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Psychological Benefits of Nonpharmacological Methods Aimed for Improving Balance in Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review.

Šumec R, Filip P, Sheardová K, Bareš M - Behav Neurol (2015)

Bottom Line: This review is an analysis of nonpharmacological methods shown to be effective and successful for improving balance in patients suffering from PD.Beside this physical outcome, many methods have also shown effect on quality of life, depression level, enjoyment, and motivation to continue in practicing the method independently.The purpose of this review is to provide information about practical and creative methods designed to improve balance in PD and highlight their positive impact on patient's psychology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Clinical Research Center (ICRC), St. Anne's University Hospital, Pekařská 53, 656 91 Brno, Czech Republic ; First Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, St. Anne's University Hospital, Pekařská 53, 656 91 Brno, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a serious condition with a major negative impact on patient's physical and mental health. Postural instability is one of the cardinal difficulties reported by patients to deal with. Neuroanatomical, animal, and clinical studies on nonparkinsonian and parkinsonian subjects suggest an important correlation between the presence of balance dysfunction and multiple mood disorders, such as anxiety, depression, and apathy. Considering that balance dysfunction is a very common symptom in PD, we can presume that by its management we could positively influence patient's state of mind too. This review is an analysis of nonpharmacological methods shown to be effective and successful for improving balance in patients suffering from PD. Strategies such as general exercise, robotic assisted training, Tai Chi, Qi Gong, Yoga, dance (such as tango or ballet), box, virtual reality-based, or neurofeedback-based techniques and so forth can significantly improve the stability in these patients. Beside this physical outcome, many methods have also shown effect on quality of life, depression level, enjoyment, and motivation to continue in practicing the method independently. The purpose of this review is to provide information about practical and creative methods designed to improve balance in PD and highlight their positive impact on patient's psychology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Neural balance-anxiety links.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Neural balance-anxiety links.

Mentions: Anxiety and balance share some common neural circuits [95, 96] (see Figure 1). Central circuits that process afferent visceral and vestibular information related to balance control include vestibular nuclei, nucleus tractus solitarii, thalamus, and vestibular cortex. These pathways connect to parabrachial nucleus network, which is involved in generating emotional and physiological manifestations of anxiety and fear [97].


Psychological Benefits of Nonpharmacological Methods Aimed for Improving Balance in Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review.

Šumec R, Filip P, Sheardová K, Bareš M - Behav Neurol (2015)

Neural balance-anxiety links.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508472&req=5

fig1: Neural balance-anxiety links.
Mentions: Anxiety and balance share some common neural circuits [95, 96] (see Figure 1). Central circuits that process afferent visceral and vestibular information related to balance control include vestibular nuclei, nucleus tractus solitarii, thalamus, and vestibular cortex. These pathways connect to parabrachial nucleus network, which is involved in generating emotional and physiological manifestations of anxiety and fear [97].

Bottom Line: This review is an analysis of nonpharmacological methods shown to be effective and successful for improving balance in patients suffering from PD.Beside this physical outcome, many methods have also shown effect on quality of life, depression level, enjoyment, and motivation to continue in practicing the method independently.The purpose of this review is to provide information about practical and creative methods designed to improve balance in PD and highlight their positive impact on patient's psychology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Clinical Research Center (ICRC), St. Anne's University Hospital, Pekařská 53, 656 91 Brno, Czech Republic ; First Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, St. Anne's University Hospital, Pekařská 53, 656 91 Brno, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a serious condition with a major negative impact on patient's physical and mental health. Postural instability is one of the cardinal difficulties reported by patients to deal with. Neuroanatomical, animal, and clinical studies on nonparkinsonian and parkinsonian subjects suggest an important correlation between the presence of balance dysfunction and multiple mood disorders, such as anxiety, depression, and apathy. Considering that balance dysfunction is a very common symptom in PD, we can presume that by its management we could positively influence patient's state of mind too. This review is an analysis of nonpharmacological methods shown to be effective and successful for improving balance in patients suffering from PD. Strategies such as general exercise, robotic assisted training, Tai Chi, Qi Gong, Yoga, dance (such as tango or ballet), box, virtual reality-based, or neurofeedback-based techniques and so forth can significantly improve the stability in these patients. Beside this physical outcome, many methods have also shown effect on quality of life, depression level, enjoyment, and motivation to continue in practicing the method independently. The purpose of this review is to provide information about practical and creative methods designed to improve balance in PD and highlight their positive impact on patient's psychology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus