly demonstrates that disgust facial expressions produce the same modulation of moral judgments across different moral foundations (harm and honesty).Our results suggest strong overlap in the cognitive/neural processes of moral judgments across moral foundations, and provide a framework for further studies to specify the integration of emotional information in moral decision making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore ; Singapore Institute for Neurotechnology, National University of Singapore Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
Disgust modulates moral decisions involving harming others. We recently specified that this effect is bi-directionally modulated by individual sensitivity to disgust. Here, we show that this effect generalizes to the moral domain of honesty and extends to outcomes with real-world impact. We employed a dice-rolling task in which participants were incentivized to dishonestly report outcomes to increase their potential final monetary payoff. Disgust or control facial expressions were presented subliminally on each trial. Our results reveal that the disgust facial expressions altered honest reporting as a bi-directional function moderated by individual sensitivity. Combining these data with those from prior experiments revealed that the effect of disgust presentation on both harm judgments and honesty could be accounted for by the same bidirectional function, with no significant effect of domain. This clearly demonstrates that disgust facial expressions produce the same modulation of moral judgments across different moral foundations (harm and honesty). Our results suggest strong overlap in the cognitive/neural processes of moral judgments across moral foundations, and provide a framework for further studies to specify the integration of emotional information in moral decision making.

No MeSH data available.