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Carqueja (Baccharis trimera) Protects against Oxidative Stress and β-Amyloid-Induced Toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Paiva FA, Bonomo Lde F, Boasquivis PF, de Paula IT, Guerra JF, Leal WM, Silva ME, Pedrosa ML, Oliveira Rde P - Oxid Med Cell Longev (2015)

Bottom Line: Carqueja (Baccharis trimera) is a native plant found throughout South America.CHE treatment also increased the defenses against β-amyloid toxicity in C. elegans, in part by increasing proteasome activity and the expression of two heat shock protein genes.Our findings suggest a potential neuroprotective use for Carqueja, supporting the idea that dietary antioxidants are a promising approach to boost the defensive systems against stress and neurodegeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Núcleo de Pesquisa em Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Carqueja (Baccharis trimera) is a native plant found throughout South America. Several studies have shown that Carqueja has antioxidant activity in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, analgesic, antihepatotoxic, and antimutagenic properties. However, studies regarding its antioxidant potential in vivo are limited. In this study, we used Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to examine the antioxidant effects of a Carqueja hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) on stress resistance and lifespan and to investigate whether CHE has a protective effect in a C. elegans model for Alzheimer's disease. Here, we show for the first time, using in vivo assays, that CHE treatment improved oxidative stress resistance by increasing survival rate and by reducing ROS levels under oxidative stress conditions independently of the stress-related signaling pathways (p38, JNK, and ERK) and transcription factors (SKN-1/Nrf and DAF-16/Foxo) tested here. CHE treatment also increased the defenses against β-amyloid toxicity in C. elegans, in part by increasing proteasome activity and the expression of two heat shock protein genes. Our findings suggest a potential neuroprotective use for Carqueja, supporting the idea that dietary antioxidants are a promising approach to boost the defensive systems against stress and neurodegeneration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of Carqueja hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) on wild-type C. elegans growth, reproduction and pharyngeal pumping. (a) Body length. L1 animals were treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE for 48 h. Images were captured of L4 animals, and body length was measured along the animal axis using Axio Vision Rel. 4.8 software. There was no significant difference between groups, as determined by two-tailed Student's t-test. (b) Brood size. Progeny profiles were measured in animals treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE. Animals were transferred individually to NGM plates and moved daily until the end of the reproductive period. The results were plotted as the mean ± SEM for each day. (c) Pharyngeal pumping. Pharyngeal pumping rate was quantified using L4 wild-type animals treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE. There was no significant difference between groups, as determined by two-tailed Student's t-test.
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fig3: Effect of Carqueja hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) on wild-type C. elegans growth, reproduction and pharyngeal pumping. (a) Body length. L1 animals were treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE for 48 h. Images were captured of L4 animals, and body length was measured along the animal axis using Axio Vision Rel. 4.8 software. There was no significant difference between groups, as determined by two-tailed Student's t-test. (b) Brood size. Progeny profiles were measured in animals treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE. Animals were transferred individually to NGM plates and moved daily until the end of the reproductive period. The results were plotted as the mean ± SEM for each day. (c) Pharyngeal pumping. Pharyngeal pumping rate was quantified using L4 wild-type animals treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE. There was no significant difference between groups, as determined by two-tailed Student's t-test.

Mentions: It is known [25] that, in response to adverse environmental factors, energetic resources can be redirected to different developmental processes such as growth or reproduction. To verify whether CHE treatment would affect C. elegans growth and reproduction, we evaluated the body length and the progeny size of animals treated with 50 mg/mL CHE. The body length of treated animals was not significantly different from that of controls (P = 0.100) (Figure 3(a)). We did not observe any difference in the total progeny between controls and treated animals (P = 1.000) (data not shown). Moreover, 50 mg/mL CHE did not alter the egg-laying profile (Figure 3(b)). We also measured the pharyngeal pumping rate in L4 animals in order to verify whether CHE alters feeding behavior. The pumping frequency of 50 mg/mL CHE-treated animals was not significantly different compared to untreated animals (Figure 3(c)).


