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The epidemiology and aetiology of diarrhoeal disease in infancy in southern Vietnam: a birth cohort study.

Anders KL, Thompson CN, Thuy NT, Nguyet NM, Tu le TP, Dung TT, Phat VV, Van NT, Hieu NT, Tham NT, Ha PT, Lien le B, Chau NV, Baker S, Simmons CP - Int. J. Infect. Dis. (2015)

Bottom Line: Repeat infections were identified in 9% of infants infected with rotavirus, norovirus, Shigella, or Campylobacter, and 13% of those with Salmonella infections.A large proportion of laboratory-diagnosed disease was caused by rotavirus and norovirus.These data highlight the unmet need for a rotavirus vaccine in Vietnam and provide evidence of the previously unrecognized burden of norovirus in infants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Hospital for Tropical Diseases, 764 Vo Van Kiet, District 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; Centre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Oxford University, Oxford, UK; Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: katieanders99@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Aetiology of diarrhoeal disease. The proportion of diarrhoeal episodes (among those with a positive stool sample) that were positive for each single pathogen or combination of pathogens, (A) by study site, and (B) by hospitalization status.
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fig0005: Aetiology of diarrhoeal disease. The proportion of diarrhoeal episodes (among those with a positive stool sample) that were positive for each single pathogen or combination of pathogens, (A) by study site, and (B) by hospitalization status.

Mentions: Stool samples were collected from a far greater proportion of diarrhoeal episodes in the Dong Thap cohort compared to the HCMC cohort (86% vs. 47%). For inpatient diarrhoeal episodes in particular, the completeness of stool sample collection was far higher in Dong Thap (103/126; 82%) than in HCMC (5/18; 28%). This was due to difficulties in identifying hospital admissions of cohort members in real time in HCMC. The proportion of samples positive for at least one pathogen did not differ between sites, but was collectively higher among inpatient samples than outpatient samples (69% vs. 56%). The distribution of aetiologies differed significantly between HCMC and Dong Thap (Chi-square p < 0.001), with viral infections more common in HCMC and bacterial and mixed viral/bacterial infections more common in Dong Thap (Figure 1A). Mixed viral/bacterial infections were more common among hospitalized diarrhoeal cases than outpatients, however the overall distribution of aetiologies was not significantly different between outpatients and inpatients (Chi-square p = 0.09; Figure 1B). Among all detected diarrhoeal episodes, infections with a mixed viral/bacterial aetiology were most likely to be admitted to hospital (26%, 35/133), followed by viral infections (17%, 67/391).


The epidemiology and aetiology of diarrhoeal disease in infancy in southern Vietnam: a birth cohort study.

Anders KL, Thompson CN, Thuy NT, Nguyet NM, Tu le TP, Dung TT, Phat VV, Van NT, Hieu NT, Tham NT, Ha PT, Lien le B, Chau NV, Baker S, Simmons CP - Int. J. Infect. Dis. (2015)

Aetiology of diarrhoeal disease. The proportion of diarrhoeal episodes (among those with a positive stool sample) that were positive for each single pathogen or combination of pathogens, (A) by study site, and (B) by hospitalization status.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508461&req=5

fig0005: Aetiology of diarrhoeal disease. The proportion of diarrhoeal episodes (among those with a positive stool sample) that were positive for each single pathogen or combination of pathogens, (A) by study site, and (B) by hospitalization status.
Mentions: Stool samples were collected from a far greater proportion of diarrhoeal episodes in the Dong Thap cohort compared to the HCMC cohort (86% vs. 47%). For inpatient diarrhoeal episodes in particular, the completeness of stool sample collection was far higher in Dong Thap (103/126; 82%) than in HCMC (5/18; 28%). This was due to difficulties in identifying hospital admissions of cohort members in real time in HCMC. The proportion of samples positive for at least one pathogen did not differ between sites, but was collectively higher among inpatient samples than outpatient samples (69% vs. 56%). The distribution of aetiologies differed significantly between HCMC and Dong Thap (Chi-square p < 0.001), with viral infections more common in HCMC and bacterial and mixed viral/bacterial infections more common in Dong Thap (Figure 1A). Mixed viral/bacterial infections were more common among hospitalized diarrhoeal cases than outpatients, however the overall distribution of aetiologies was not significantly different between outpatients and inpatients (Chi-square p = 0.09; Figure 1B). Among all detected diarrhoeal episodes, infections with a mixed viral/bacterial aetiology were most likely to be admitted to hospital (26%, 35/133), followed by viral infections (17%, 67/391).

Bottom Line: Repeat infections were identified in 9% of infants infected with rotavirus, norovirus, Shigella, or Campylobacter, and 13% of those with Salmonella infections.A large proportion of laboratory-diagnosed disease was caused by rotavirus and norovirus.These data highlight the unmet need for a rotavirus vaccine in Vietnam and provide evidence of the previously unrecognized burden of norovirus in infants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Hospital for Tropical Diseases, 764 Vo Van Kiet, District 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; Centre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Oxford University, Oxford, UK; Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: katieanders99@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus