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Contribution of Major Lifestyle Risk Factors for Incident Heart Failure in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study.

Del Gobbo LC, Kalantarian S, Imamura F, Lemaitre R, Siscovick DS, Psaty BM, Mozaffarian D - JACC Heart Fail (2015)

Bottom Line: No dietary pattern was associated with developing HF (p > 0.05).Modest alcohol intake, maintaining a body mass index <30 kg/m(2), and not smoking were also independently associated with a lower risk of HF.Among older U.S. adults, physical activity, modest alcohol intake, avoiding obesity, and not smoking, but not dietary patterns, were associated with a lower risk of HF.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: Liana.Del_Gobbo@tufts.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Risk of Incident HF for Low-Risk Lifestyle Factors in Major Subgroups of Older Adults (n = 4,490)Low-risk lifestyle factors included healthy diet pattern (upper 3 quintiles), walking pace ≥2 mph, leisure activity ≥850 kcal/week, no current smoking, ≥1 drink/week of alcohol intake, and a body mass index <30 kg/m2. Multivariate models for each lifestyle factor were adjusted for age (years), sex (male vs. female), race (Caucasian vs. non-Caucasian), enrollment site (4 clinics), education (less than high school, high school, more than high school), annual income (<$25,000, $25,000 to $49,999, >$50,000) and mutually adjusted for other lifestyle factors in the figure. None of the differences were significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. CHD = coronary heart disease; other abbreviations as in Figure 1.
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fig2: Risk of Incident HF for Low-Risk Lifestyle Factors in Major Subgroups of Older Adults (n = 4,490)Low-risk lifestyle factors included healthy diet pattern (upper 3 quintiles), walking pace ≥2 mph, leisure activity ≥850 kcal/week, no current smoking, ≥1 drink/week of alcohol intake, and a body mass index <30 kg/m2. Multivariate models for each lifestyle factor were adjusted for age (years), sex (male vs. female), race (Caucasian vs. non-Caucasian), enrollment site (4 clinics), education (less than high school, high school, more than high school), annual income (<$25,000, $25,000 to $49,999, >$50,000) and mutually adjusted for other lifestyle factors in the figure. None of the differences were significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. CHD = coronary heart disease; other abbreviations as in Figure 1.

Mentions: Heterogeneity in the association between diet and HF was not observed by any of the potential effect modifiers (pinteraction >0.05) (Online Table 4), although the AHA 2020 diet pattern was associated with a trend toward lower HF risk in African Americans (pinteraction = 0.07) and those without baseline CHD (pinteraction = 0.06; HR: 0.86; 95% CI 0.70 to 1.06). After Bonferroni correction, there was also little evidence for heterogeneity by age, sex, baseline CHD, treated hypertension, and diabetes for the association of nondietary lifestyle factors with HF (Figure 2).


Contribution of Major Lifestyle Risk Factors for Incident Heart Failure in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study.

Del Gobbo LC, Kalantarian S, Imamura F, Lemaitre R, Siscovick DS, Psaty BM, Mozaffarian D - JACC Heart Fail (2015)

Risk of Incident HF for Low-Risk Lifestyle Factors in Major Subgroups of Older Adults (n = 4,490)Low-risk lifestyle factors included healthy diet pattern (upper 3 quintiles), walking pace ≥2 mph, leisure activity ≥850 kcal/week, no current smoking, ≥1 drink/week of alcohol intake, and a body mass index <30 kg/m2. Multivariate models for each lifestyle factor were adjusted for age (years), sex (male vs. female), race (Caucasian vs. non-Caucasian), enrollment site (4 clinics), education (less than high school, high school, more than high school), annual income (<$25,000, $25,000 to $49,999, >$50,000) and mutually adjusted for other lifestyle factors in the figure. None of the differences were significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. CHD = coronary heart disease; other abbreviations as in Figure 1.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig2: Risk of Incident HF for Low-Risk Lifestyle Factors in Major Subgroups of Older Adults (n = 4,490)Low-risk lifestyle factors included healthy diet pattern (upper 3 quintiles), walking pace ≥2 mph, leisure activity ≥850 kcal/week, no current smoking, ≥1 drink/week of alcohol intake, and a body mass index <30 kg/m2. Multivariate models for each lifestyle factor were adjusted for age (years), sex (male vs. female), race (Caucasian vs. non-Caucasian), enrollment site (4 clinics), education (less than high school, high school, more than high school), annual income (<$25,000, $25,000 to $49,999, >$50,000) and mutually adjusted for other lifestyle factors in the figure. None of the differences were significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. CHD = coronary heart disease; other abbreviations as in Figure 1.
Mentions: Heterogeneity in the association between diet and HF was not observed by any of the potential effect modifiers (pinteraction >0.05) (Online Table 4), although the AHA 2020 diet pattern was associated with a trend toward lower HF risk in African Americans (pinteraction = 0.07) and those without baseline CHD (pinteraction = 0.06; HR: 0.86; 95% CI 0.70 to 1.06). After Bonferroni correction, there was also little evidence for heterogeneity by age, sex, baseline CHD, treated hypertension, and diabetes for the association of nondietary lifestyle factors with HF (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: No dietary pattern was associated with developing HF (p > 0.05).Modest alcohol intake, maintaining a body mass index <30 kg/m(2), and not smoking were also independently associated with a lower risk of HF.Among older U.S. adults, physical activity, modest alcohol intake, avoiding obesity, and not smoking, but not dietary patterns, were associated with a lower risk of HF.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: Liana.Del_Gobbo@tufts.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus