Limits...
Oxidatively damaged guanosine in white blood cells and in urine of welders: associations with exposure to welding fumes and body iron stores.

Pesch B, Lotz A, Koch HM, Marczynski B, Casjens S, Käfferlein HU, Welge P, Lehnert M, Heinze E, Van Gelder R, Hahn JU, Behrens T, Raulf M, Hartwig A, Weiss T, Brüning T - Arch. Toxicol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive.We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ≤57 µg/m(3).Similar effects were found for manganese.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Institute of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (IPA), Bürkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789, Bochum, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers the carcinogenicity of welding fume of priority for re-evaluation. Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive. Here, we investigated the association of personal exposure to metals in respirable welding fumes during a working shift with oxidatively damaged guanosine in DNA of white blood cells (WBC) and in postshift urine samples from 238 welders. Medians of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were 2.35/10(6) dGuo in DNA of WBC and 4.33 µg/g creatinine in urine. The median of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) was 7.03 µg/g creatinine in urine. The extent of both urinary parameters was higher in welders applying techniques with high particle emission rates to stainless steel than in tungsten inert gas welders (8-oxodGuo: 9.96 vs. 4.49 µg/L, 8-oxoGuo: 15.7 vs. 7.7 µg/L), but this apparent difference diminished after creatinine adjustment. We applied random intercept models to estimate the influence of airborne and systemic exposure to metals on oxidatively damaged guanosine in WBC and urine together with covariates. We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ≤57 µg/m(3). Similar effects were found for manganese. Airborne chromium but not nickel was associated with all oxidatively modified guanosine measures, whereas urinary chromium as well as nickel showed associations with urinary modified guanosines. In summary, oxidatively damaged urinary guanosine was associated with airborne and systemic exposure to metals in welders and showed a strong relation to body iron stores.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Association between age and urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-oxyguanosine in 238 welders
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508371&req=5

Fig1: Association between age and urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-oxyguanosine in 238 welders

Mentions: The median age of 238 welders was 42 years (range 19–61 years). More than 50 % of the welders reported active smoking. The univariate analysis of unadjusted data showed no clear association between oxidatively damaged guanosines and smoking status (Supplementary Table 1). Age and years of working as welder were tightly linked (τb = 0.68, P < 0.0001). Whereas we could not observe an accumulation of 8-oxodGuo by age, there was a trend of increasing excretion of 8-oxoGuo in urine by age as shown in Fig. 1. Figure 2 depicts the correlation of urinary 8-oxoGuo with body iron stores assessed as SF. Cr could be detected in erythrocytes of 15 (6.3 %) welders, who showed no obvious difference in the creatinine-adjusted concentrations of oxidatively modified guanosines compared to the other welders (e.g., 8-oxoGuo: 6.86 µg/g creatinine vs. 7.05 µg/g creatinine), although the unadjusted concentrations were higher (e.g., 8-oxoGuo: 16.44 vs. 10.99 µg/L). Few welders exhibited elevated C-reactive protein (N = 9) or reported an intake of acetylsalicylic acid medication (N = 10). We observed a minor increase in adduct levels in both subgroups of welders. Furthermore, we found lower DNA adduct rates in WBC in samples collected during winter.Fig. 1


Oxidatively damaged guanosine in white blood cells and in urine of welders: associations with exposure to welding fumes and body iron stores.

Pesch B, Lotz A, Koch HM, Marczynski B, Casjens S, Käfferlein HU, Welge P, Lehnert M, Heinze E, Van Gelder R, Hahn JU, Behrens T, Raulf M, Hartwig A, Weiss T, Brüning T - Arch. Toxicol. (2014)

Association between age and urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-oxyguanosine in 238 welders
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4508371&req=5

Fig1: Association between age and urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-oxyguanosine in 238 welders
Mentions: The median age of 238 welders was 42 years (range 19–61 years). More than 50 % of the welders reported active smoking. The univariate analysis of unadjusted data showed no clear association between oxidatively damaged guanosines and smoking status (Supplementary Table 1). Age and years of working as welder were tightly linked (τb = 0.68, P < 0.0001). Whereas we could not observe an accumulation of 8-oxodGuo by age, there was a trend of increasing excretion of 8-oxoGuo in urine by age as shown in Fig. 1. Figure 2 depicts the correlation of urinary 8-oxoGuo with body iron stores assessed as SF. Cr could be detected in erythrocytes of 15 (6.3 %) welders, who showed no obvious difference in the creatinine-adjusted concentrations of oxidatively modified guanosines compared to the other welders (e.g., 8-oxoGuo: 6.86 µg/g creatinine vs. 7.05 µg/g creatinine), although the unadjusted concentrations were higher (e.g., 8-oxoGuo: 16.44 vs. 10.99 µg/L). Few welders exhibited elevated C-reactive protein (N = 9) or reported an intake of acetylsalicylic acid medication (N = 10). We observed a minor increase in adduct levels in both subgroups of welders. Furthermore, we found lower DNA adduct rates in WBC in samples collected during winter.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive.We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ≤57 µg/m(3).Similar effects were found for manganese.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Institute of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (IPA), Bürkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789, Bochum, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers the carcinogenicity of welding fume of priority for re-evaluation. Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive. Here, we investigated the association of personal exposure to metals in respirable welding fumes during a working shift with oxidatively damaged guanosine in DNA of white blood cells (WBC) and in postshift urine samples from 238 welders. Medians of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were 2.35/10(6) dGuo in DNA of WBC and 4.33 µg/g creatinine in urine. The median of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) was 7.03 µg/g creatinine in urine. The extent of both urinary parameters was higher in welders applying techniques with high particle emission rates to stainless steel than in tungsten inert gas welders (8-oxodGuo: 9.96 vs. 4.49 µg/L, 8-oxoGuo: 15.7 vs. 7.7 µg/L), but this apparent difference diminished after creatinine adjustment. We applied random intercept models to estimate the influence of airborne and systemic exposure to metals on oxidatively damaged guanosine in WBC and urine together with covariates. We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ≤57 µg/m(3). Similar effects were found for manganese. Airborne chromium but not nickel was associated with all oxidatively modified guanosine measures, whereas urinary chromium as well as nickel showed associations with urinary modified guanosines. In summary, oxidatively damaged urinary guanosine was associated with airborne and systemic exposure to metals in welders and showed a strong relation to body iron stores.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus