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Immunohistochemical Expression of Collagens in the Skin of Horses Treated with Leukocyte-Poor Platelet-Rich Plasma.

de Souza MV, Silva MB, Pinto Jde O, Lima MB, Crepaldi J, Lopes GF, dos Santos HB, Ribeiro RI, Thomé RG - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The normal skin (T0) showed strong staining for type III and I collagen in papillary and reticular dermis, respectively.The administration of a single dose of LP-PRP 12 h after induction of wound in horses does not influence formation of collagens I and III.However, the intense labeling for COL III suggests that the tissue was still weak during the macroscopic closure of the wound, demonstrating that healing was not completely finished.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Campus Universitário, Avenida P.H. Rolfs, s/n, 36570-900 Viçosa, MG, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
This study evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of type I (COL I) and III (COL III) collagens during the healing process of skin treated with leukocyte-poor platelet-rich plasma (LP-PRP). Seven healthy gelding crossbred horses aged 16 to 17 years were used. Two rectangle-shaped wounds were created surgically in the right and left gluteal regions. Twelve hours after wound induction, 0.5 mL of the LP-PRP was administered in each edge of the wounds of one of the gluteal regions. The contralateral region was used as control (CG). Three samples were obtained: after wound induction (T0), 14 days (T1) of healing process, and after complete closure of the skin (T2). The normal skin (T0) showed strong staining for type III and I collagen in papillary and reticular dermis, respectively. In the scar of the treated group, COL III showed important (p < 0.05) increase in immunoreaction in T2 compared with T1. The administration of a single dose of LP-PRP 12 h after induction of wound in horses does not influence formation of collagens I and III. However, the intense labeling for COL III suggests that the tissue was still weak during the macroscopic closure of the wound, demonstrating that healing was not completely finished.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Immunohistochemistry for type I collagen in the skin of horses treated or untreated with LP-PRP. Immunostaining was visible in the reticular dermis at all times and in all groups: normal skin (a), border tissue and scar area (b). Image obtained at 14 and 37 days of skin healing process from treated wounds (c and e, resp.) and controls (d and f, resp.). Stratified squamous epithelial tissue (Ep), papillary dermis (PD), reticular dermis (RD), immunostaining (arrowhead), hair follicle (arrows), scar edge skin (NS), and scar area (Wd). Bars = 50 μm.
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fig4: Immunohistochemistry for type I collagen in the skin of horses treated or untreated with LP-PRP. Immunostaining was visible in the reticular dermis at all times and in all groups: normal skin (a), border tissue and scar area (b). Image obtained at 14 and 37 days of skin healing process from treated wounds (c and e, resp.) and controls (d and f, resp.). Stratified squamous epithelial tissue (Ep), papillary dermis (PD), reticular dermis (RD), immunostaining (arrowhead), hair follicle (arrows), scar edge skin (NS), and scar area (Wd). Bars = 50 μm.

Mentions: Figures 3 and 4 show images obtained from the samples evaluated by immunohistochemistry. For COL III, staining in healthy skin (T0) showed reticular fibers located in the papillary dermis (Figure 3(a)). In contrast, for COL I, staining was evident in the reticular dermis (Figure 4(a)). The tissue of the edge of the scar had the same staining pattern as T0 in the papillary and reticular layers, with intense staining for COL III (Figure 3(b)) and I (Figure 4(b)), respectively. As previously mentioned, the immunostained area for COL III (Figures 3(c)–3(f)) and COL I (Figures 4(c)–4(f)) was evaluated in the healing area where the newly formed skin had thick stratified epithelium and dermis without annexes for the different wound-healing periods.


Immunohistochemical Expression of Collagens in the Skin of Horses Treated with Leukocyte-Poor Platelet-Rich Plasma.

de Souza MV, Silva MB, Pinto Jde O, Lima MB, Crepaldi J, Lopes GF, dos Santos HB, Ribeiro RI, Thomé RG - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Immunohistochemistry for type I collagen in the skin of horses treated or untreated with LP-PRP. Immunostaining was visible in the reticular dermis at all times and in all groups: normal skin (a), border tissue and scar area (b). Image obtained at 14 and 37 days of skin healing process from treated wounds (c and e, resp.) and controls (d and f, resp.). Stratified squamous epithelial tissue (Ep), papillary dermis (PD), reticular dermis (RD), immunostaining (arrowhead), hair follicle (arrows), scar edge skin (NS), and scar area (Wd). Bars = 50 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508476&req=5

fig4: Immunohistochemistry for type I collagen in the skin of horses treated or untreated with LP-PRP. Immunostaining was visible in the reticular dermis at all times and in all groups: normal skin (a), border tissue and scar area (b). Image obtained at 14 and 37 days of skin healing process from treated wounds (c and e, resp.) and controls (d and f, resp.). Stratified squamous epithelial tissue (Ep), papillary dermis (PD), reticular dermis (RD), immunostaining (arrowhead), hair follicle (arrows), scar edge skin (NS), and scar area (Wd). Bars = 50 μm.
Mentions: Figures 3 and 4 show images obtained from the samples evaluated by immunohistochemistry. For COL III, staining in healthy skin (T0) showed reticular fibers located in the papillary dermis (Figure 3(a)). In contrast, for COL I, staining was evident in the reticular dermis (Figure 4(a)). The tissue of the edge of the scar had the same staining pattern as T0 in the papillary and reticular layers, with intense staining for COL III (Figure 3(b)) and I (Figure 4(b)), respectively. As previously mentioned, the immunostained area for COL III (Figures 3(c)–3(f)) and COL I (Figures 4(c)–4(f)) was evaluated in the healing area where the newly formed skin had thick stratified epithelium and dermis without annexes for the different wound-healing periods.

Bottom Line: The normal skin (T0) showed strong staining for type III and I collagen in papillary and reticular dermis, respectively.The administration of a single dose of LP-PRP 12 h after induction of wound in horses does not influence formation of collagens I and III.However, the intense labeling for COL III suggests that the tissue was still weak during the macroscopic closure of the wound, demonstrating that healing was not completely finished.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Campus Universitário, Avenida P.H. Rolfs, s/n, 36570-900 Viçosa, MG, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
This study evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of type I (COL I) and III (COL III) collagens during the healing process of skin treated with leukocyte-poor platelet-rich plasma (LP-PRP). Seven healthy gelding crossbred horses aged 16 to 17 years were used. Two rectangle-shaped wounds were created surgically in the right and left gluteal regions. Twelve hours after wound induction, 0.5 mL of the LP-PRP was administered in each edge of the wounds of one of the gluteal regions. The contralateral region was used as control (CG). Three samples were obtained: after wound induction (T0), 14 days (T1) of healing process, and after complete closure of the skin (T2). The normal skin (T0) showed strong staining for type III and I collagen in papillary and reticular dermis, respectively. In the scar of the treated group, COL III showed important (p < 0.05) increase in immunoreaction in T2 compared with T1. The administration of a single dose of LP-PRP 12 h after induction of wound in horses does not influence formation of collagens I and III. However, the intense labeling for COL III suggests that the tissue was still weak during the macroscopic closure of the wound, demonstrating that healing was not completely finished.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus