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Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold.

Santoro A, Nori SL, Lorusso L, Secondulfo C, Monda M, Viggiano A - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck.Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment.This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Salerno, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the "fingers point" of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold.

No MeSH data available.


Location of Vaccaria seed on the surface of subject's earlobe (a). Somatotopic map of the ear showing the correspondence of fingers and fingertips with the stimulated acupoint (b).
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fig2: Location of Vaccaria seed on the surface of subject's earlobe (a). Somatotopic map of the ear showing the correspondence of fingers and fingertips with the stimulated acupoint (b).

Mentions: The first day, from 14:00 to 19:00, each one of the participants underwent an autoalgometric examination, before any treatment. After this first examination, a seed of Vaccaria was applied on the top of the scaphoid fossa of one earlobe in the region corresponding to the finger-tips and finger-backs in Nogier's somatotopic map (Figure 2; treated group) or on the neck (control group). Vaccaria seed was applied by Dr. Nori, a qualified and trained physician [16, 32]. The acupoint was selected by searching the point most sensitive to a probe (tip tweezers) and tender to palpation. A gentle pressure with the thumb was applied to this seed, making a circular anticlockwise movement for two minutes with no further manipulation by the subject [40]. A second autoalgometric examination was then done after one hour, and a third examination was done after 24 hours by the application of the seed.


Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold.

Santoro A, Nori SL, Lorusso L, Secondulfo C, Monda M, Viggiano A - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Location of Vaccaria seed on the surface of subject's earlobe (a). Somatotopic map of the ear showing the correspondence of fingers and fingertips with the stimulated acupoint (b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508478&req=5

fig2: Location of Vaccaria seed on the surface of subject's earlobe (a). Somatotopic map of the ear showing the correspondence of fingers and fingertips with the stimulated acupoint (b).
Mentions: The first day, from 14:00 to 19:00, each one of the participants underwent an autoalgometric examination, before any treatment. After this first examination, a seed of Vaccaria was applied on the top of the scaphoid fossa of one earlobe in the region corresponding to the finger-tips and finger-backs in Nogier's somatotopic map (Figure 2; treated group) or on the neck (control group). Vaccaria seed was applied by Dr. Nori, a qualified and trained physician [16, 32]. The acupoint was selected by searching the point most sensitive to a probe (tip tweezers) and tender to palpation. A gentle pressure with the thumb was applied to this seed, making a circular anticlockwise movement for two minutes with no further manipulation by the subject [40]. A second autoalgometric examination was then done after one hour, and a third examination was done after 24 hours by the application of the seed.

Bottom Line: Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck.Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment.This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Salerno, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the "fingers point" of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold.

No MeSH data available.