Carqueja (Baccharis trimera) Protects against Oxidative Stress and β-Amyloid-Induced Toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Paiva FA, Bonomo Lde F, Boasquivis PF, de Paula IT, Guerra JF, Leal WM, Silva ME, Pedrosa ML, Oliveira Rde P - Oxid Med Cell Longev (2015)

Effect of Carqueja hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) on wild-type C. elegans growth, reproduction and pharyngeal pumping. (a) Body length. L1 animals were treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE for 48 h. Images were captured of L4 animals, and body length was measured along the animal axis using Axio Vision Rel. 4.8 software. There was no significant difference between groups, as determined by two-tailed Student's t-test. (b) Brood size. Progeny profiles were measured in animals treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE. Animals were transferred individually to NGM plates and moved daily until the end of the reproductive period. The results were plotted as the mean ± SEM for each day. (c) Pharyngeal pumping. Pharyngeal pumping rate was quantified using L4 wild-type animals treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE. There was no significant difference between groups, as determined by two-tailed Student's t-test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508469&req=5

fig3: Effect of Carqueja hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) on wild-type C. elegans growth, reproduction and pharyngeal pumping. (a) Body length. L1 animals were treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE for 48 h. Images were captured of L4 animals, and body length was measured along the animal axis using Axio Vision Rel. 4.8 software. There was no significant difference between groups, as determined by two-tailed Student's t-test. (b) Brood size. Progeny profiles were measured in animals treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE. Animals were transferred individually to NGM plates and moved daily until the end of the reproductive period. The results were plotted as the mean ± SEM for each day. (c) Pharyngeal pumping. Pharyngeal pumping rate was quantified using L4 wild-type animals treated or not with 50 mg/mL CHE. There was no significant difference between groups, as determined by two-tailed Student's t-test.
Mentions: It is known [25] that, in response to adverse environmental factors, energetic resources can be redirected to different developmental processes such as growth or reproduction. To verify whether CHE treatment would affect C. elegans growth and reproduction, we evaluated the body length and the progeny size of animals treated with 50 mg/mL CHE. The body length of treated animals was not significantly different from that of controls (P = 0.100) (Figure 3(a)). We did not observe any difference in the total progeny between controls and treated animals (P = 1.000) (data not shown). Moreover, 50 mg/mL CHE did not alter the egg-laying profile (Figure 3(b)). We also measured the pharyngeal pumping rate in L4 animals in order to verify whether CHE alters feeding behavior. The pumping frequency of 50 mg/mL CHE-treated animals was not significantly different compared to untreated animals (Figure 3(c)).

Bottom Line: Carqueja (Baccharis trimera) is a native plant found throughout South America.CHE treatment also increased the defenses against β-amyloid toxicity in C. elegans, in part by increasing proteasome activity and the expression of two heat shock protein genes.Our findings suggest a potential neuroprotective use for Carqueja, supporting the idea that dietary antioxidants are a promising approach to boost the defensive systems against stress and neurodegeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Núcleo de Pesquisa em Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Carqueja (Baccharis trimera) is a native plant found throughout South America. Several studies have shown that Carqueja has antioxidant activity in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, analgesic, antihepatotoxic, and antimutagenic properties. However, studies regarding its antioxidant potential in vivo are limited. In this study, we used Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to examine the antioxidant effects of a Carqueja hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) on stress resistance and lifespan and to investigate whether CHE has a protective effect in a C. elegans model for Alzheimer's disease. Here, we show for the first time, using in vivo assays, that CHE treatment improved oxidative stress resistance by increasing survival rate and by reducing ROS levels under oxidative stress conditions independently of the stress-related signaling pathways (p38, JNK, and ERK) and transcription factors (SKN-1/Nrf and DAF-16/Foxo) tested here. CHE treatment also increased the defenses against β-amyloid toxicity in C. elegans, in part by increasing proteasome activity and the expression of two heat shock protein genes. Our findings suggest a potential neuroprotective use for Carqueja, supporting the idea that dietary antioxidants are a promising approach to boost the defensive systems against stress and neurodegeneration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus