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Longer prime presentation decreases picture-word cross-domain priming.

Miyoshi K, Kimura Y, Ashida H - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: We did not observe a significant decrease in priming in Experiment 1.The results suggest that the longer presentation of pictures causes a non-perceptual adaptation effect.This effect may occur at conceptual, linguistic, and/or response-related levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Psychology, Department of Letters, Kyoto University , Kyoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT
A short prime presentation has been shown to provide a greater priming magnitude, whereas a longer prime presentation results in a lower priming magnitude. In Experiment 1, we attempted to replicate the decrease of priming using word stimuli. Words were presented in both prime and test sessions, and participants judged whether each stimulus was natural or manmade. In Experiment 2, we employed a cross-domain priming paradigm to assess the impact of prime duration on non-perceptual processes. Pictures were presented in prime sessions, and their semantically matched words were presented in test sessions. We did not observe a significant decrease in priming in Experiment 1. However, we found that 2000 ms of prime exposure led to weaker cross-domain priming when compared with 250 ms of the exposure in Experiment 2. The results suggest that the longer presentation of pictures causes a non-perceptual adaptation effect. This effect may occur at conceptual, linguistic, and/or response-related levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean reaction time in each condition. Error bars indicate the 95% within-participant confidence interval (Baguley, 2012). ***p < 0.001, *p < 0.05.
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Figure 1: Mean reaction time in each condition. Error bars indicate the 95% within-participant confidence interval (Baguley, 2012). ***p < 0.001, *p < 0.05.

Mentions: Table 1 presents mean response accuracies recorded in the test sessions. RT analyses included only trials with correct responses. We conducted a repeated-measures ANOVA on the mean RTs with experiment (Experiments 1 and 2) and prime condition (novel, 250 ms, and 2000 ms) as within-participant factors (Figure 1). There was no significant main effect of experiment [F(1,15) = 1.98, p = 0.18, = 0.117], but there was a significant main effect of prime condition [F(2,30) = 27.70, p < 0.001, = 0.649]. The interaction between these two factors was significant [F(2,30) = 5.13, p = 0.01, = 0.255].


Longer prime presentation decreases picture-word cross-domain priming.

Miyoshi K, Kimura Y, Ashida H - Front Psychol (2015)

Mean reaction time in each condition. Error bars indicate the 95% within-participant confidence interval (Baguley, 2012). ***p < 0.001, *p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508485&req=5

Figure 1: Mean reaction time in each condition. Error bars indicate the 95% within-participant confidence interval (Baguley, 2012). ***p < 0.001, *p < 0.05.
Mentions: Table 1 presents mean response accuracies recorded in the test sessions. RT analyses included only trials with correct responses. We conducted a repeated-measures ANOVA on the mean RTs with experiment (Experiments 1 and 2) and prime condition (novel, 250 ms, and 2000 ms) as within-participant factors (Figure 1). There was no significant main effect of experiment [F(1,15) = 1.98, p = 0.18, = 0.117], but there was a significant main effect of prime condition [F(2,30) = 27.70, p < 0.001, = 0.649]. The interaction between these two factors was significant [F(2,30) = 5.13, p = 0.01, = 0.255].

Bottom Line: We did not observe a significant decrease in priming in Experiment 1.The results suggest that the longer presentation of pictures causes a non-perceptual adaptation effect.This effect may occur at conceptual, linguistic, and/or response-related levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Psychology, Department of Letters, Kyoto University , Kyoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT
A short prime presentation has been shown to provide a greater priming magnitude, whereas a longer prime presentation results in a lower priming magnitude. In Experiment 1, we attempted to replicate the decrease of priming using word stimuli. Words were presented in both prime and test sessions, and participants judged whether each stimulus was natural or manmade. In Experiment 2, we employed a cross-domain priming paradigm to assess the impact of prime duration on non-perceptual processes. Pictures were presented in prime sessions, and their semantically matched words were presented in test sessions. We did not observe a significant decrease in priming in Experiment 1. However, we found that 2000 ms of prime exposure led to weaker cross-domain priming when compared with 250 ms of the exposure in Experiment 2. The results suggest that the longer presentation of pictures causes a non-perceptual adaptation effect. This effect may occur at conceptual, linguistic, and/or response-related levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus