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Self-reported sleep duration mitigates the association between inflammation and cognitive functioning in hospitalized older men.

Dzierzewski JM, Song Y, Fung CH, Rodriguez JC, Jouldjian S, Alessi CA, Breen EC, Irwin MR, Martin JL - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Hierarchical regression analyses (controlling for age, education, race, depression, pain, health comorbidity, and BMI) revealed that higher levels of CRP and sICAM are associated with higher global cognitive functioning in older men with sleep duration ≥6 h (β = -0.19, β = -0.18, p's < 0.05, respectively), but not in those with short sleep durations (p's > 0.05).In elderly hospitalized men, sleep duration moderates the association between inflammation and cognitive functioning.These findings have implications for the clinical care of older men within medical settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System Los Angeles, CA, USA ; David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Examination of predictors of late-life cognitive functioning is particularly salient in at-risk older adults, such as those who have been recently hospitalized. Sleep and inflammation are independently related to late-life cognitive functioning. The potential role of sleep as a moderator of the relationship between inflammation and global cognitive functioning has not been adequately addressed. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration, inflammatory markers, and general cognitive functioning in hospitalized older men. Older men (n = 135; Mean age = 72.9 ± 9.7 years) were recruited from inpatient rehabilitation units at a VA Medical Center to participate in a cross-sectional study of sleep. Participants completed the Mini-Mental State Examination and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and underwent an 8 a.m. blood draw to measure inflammatory markers [i.e., C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6)]. Hierarchical regression analyses (controlling for age, education, race, depression, pain, health comorbidity, and BMI) revealed that higher levels of CRP and sICAM are associated with higher global cognitive functioning in older men with sleep duration ≥6 h (β = -0.19, β = -0.18, p's < 0.05, respectively), but not in those with short sleep durations (p's > 0.05). In elderly hospitalized men, sleep duration moderates the association between inflammation and cognitive functioning. These findings have implications for the clinical care of older men within medical settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Interaction between CRP (left panel, mg/L) and sICAM (right panel, ng/mL) and sleep duration. CRP, sICAM, and MMSE variables were transformed using the Blom transformation prior to analyses. All variables were transformed back to their original metric prior to graphing. Values to the left of the vertical bold lines fall within the regions of significance.
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Figure 1: Interaction between CRP (left panel, mg/L) and sICAM (right panel, ng/mL) and sleep duration. CRP, sICAM, and MMSE variables were transformed using the Blom transformation prior to analyses. All variables were transformed back to their original metric prior to graphing. Values to the left of the vertical bold lines fall within the regions of significance.

Mentions: To further explicate the moderating effect in the relationship between inflammation and general cognitive functioning by sleep duration, we graphed the inflammation-global cognitive functioning relationship for older men separately by sleep duration groups (Figure 1; CRP model on the left, sICAM model on the right). As is illustrated, for CRP and sICAM, short sleep duration attenuates the relationship between inflammation and global cognitive functioning. Simple slope analysis revealed that men with short sleep durations (i.e., less than 5 h per night) do not demonstrate a significant relationship between inflammation and global cognitive functioning [t(130) = −0.84, p > 0.05; t(130) = 0.03, p > 0.05, respectively for CRP and sICAM]. However, older men with sleep durations greater than 6 h per night show significant positive relationships between inflammation and global cognitive functioning. The highest levels of global cognitive functioning was seen among older men with higher levels of inflammatory markers who slept more than 7 h per night [t(130) = 2.82, p < 0.01; t(130) = 3.13, p < 0.01, respectively CRP and sICAM]. The region of significance analysis indicated that differences in global cognitive functioning between sleep duration groups occurred below Blom-transformed values of CRP = −0.025 and sICAM = 0.024 (equivalent to 38.9 mg/L and 272 ng/mL, respectively).


Self-reported sleep duration mitigates the association between inflammation and cognitive functioning in hospitalized older men.

Dzierzewski JM, Song Y, Fung CH, Rodriguez JC, Jouldjian S, Alessi CA, Breen EC, Irwin MR, Martin JL - Front Psychol (2015)

Interaction between CRP (left panel, mg/L) and sICAM (right panel, ng/mL) and sleep duration. CRP, sICAM, and MMSE variables were transformed using the Blom transformation prior to analyses. All variables were transformed back to their original metric prior to graphing. Values to the left of the vertical bold lines fall within the regions of significance.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508491&req=5

Figure 1: Interaction between CRP (left panel, mg/L) and sICAM (right panel, ng/mL) and sleep duration. CRP, sICAM, and MMSE variables were transformed using the Blom transformation prior to analyses. All variables were transformed back to their original metric prior to graphing. Values to the left of the vertical bold lines fall within the regions of significance.
Mentions: To further explicate the moderating effect in the relationship between inflammation and general cognitive functioning by sleep duration, we graphed the inflammation-global cognitive functioning relationship for older men separately by sleep duration groups (Figure 1; CRP model on the left, sICAM model on the right). As is illustrated, for CRP and sICAM, short sleep duration attenuates the relationship between inflammation and global cognitive functioning. Simple slope analysis revealed that men with short sleep durations (i.e., less than 5 h per night) do not demonstrate a significant relationship between inflammation and global cognitive functioning [t(130) = −0.84, p > 0.05; t(130) = 0.03, p > 0.05, respectively for CRP and sICAM]. However, older men with sleep durations greater than 6 h per night show significant positive relationships between inflammation and global cognitive functioning. The highest levels of global cognitive functioning was seen among older men with higher levels of inflammatory markers who slept more than 7 h per night [t(130) = 2.82, p < 0.01; t(130) = 3.13, p < 0.01, respectively CRP and sICAM]. The region of significance analysis indicated that differences in global cognitive functioning between sleep duration groups occurred below Blom-transformed values of CRP = −0.025 and sICAM = 0.024 (equivalent to 38.9 mg/L and 272 ng/mL, respectively).

Bottom Line: Hierarchical regression analyses (controlling for age, education, race, depression, pain, health comorbidity, and BMI) revealed that higher levels of CRP and sICAM are associated with higher global cognitive functioning in older men with sleep duration ≥6 h (β = -0.19, β = -0.18, p's < 0.05, respectively), but not in those with short sleep durations (p's > 0.05).In elderly hospitalized men, sleep duration moderates the association between inflammation and cognitive functioning.These findings have implications for the clinical care of older men within medical settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System Los Angeles, CA, USA ; David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Examination of predictors of late-life cognitive functioning is particularly salient in at-risk older adults, such as those who have been recently hospitalized. Sleep and inflammation are independently related to late-life cognitive functioning. The potential role of sleep as a moderator of the relationship between inflammation and global cognitive functioning has not been adequately addressed. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration, inflammatory markers, and general cognitive functioning in hospitalized older men. Older men (n = 135; Mean age = 72.9 ± 9.7 years) were recruited from inpatient rehabilitation units at a VA Medical Center to participate in a cross-sectional study of sleep. Participants completed the Mini-Mental State Examination and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and underwent an 8 a.m. blood draw to measure inflammatory markers [i.e., C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6)]. Hierarchical regression analyses (controlling for age, education, race, depression, pain, health comorbidity, and BMI) revealed that higher levels of CRP and sICAM are associated with higher global cognitive functioning in older men with sleep duration ≥6 h (β = -0.19, β = -0.18, p's < 0.05, respectively), but not in those with short sleep durations (p's > 0.05). In elderly hospitalized men, sleep duration moderates the association between inflammation and cognitive functioning. These findings have implications for the clinical care of older men within medical settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus